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The Grind! How to Rank Higher on Amazon

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Oh, what a grind it can be to filter through reports to identify the winning and losing keywords, then update campaign settings, create targeted manual ads, include negative keywords and even update product listings sometimes. But hey, it works!

This is one of the most common optimization strategies on Amazon today and it is also one of the most efficient ones. It involves a number of different mechanisms which work together closely. On Amazon, there isn’t a big distance between SEO, CRO and PPC as you often find in relation with search marketing for Google.

We can organize the work on optimizing for Amazon into five key areas that will all help you rank higher on Amazon:

  • Organic
  • PPC
  • CRO
  • Outside referrals
  • Sales

In terms of organic ranks, content is a very important ranking factor and what you really need to focus on is your product. This is about making your product listings and your brand store look the best.

How to structure your title

Just like it is one of the key elements for good old SEO, the title for your product listing is an important part of your organic optimization.

  • Use your keywords in order of importance even if that means putting your brand 2nd.
  • Optimise your title readability for mobile, desktops and your ads.

Title Text Lengths

  • For desktop organic results use around 115-144 characters.
  • PPC will pull 30-33 characters of your product title.
  • Organic mobile titles will pull about 55-63 characters.

Back end search terms are by far the most important tool for organic ranking on Amazon. Enter all your keywords that you can’t fit into your product listings and descriptions. It’s not visible to customers but is indexed by Amazon. There are only however, an extra 250 characters available to be indexed. This is where you should include common misspellings however, you don’t need to worry about punctuation, singular or plural words as Amazon will take this into account.

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Amazon Keyword Research

For keyword research there are many tools you can use. Ahrefs, Helium 10, JungleScout and Factor A are some of them. You can even use Google Ads!

Amazon PPC

Amazon offers 2 advertising solutions. The Amazon DSP is a programmatic advertising based on CPM (cost per mille) and the Amazon Sponsored Ads solution is based on CPC (cost per click). That’s the one we are interested in!

This is where we can bid you welcome to Amazon Adwords. The Sponsored products solution is primarily based on keyword targeting very similar to Google Ads.

This is the easiest way to drive your sales up on Amazon.  Start by running automatic campaign suggested to you by Amazon then transfer the successful keywords to manual PPC campaigns to target your keywords, then pump up the bids to drive exposure. Running your paid activity for a short period at cost or even at a loss will be worthwhile to increase your organic ranking.

  • You type in the campaign name, so you can monitor the results.
  • Add in how much your daily budget is
  • Pick the dates you want your campaign to run.

Now it’s time to set the key words you want to target – again, you have the choice to do this manually or automatically through Amazon. Like on AdWords, you can decide if you want the keywords to match exactly, broadly or as a phrase. A mixture of all three is the best way forward.

PPC boosts your organic, so it’s worth running at an initial loss or, better yet, break even for the initial gains. Plus, you get the added benefit of having an initial surge of data that you can use to refine your own process and learn more about your customers.

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It all really depends what your acos (Advertising Cost of Sales – the percent of ad spend divided by the attributed sale). You can see this number in the Keyword section of your advertising tab.

Attributed Sales (how many sales you made that week that are directly linked to your ad) are important. If by the 2nd or 3rd campaign you’re not showing a weekly ROI, there’s a good chance you’ve not targeted the right keywords.

Not only will this cost you money, but it’ll be ruining your CRO on your Amazon account, which is an Amazon Ranking factor. Impressions (the number of times your ads were displayed) are important, but not at the cost of lowering your rankings

CRO

The best tool I can recommend is Sellerly by SEMrush. It offers you the ability to AB test your products and your ads

  • Customer reviews: The higher your reviews, the higher Amazon is going to rank you. Like Google, you need to get a few reviews before Amazon starts to rank you against the bigger competitors.
  • Image size and quality: Use all the photo spaces you’re slowed and they all must be 1000 x1000 pixels so your buyer can zoom in from all angles.
  • Price: Amazon will always values its buyers over its sellers, it will always push the best seller, which is most likely the lowest price to the top, so you need to audit your competitors regularly to see what they are charging.
  • Exit rates: If someone looks at your product then immediately exits the Amazon site, Amazon will lower your ranking. If you are in no way misleading, this won’t be a problem.
  • Bounce rate: Same as the above, if someone lands on your product then leaves quickly to look at someone else’s, Amazon will penalise you.
  • What’s the best way to get conversion? Offer a deal.
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The biggest ranking factor of all is Sales and driving traffic from outside of Amazon. These are Amazon’s equivalent to links for Google SEO. The more sales you have, the higher you’ll rank. If you start to outsell your competitors who outrank you for your keywords, Amazon will reward you with a higher ranking. Using Facebook, Twitter and even Google to drive traffic to your product will also help you rank faster and higher on Amazon.

Source : « Marketing on Amazon in 2020 », Innovell February 2020, https://www.innovell.com/amazon-marketing-report/

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AMAZON

Amazon’s AWS logs third outage this month, affecting Slack, Epic Games Store, Asana and more

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Amazon’s crucial web services business AWS is experiencing problems today, with issues affecting services like Slack, Imgur, and the Epic Games store for some users. It’s not looking good if you’re working from home, with some Slack users unable to view or upload images, and work management tool Asana also hit by the outages. As of 6:13 AM PST, Amazon said it had restored power to affected servers, but users may still experience issues going forward.

In an incident update, Slack said its services were “experiencing issues with file uploads, message editing, and other services.” Asana said the problems constituted a “major outage,” with “many of our users unable to access Asana.” Epic Games Store said “Internet services outages” were “affecting logins, library, purchases, etc.”

It’s the third time in as many weeks that problems with AWS have had a significant effect on online services. Two incidents earlier this month involving AWS ended up knocking out a huge array of platforms and products, taking out streaming sites like Netflix and Disney Plus as well as smart home devices like security cameras from Ring and Wyze.

Today’s outages seem less widespread but still notable, with some users unable to access services entirely and others merely experiencing intermittent faults. DownDetector.com shows reports of issues with the platforms mentioned above, as well as news aggregator Flipboard, online learning site Udemy, dating app Grindr, streaming service Hulu, and IoT services from Honeywell, Life360, and Samsung’s SmartThings.

The official AWS service health dashboard blamed the issues on power outages in a single data center, affecting one Availability Zone (USE1-AZ4) within the US-EAST-1 Region. At 6:13 AM PST, the company said it had restored power to the data center and was making progress recovering the affected instances. However, users will likely continue to notice the effects of these outages for a while longer while systems are updated and restored.

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Update Wednesday, December 22nd, 8:36AM ET: Updated story to add responses from affected services.

Update Wednesday, December 22nd, 9: 34AM ET: Updated story to note that AWS has restored to power to the affected data center.

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AMAZON

The NLRB decision against Amazon was correct and shows the need for stronger labor laws

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The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB ruled last month that Amazon had cheated to defeat a high profile union organizing campaign.

It found that Amazon violated federal labor laws during its anti-union campaign at a Bessemer warehouse, Ala. earlier this year. This will result in a do-over election.

The NLRB criticized Amazon’s “flagrant disregard” for federal union election rules and stated that the management had “essentially highjacked” the process and given the impression that it was in control of the outcome.

Last week, Kirsten Swingingen, the head of the virulently antiunion Coalition for a Democratic Workplace, published a misleading op ed in The Hill about the NLRB ruling.

Let’s first be clear about the reasons why Amazon was ordered to rerun its election by the NLRB.
According to the op-ed, Amazon installed a mailbox in order to make voting easier. However, the NLRB repeatedly told Amazon that it couldn’t have onsite voting. After the company pushed for it, and then unsuccessfully appealed against the NLRB decision. In a stunning act of arrogance, Amazon’s top managers ignored these clear instructions and forced the United States Postal Service to install an onsite mailbox just before the election period. A senior USPS manager stated that this was the first instance in his many decades of service when it had set up a “cluster mailbox” for a single customer due to the upcoming NLRB elections.

After being told by the USPS to not place stickers on the mailbox, Amazon covered the mailbox with a marquee with large slogans. The USPS replied, ” Surprise” when asked how he felt about Amazon’s disregard for clear instructions. Moreover, the NLRB discovered that Amazon’s management engaged in illegal monitoring of workers’ voting intentions.

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These charges are serious, considering the overwhelming evidence of illegal activity. It would be surprising if NLRB did not reverse the tainted election. This would be a message to employees that the law doesn’t apply to them if they have the wealth, resources and ability to bully them if it was in the way of Amazon’s illegal conduct.

The NLRB Hearing officer and its Atlanta-based Regional director made the decision to reverse the tainted vote. Neither of these people are political appointees – instead, they are career lawyers or “former employees” as the op ed misleads. Swearingen instead resorts to misleading tropes regarding “Big Labor” in order to describe a small, but determined union, the Retail Wholesale & Department Store Union. This union is up against Amazon, one of the most powerful and wealthy corporations on the planet. Bessemer was not the first to find Amazon guilty of illegal anti-union behavior. The NLRB found Amazon in violation of its laws.

It is important to correct a blatant lie about the Protecting the Right to Organize legislation (PRO Act), currently pending before the U.S. Senate. Incorrectly, the op-ed states that the PRO Act “potentially eradicates secret ballot elections” but allows for “card certification” of unions. This is essentially recognizing unions only after authorization cards are signed by the majority of workers, as practiced in many rich democracies.

To be clear, the Pro Act does not mention card check certification. The author created this provision to support her extreme anti-union views. The PRO Act would ban mandatory anti-union “captive audience” meetings- forcible listening sessions. According to Amazon’s own testimony, these were conducted thousands of times at Bessemer. It also imposes harsher penalties on corporations like Amazon who violate workers’ right to choose a union.

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The op-ed also states that “Big Labor… succeeded in pushing Democrats to include PRO Act policies into the budget reconciliation bill.” However, the bill only contains the PRO Act provision. This includes the much-needed financial sanctions for corporations such as Amazon that repeatedly violate workers rights.

The NLRB was right to reverse the Bessemer election that was fundamentally tainted due to Amazon’s conduct. The Bessemer campaign demonstrates that the NLRB needs to have more options. As it stands, the law is too toothless for a massively powerful, incredibly wealthy, and frequently illegal corporate bully. The Senate should immediately pass the PRO Act.

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AMAZON

Amazon Alexa SEO Tools Is Closing

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Alexa.com announced that it will be retiring its marketing services after 25 years. Founded in 1996, Alexa was subsequently acquired by Amazon in 1999. It was initially known for providing rankings based on traffic measured through a toolbar but Alexa eventually expanded to provide a full suite of marketing products including site auditing and backlink checking.

Screenshot From Alexa Content Marketing

Alexa Rank

Alexa.com provides a full suite of search marketing tools. However what it’s mainly known for is their Alexa Rank.

Alexa Rank is a metric that offers a measurement of site popularity.

In the early 2000s the data was collected via an Alexa toolbar that users downloaded and surfed with. The toolbars collected web traffic information from the users which fed into the Alexa Rank site popularity metric.

Web publishers could also install a script on their site that reported traffic which could then be used to raise their Alexa Rank scores.

The Alexa Rank scores were generally viewed with suspicion because some people claimed that installing the toolbar and visiting ones own sites could result in dramatically raising the Alexa Rank score.

Another criticism of Alexa Rank was that the data was more relevant for Asian countries than in English speaking countries. This was based on the rumor that the Alexa toolbar use base was heavily weighted towards users in Korea and not users in English speaking countries like the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the UK.

The negative reputation of Alexa Rank and anything offered by Alexa was sealed by 2005.

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One search marketer in a 2005 forum discussion remarked:

“Isn’t it time for Amazon to throw in the towel on Alexa? For a company that does so many things well, Alexa is really a blight on their reputation. Why would they want to be associated with such garbage.”

Nevertheless, use of the Alexa Rank metric continued to be used by a dwindling amount of search marketers.

For example, to this day there are some companies that offer affiliate programs and use Alexa Rank to determine the popularity of potential affiliate partners and will not accept affiliates whose websites do not reach a minimum Alexa Rank popularity threshold.

Alexa Was More Than A Site Popularity Ranking Metric

It might come as a surprise to many that Alexa offered a complete suite of search marketing and analytics programs.

For some reason the Alexa suite of online marketing tools, which included a backlink checker, was almost kept as a secret, with apparently no outreach to the search marketing community or seemingly no promotional activity to speak of.

Alexa crawled the entire Internet and for many years provided snapshots of the Internet to Archive.org. It’s backlink information was extensive.

Because of that it was able to offer services like showing which backlinks competitors have in common, including as many as ten competitors at a time.

Screenshot Of An Alexa Backlink Information Page

The Alexa $149/month plan offered:

  • Content Exploration
  • Competitive Content Analysis
  • Topic Research
  • Top Publishers by Topic
  • Competitive Analysis
  • Competitor Keyword Matrix
  • Keyword Difficulty Tool
  • Keyword Share of Voice
  • Organic Keywords
  • Paid Keywords
  • Site Audits
  • On-Page SEO Checker
  • Competitor Backlink Checker
  • Backlink Checks
  • Audience Analysis
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Alexa.com Retired

Alexa announced that it will all be going away on May 1, 2022.

The announcement was short and with no explanation as to what led to the decision.

“Twenty-five years ago, we founded Alexa Internet. After two decades of helping you find, reach, and convert your digital audience, we’ve made the difficult decision to retire Alexa.com on May 1, 2022.

Thank you for making us your go-to resource for content research, competitive analysis, keyword research, and so much more.”

Alexa offered a powerful suite of SEO and marketing tools and it’s sad to see them go away.

Many people didn’t know about the tools and perhaps it might still be around if it had been promoted better.

Citations

Official Alexa.com Announcement

We will be retiring Alexa.com on May 1, 2022

Archive.org Snapshot of Alexa.com Search Marketing Offerings

Archive.org Snapshot of Alexa Backlink Checker Tool

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