Connect with us

NEWS

R.I.P. to the Top 10 Failed Social Media Sites

Published

on

There’s no doubt social media has changed so many lives – not just in America, but throughout the entire world.

Communication, no matter how far away someone else may be (as long as they have a decent internet connection 😊), has become easier than ever.

Marketing has evolved in ways few people expected it to, too.

And yet, social media platforms continue to come and go.

Here is a list of the 10 most legendary social media sites to go by the wayside since the web began.

10. DailyBooth

DailyBooth was a photoblogging site that encouraged users to take a daily picture with a caption.

Similar to modern-day Instagram, the now-defunct photo-oriented social platform launched about a year and half prior to Instagram’s launch, then officially shut down at the end of 2012.

Following its launch in February of 2009, DailyBooth gained popularity when celebrities and influencers began joining the social network, which hit its 1 millionth photo in September 2009.

Advertisement

Less than six months later, it reached 3 million photos uploads and 10 million comments.

In April 2012, Airbnb took over the DailyBooth team to aid in the travel website’s overall mission and at the end of that year, DailyBooth was nothing more than a memory.

9. FriendFeed

FriendFeed

FriendFeed was a social-aggregating website that launched in 2007.

Founded by a group of former Google employees, FriendFeed essentially used other social networks to build its own network, focusing on relevancy and usefulness on those sites then consolidating updates on its platform.

Facebook bought FriendFeed in 2009 for $15 million cash and $32.5 million in stock. The social networking giant closed FriendFeed down for good in April 2015.

8. iTunes Ping

This Apple-owned social networking site had an obvious emphasis on music and was lucky enough to launch with more than 1 million users in 2010.

But even that couldn’t save it.

Launched as a built-in component to iTunes in its 10th edition, the service allowed users to follow artists and get updates from friends and artists about music.

Advertisement

Ping was eventually closed down in 2012 and replaced with social media integration for Facebook and Twitter.

7. Google Wave & Google Buzz

Google Buzz icon

Google Buzz launched in 2010, replacing Google Wave, which launched one year prior in 2009. Each was an attempt by Google to develop a global social media site that could rival Facebook.

Both platforms were designed to allow users to share posts with friends privately or publicly with an extensive list of integration partners that included Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, Blogger, the aforementioned FriendFeed, and more.

Ultimately, Buzz was a giant privacy nightmare and Wave was a complicated mess, so both platforms were doomed to be added to Google’s project graveyard.

6. Meerkat

An innovative video platform that eventually helped propel livestreaming to the top of all of our social feeds, Meerkat ended up being doomed by the big-name social media giants (Facebook and Twitter, namely) after they recreated the idea on their already-established – and multi-faceted – social media channels.

It was only a few weeks after Meerkat’s release that Twitter halted its access to Twitter’s social graph, then acquired rivaling live-video app Periscope and launched it in late March 2015.

Both Facebook and Instagram offer similar features in their apps, with Facebook launching Facebook Live in April 2016

5. Friendster

Friendster

One of the original social networks to make noise before Facebook, Friendster dominated the Asian market since it launched (in 2002).

Advertisement

It was available and used globally, but 90% of its traffic came from Asia. The platform had more unique visitors than any other social network in Asia in 2008.

Friendster ended up evolving into a social gaming site in 2011, touting more than 115 million users mostly from the Philippines, Malaysia, and Singapore.

It officially closed down in 2018 after a three-year hiatus.

4. Yik Yak

Yik Yak

At its peak, Yik Yak was valued at $400 million.

After launching in 2014, the anonymous messaging mobile app gained momentum quickly among young adults, raising more than $70 million in venture capital funding but also a hefty load of problems. Its biggest, one of its main features: its anonymity.

Users – typically high school and college students – could publicly post anything they wanted for other anonymous users in their geographic vicinity to see and interact with. This caused problems for obvious reasons, including bomb threats and hate-fueled acts of violence.

The world of social media was/is already littered with internet bullies and is what oftentimes seems like a cesspool of human interaction – and Yik Yak was only contributing to the strife.

It didn’t take long for the tables to turn. By the end of 2014, Yik Yak was already declining in popularity and usage.

Advertisement

It eventually closed down for good in early 2017.

3. Vine

Vine

A social media legend (and my personal favorite) that helped propel video into the limelight, Vine was another ahead-of-its-time mobile app that helped set the bar for how social media and video could use one another to thrive.

The short-form video app was acquired by Twitter prior to its official launch and ended up becoming the most downloaded free app in the U.S. iOS App Store at its peak in 2013. Up to that point, it was the most popular video app ever to come out.

But it didn’t last long.

Vine was unable to adapt as other rivals (e.g., Snapchat) emerged and adapted. Plus, Twitter’s own business fluttered, which forced Twitter to close Vine in late 2016.

2. Google Plus

The Real History of Google Plus

Another “test” of Google’s, the fate of Google Plus turned out just like so many of Google’s other attempts at building a social network – failure.

A revolutionary platform in the way it helped evolve search while further educating the world of web marketing about authority and entities across the globe, Google Plus turned out to be another failed attempt at dethroning Facebook by a rival social network.

But it wasn’t even a social network at all.

Advertisement

And maybe that’s where a lot of its problems arose.

Google was actually focused on its “identity network” because of plans to be identity service providers for a program run by the federal government.

It offered nothing worthy to its users, and, for that, it is now where it belongs: extinct.

1. MySpace

MySpace

Yes, MySpace still exists.

It has a working URL, an office with employees, and, most importantly, you can sign up for a new account right now.

But this isn’t the same pioneering MySpace that helped spawn social media from what seemed like a few dark basements (it wasn’t) to what ended up being billions of households (and smartphones) across the world.

This is the MySpace that helped shape the digital marketing age of today, catalyzing the success of Facebook even more when it relinquished its title as the most popular social media network to it.

MySpace went from the most visited website in the world in 2006 to losing 10 million unique users in just one month in 2011.

Advertisement

It pivoted itself as the leading social network before reinventing itself as a music-focused network for new artists and less “personal business.”

It hasn’t seemed to work since then.

What’s worse? MySpace keeps shooting itself in the foot. And the latest blunder isn’t one to scoff at. Especially since it tells the same story I tell here: MySpace is dead.

NEWS

Google December Product Reviews Update Affects More Than English Language Sites? via @sejournal, @martinibuster

Published

on

Google’s Product Reviews update was announced to be rolling out to the English language. No mention was made as to if or when it would roll out to other languages. Mueller answered a question as to whether it is rolling out to other languages.

Google December 2021 Product Reviews Update

On December 1, 2021, Google announced on Twitter that a Product Review update would be rolling out that would focus on English language web pages.

The focus of the update was for improving the quality of reviews shown in Google search, specifically targeting review sites.

A Googler tweeted a description of the kinds of sites that would be targeted for demotion in the search rankings:

“Mainly relevant to sites that post articles reviewing products.

Think of sites like “best TVs under $200″.com.

Goal is to improve the quality and usefulness of reviews we show users.”

Advertisement

Advertisement

Continue Reading Below

Google also published a blog post with more guidance on the product review update that introduced two new best practices that Google’s algorithm would be looking for.

The first best practice was a requirement of evidence that a product was actually handled and reviewed.

The second best practice was to provide links to more than one place that a user could purchase the product.

The Twitter announcement stated that it was rolling out to English language websites. The blog post did not mention what languages it was rolling out to nor did the blog post specify that the product review update was limited to the English language.

Google’s Mueller Thinking About Product Reviews Update

Screenshot of Google's John Mueller trying to recall if December Product Review Update affects more than the English language

Screenshot of Google's John Mueller trying to recall if December Product Review Update affects more than the English language

Product Review Update Targets More Languages?

The person asking the question was rightly under the impression that the product review update only affected English language search results.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Continue Reading Below

But he asserted that he was seeing search volatility in the German language that appears to be related to Google’s December 2021 Product Review Update.

This is his question:

“I was seeing some movements in German search as well.

So I was wondering if there could also be an effect on websites in other languages by this product reviews update… because we had lots of movement and volatility in the last weeks.

…My question is, is it possible that the product reviews update affects other sites as well?”

John Mueller answered:

“I don’t know… like other languages?

My assumption was this was global and and across all languages.

But I don’t know what we announced in the blog post specifically.

Advertisement

But usually we try to push the engineering team to make a decision on that so that we can document it properly in the blog post.

I don’t know if that happened with the product reviews update. I don’t recall the complete blog post.

But it’s… from my point of view it seems like something that we could be doing in multiple languages and wouldn’t be tied to English.

And even if it were English initially, it feels like something that is relevant across the board, and we should try to find ways to roll that out to other languages over time as well.

So I’m not particularly surprised that you see changes in Germany.

But I also don’t know what we actually announced with regards to the locations and languages that are involved.”

Does Product Reviews Update Affect More Languages?

While the tweeted announcement specified that the product reviews update was limited to the English language the official blog post did not mention any such limitations.

Google’s John Mueller offered his opinion that the product reviews update is something that Google could do in multiple languages.

Advertisement

One must wonder if the tweet was meant to communicate that the update was rolling out first in English and subsequently to other languages.

It’s unclear if the product reviews update was rolled out globally to more languages. Hopefully Google will clarify this soon.

Citations

Google Blog Post About Product Reviews Update

Product reviews update and your site

Google’s New Product Reviews Guidelines

Write high quality product reviews

John Mueller Discusses If Product Reviews Update Is Global

Watch Mueller answer the question at the 14:00 Minute Mark

[embedded content]

Searchenginejournal.com

Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending

en_USEnglish