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5 lektioner om att skapa video som ett proffs

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5 Lessons on Creating Video Like a Pro


If getting better at working with video is on your content marketing to-do list for this year, you’re in good company. CMI’s most recent Video and Visual Storytelling Research finds 88% of marketers use videos for content marketing, and 60% anticipate spending more on video this year than they did a year ago. Yet, nearly half indicate they weren’t using video to its full potential (48%).

What’s holding them back? Concerns about budget, lack of in-house technical skills, and limited management support sit at the top of the barriers. Once you clear those operational hurdles, there’s still the matter of how to plan, position, and promote your video stories to achieve optimal marketing performance.

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 In a recent Ask the CMWorld Community chat, Andrew Davis, best-selling author and internationally acclaimed speaker, shared the expertise acquired throughout his career, which spans the entertainment, marketing, and media industries.

Andrew believes with the right upfront preparation, attention to a few critical details, and some expert tips, any business can deliver high-quality, highly engaging video stories – no matter how much or little they invest in developing it.

The right preparation, attention to critical details, and adherence to some expert tips can deliver highly engaging #video stories, says @DrewDavisHere via @joderama @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

Watch the video below for the full conversation, and then read on for some expert tips and shortcuts to streamline your technical processes, sharpen your creative focus, and improve the marketing results from your video content.

Notera: Andrew references a video throughout the conversation, which is included below to provide the necessary context for readers:

Lesson 1: Make sure you have a good writer

Unless you direktsändning, you need a good writer to craft the stories before you film them. A skilled scriptwriter can help ensure the visual imagery aligns with and reinforces the key points.

Andrew points to another reason high-quality writing is instrumental: It can help you set realistic expectations around your technical capabilities, making production more efficient.

A good writer should craft the stories before you film them, says @DrewDavisHere via @joderama @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

He explains the writer’s creative choices set the stage for many filming requirements, such as:

  • Equipment – Will you need a wide-angle lens? Will filming with your phone be an option? Would you need to rent a drone for aerial shots?
  • Production work – Will you need someone who can scout locations and handle permit applications?
  • Specialized editing skills – Will you need someone with animation experience? Special effects expertise?

En experienced writer also can point to areas that may be challenging to execute (creatively or financially) and come up with viable workarounds. For example, if the initial idea requires aerial camera work or expensive props, the writer can think about ways to script the story to avoid those costly concepts. “Don’t worry about technical stuff until you have a script you’re happy with,” Andrew says.

Lesson 2: Map out your words and images in advance

Like most content marketing assets, videos start as ideas – they likely will get refined, revised, and reworked numerous times before deployment.

Yet, video workflows are more complex than most text-based content. You need to take steps in advance, such as establishing your filming locations and scenery, managing production tasks, such as text overlays, interstitial graphics, and B-roll), and securing technical equipment and expertise, such as editing software and a skilled editor who can turn the raw footage into a cohesive story.

Unlike a blog article or email campaign where you can make small changes and republish almost in an instant, fixing an error or updating a scene in a video can create a ripple effect of time-consuming and costly tasks.

Fixing an error in a #video can create a ripple effect of time-consuming and costly tasks, says @DrewDavisHere via @joderama @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

To avoid those late-game budget busters, Andrew suggests mapping everything – from the copy for the vocal track and the imagery and actions in each scene to the props and anything else your team might need to bring your story to life on video.

Andrew uses a simple, two-column template Word document. He lists each shot he plans to capture. In the left column, he details the audio features, including the spoken script and background sounds or music. On the right, he notes the visual features, including camera angles, B-roll footage, on-camera actions, props, and captions or other effects. He refers to this outline as “a recipe for creating the best possible video for his purpose.”

Here’s what Andrew’s template looks like:

However, if videos are an ongoing focal point of your content marketing, you may invest in a dedicated screenwriting app (like Scrivener eller WriterDuet), which provides more scripting templates.

Screenwriting apps such as @ScrivenerApp or @WriterDuet provide more scripting templates, says @DrewDavisHere via @joderama @CMIContent. Klicka för att tweeta

The key is to match up all your audio and video details before filming each shot. As Andrew explains: “When I first started out, I didn’t do this. Then I would realize I didn’t have the shots I needed to make the video really good or that I forgot to say something and would have to reshoot or figure out how to sandwich it in.”

Identifying potential problems and addressing them before committing them to video also prevents editing costs from skyrocketing due to revisions.  

Once you have your “recipe” mapped, print and share it with both on-camera talent and video editors, Andrew says. It gives everyone the clarity they need before it’s time for them to do their work, which will make for a better product.

DRICKS: Do a little online research to learn standard film terminology – like B-roll (background footage), transitions (elements that create smooth segues between scenes), and SFX (sound effects). Use that lingo in your script. “If you can learn the shorthand, you’ll get much more efficient at communicating your vision to your editors,” Andrew says.


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Lesson 3: Gear up for the gig

Filming on the fly using your phone camera might be sufficient for livestreaming or publishing spontaneous conversations. However, this isn’t ideal for producing more detailed or polished stories.

For a higher-quality standard, use specialized filming equipment. Andrew stresses that investing in the höger gear is more important than investing in the best gear – especially when you’re starting out.

Investing in the right gear is more important than investing in the best gear, especially when you’re starting out, says @DrewDavisHere via @joderama @CMIContent. #Video Klicka för att tweeta

Though some video tech will be determined by whether you record solo or with a team, Andrew recommends everybody have these tools (in addition to a camera) available when recording:

  • Prompter and stand: You can use an iPad or other tablet to display your script. Use a stand to hold it steady and at eye level so your talent can see it clearly. If no one can scroll the script for the on-camera person, get a small Bluetooth connection remote control device that can be hidden in your hand.
  • Headphones: Earbuds – the kind you might use for a Zoom call – work great for this, as they’ll block out some of the background noise that might distract you without making it obvious you’re wearing them.
  • Tripod: Like your prompter stand, a tripod ensures your camera is steady during still shots and can swivel smoothly when the subject moves. It can prevent bouncy or jarring motions that interfere with the viewing experience.
  • Wireless microphone. Your camera might have an internal microphone, but if you’re filming outside a controlled studio environment, you want to minimize background noise and make sure the voices are as clear as possible. The best bet is a small lavalier mic that can clip to the subject’s collar.
  • External camera monitor. To see what the camera sees, use a monitor. You can make sure you aren’t moving outside the shot or wasting battery life on some clown who walks by and decides they want to insert themselves into your scene. Though your camera might have a flip-down screen for this purpose, a large, battery-operated monitor that attaches to the camera will make your life easier.
  • Cords and extra batteries – for all your gear. You never want to get to your filming location and realize you forgot an essential cable or dongle or discover a dead battery with no way to recharge it.

Lesson 4: Check yourself before you wreck your video

Dead batteries aren’t the only thing that can ruin your filming plans. In fact, Andrew says you need to check a lot of small but important details before the cameras roll. “I cannot tell you how many times I have realized after filming, like, for 20 minutes that the microphone is not working or that I’m out of focus,” he says.

Time is money on a video shoot. So, while a seasoned pro like Andrew has developed a mental checklist, he runs through as he sets up each new shot, he suggests having a written reference when you’re starting out.

If you’re filming at an in-home or -office studio, Andrew offers a few more questions for the checklist:

  • Did you close the doors to the room in which you’re recording?
  • Did you yell, “Quiet on the set,” so everyone in the house/studio knows you’re recording?
  • Did you notify people who may enter the building after the recording starts by text or sign about the video production?
  • Did you remember to silence your phone (and any other devices in the room)?
  • Did you crank the air conditioning? Between the lights and nerves, things can really heat up when you’re on camera. You won’t want to make everyone stop in the middle of a scene so you can wipe off your sweat or turn the thermostat down a few degrees.
  • Did you yell, “That’s a wrap,” so everyone knows they can go back to normal?

Lesson 5: Make strategic, data-driven creative choices

Andrew estimates he and his team put in about 40 hours to create a video. That might seem like a lot of time, especially in an era where livestream videos can go from idea to on-air in minutes.

Most of those spots run between 30 seconds and six minutes. Andrew’s videos typically run between seven and 10 minutes. Why doesn’t he produce shorter pieces? It’s all about his strategic goals. Andrew says:

The real core of my audience doesn’t want a superficial marketing tip and trick because they can get a million of those elsewhere online. I’m trying to help people think strategically about the marketing they’re doing and how to deliver a better customer experience. To me, that [requires lengthier videos]. I think it also helps to take people on a real journey.

Andrew doesn’t take his creative cues from industry standards, assumptions, or rules of thumb about audience content preferences. Rather, he creates videos based on what his audience tells him resonates directly or through metrics. Here are a few ways he gathers that feedback:

  • Audience retention rates: He compares the retention rates for each video on his YouTube channel. For example, one popular video showed a retention rate of 50% – meaning half of those who viewed the video watched until its completion. For videos that don’t reach that retention rate, he does a deeper dive into their creative and technical details, such as length, topic, title, and tags, to learn what might not have worked as well.
  • Subscriber responses: Andrew includes länkar to his videos in Loyalty Loop, a weekly email newsletter. He tracks direct replies to those emails: “Lots of people click, open, and watch it, but the people who respond – especially when it’s about something that really hit a chord – help me understand what’s working because it tells me what they’re liking, what’s challenging them, and what are they learning,” he says.
  • Comments: Andrew also mines the comments viewers leave on the YouTube page and below his LinkedIn posts where he shares the link.
HANDPLOCKAT RELATERAT INNEHÅLL: 21 YouTube SEO Tools To Boost Your Video Rankings

Create winning videos – without losing your mind

A little extra efficiency in your video creation processes can add up to big marketing gains – in content quality, audience engagement, and video performance. Follow Andrew’s pro tips and let us know how it goes. If you have some video planning and preparation tips to share, why not pop them into the comments below?

All tools are identified by the author or sources. Feel free to include additional tools in the comments (from your company or ones that you have used). 

Want to learn how to balance, manage, and scale great content experiences across all your essential platforms and channels? Join us at ContentTECH Summit this March in San Diego. Browse the schedule eller register today. Use the code BLOG100 to save $100.

Omslagsbild av Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute





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MARKNADSFÖRING

Local Pack Header Specificitet försvinner medan Local Packs går nedåt

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9 Local Search Developments You Need to Know About from Q3 2022

Författarens åsikter är helt hans eller hennes egna (exklusive den osannolika händelsen av hypnos) och återspeglar kanske inte alltid Moz åsikter.

In July of this year, Dr. Peter J. Meyers and I published a report analyzing an element of Google’s local results we termed “local pack headers”. About a month after publication, members of the local SEO community, like Colan Nielsen, began noticing that the extraordinary diversity of headings we had captured had suddenly diminished:

Today, I’m doing a quick follow-up to the manual portion of our earlier study in an effort to quantify and illustrate this abrupt alteration.

A total sea change in local pack headers

Between July and November of 2022, 83% of our previously-queried local pack headers underwent a complete transformation of nomenclature. Only 17% of the local pack headers were still worded the same way in autumn as they had been in the summertime. Here is a small set of examples:

In our manual analysis of 60 queries in July, we encountered 40 unique local pack headers – a tremendous variety. Now, all specificity is gone. For all of our queries, headings have been reduced to just 3 types: in-store availability, places, and businesses.

Entity relationships remain mysterious

What hasn’t changed is my sense that the logic underpinning which businesses receive which local pack header remains rather odd. In the original study, we noted the mystery of why a query like “karate” fell under the heading of “martial arts school” but a query for “tai chi” got a unique “tai chi heading”, or why “adopt dog” results were headed “animal rescue services” but “adopt bunny” got a pack labeled “adopt bunny”. The curious entity relationships continue on, even in this new, genericized local pack header scenario. For example, why is my search for “tacos” (which formerly brought up a pack labeled “Mexican restaurants”, now labeled this:

But my search for “oil change” gets this header:

Is there something about a Mexican restaurant that makes it more of a “place” and an oil change spot that makes it more of a “business”? I don’t follow the logic. Meanwhile, why are service area businesses, as shown in my search for “high weed mowing” being labeled “places”?

Surely high weed mowing is not a place…unless it is a philosophical one. Yet I saw many SABs labeled this way instead of as “businesses”, which would seem a more rational label, given Google’s historic distinction between physical premises and go-to-client models. There are many instances like this of the labeling not making much horse sense, and with the new absence of more specific wording, it feels like local pack headers are likely to convey less meaning and be more easily overlooked now.

Why has Google done this and does it matter to your local search marketing?

Clearly, Google decided to streamline their classifications. There may be more than three total local pack header types, but I have yet to see them. Hotel packs continue to have their own headings, but they have always been a different animal:

In general, Google experiments with whatever they think will move users about within their system, and perhaps they felt the varied local pack headers were more of a distraction than an aid to interactivity with the local packs. We can’t know for sure, nor can we say how long this change will remain in place, because Google could bring back the diverse headings the day after I publish this column!

As to whether this matters to your local search campaigns, unfortunately, the generic headers do obscure former clues to the mind of Google that might have been useful in your SEO. I previously suggested that local businesses might want to incorporate the varied local pack terms into the optimization of the website tags and text, but in the new scenario, it is likely to be pointless to optimize anything for “places”, “businesses”, or “in-store availability”. It’s a given that your company is some kind of place or business if you’re creating a Google Business Profile for it. And, your best bet for featuring that you carry certain products is to publish them on your listing and consider whether you want to opt into programs like Pointy.

In sum, this change is not a huge deal, but I’m a bit sorry to see the little clues of the diversified headers vanish from sight. Meanwhile, there’s another local pack trend going on right now that you should definitely be paying attention to…

A precipitous drop in overall local pack presence

In our original study, Google did not return a local pack for 18% of our manual July queries. By November, the picture had significantly changed. A startling 42% of our queries suddenly no longer displayed a local pack. This is right in line with Andrew Shotland’s documentation of a 42.3% drop from peak local pack display between August and October. Mozcast, pictured above, captured a drop from 39.6% of queries returning local packs on October 24th to just 25.1% on October 25th. The number has remained in the low-to-mid 20s in the ensuing weeks. It’s enough of a downward slope to give one pause.

Because I’m convinced of the need for economic localism as critical to healing the climate and society, I would personally like Google to return local packs for all commercial queries so that searchers can always see the nearest resource for purchasing whatever they need, but if Google is reducing the number of queries for which they deliver local results, I have to try to understand their thinking.

To do that, I have to remember that the presence of a local pack is a signal that Google believes a query has a local intent. Likely, they often get this right, but I can think of times when a local result has appeared for a search term that doesn’t seem to me to be obviously, inherently local. For example, in the study Dr. Pete and I conducted, we saw Google not just returning a local pack for the keyword “pickles” but even giving it its own local pack header:

If I search for pickles, am I definitely looking for pickles near me, or could I be looking for recipes, articles about the nutritional value of pickles, the history of pickles, something else? How high is Google’s confidence that vague searches like these should be fulfilled with a local result?

After looking at a number of searches like these in the context of intent, my current thinking is this: for some reason unknown to us, Google is dialing back presumed local intent. Ever since Google made the user the centroid of search and began showing us nearby results almost by default for countless queries, we users became trained not to have to add many (or any) modifiers to our search language to prompt Google to lay out our local options for us. We could be quite lazy in our searches and still get local results.

In the new context of a reduced number of searches generating local packs, though, we will have to rehabituate ourselves to writing more detailed queries to get to what we want if Google no longer thinks our simple search for “pickles” implies “pickles near me”. I almost get the feeling that Google wants us to start being more specific again because its confidence level about what constitutes a local search has suffered some kind of unknown challenge.

It’s also worth throwing into our thinking what our friends over at NearMedia.co have pointed out:

“The Local Pack’s future is unclear. EU’s no “self-preferencing” DMA takes effect in 2023. The pending AICOA has a similar language.”

It could be that Google’s confidence is being shaken in a variety of ways, including by regulatory rulings, and local SEOs should alltid expect change. For now, though, local businesses may be experiencing some drop in their local pack traffic and CTR. On the other hand, if Google is getting it right, there may be no significant loss. If your business was formerly showing up in a local pack for a query that didn’t actually have a local intent, you likely weren’t getting those clicks anyway because a local result wasn’t what the searcher was looking for to begin with.

That being said, I am seeing examples in which I feel Google is definitely getting it wrong. For instance, my former searches for articles of möbel all brought up local packs with headings like “accent chairs” or “lamps”. Now, Google is returning no local pack for some of these searches and is instead plugging an enormous display of remote, corporate shopping options. There are still furniture stores near me, but Google is now hiding them, and that disappoints me greatly:

So here’s today’s word to the wise: keep working on the organic optimization of your website and the publication of helpful content. Båda kommer att underbygga dina viktiga lokala paketrankningar, och som vi lärde oss från vår senaste storskalig granskning av lokala företag, 51% av konsumenter kommer att hamna på din webbplats som nästa steg efter att ha läst recensioner på dina listor. 2023 kommer att bli ett bra år att investera i det varma och inkluderande välkomnande som din webbplats erbjuder människor, och investeringen kommer också att stå dig väl tillrätta, men lokala förpackningselement som rubriker eller till och med lokala förpackningar, själva, växer och avtar.



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