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17 Actionable Content Marketing Tips for 2022

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17 Actionable Content Marketing Tips for 2022


Just can’t get your content marketing program to work?

Fret not. Here’s a list of 17 tips that’ll improve your content marketing and help you get more visitors, leads, and sales:

  1. Know who you’re creating content for
  2. Target topics with search traffic potential
  3. Tackle competitors’ best-performing topics
  4. Prioritize topics using “business potential”
  5. Match the 3 Cs of search intent
  6. Create a content calendar
  7. Promote your content
  8. Design shareable images
  9. Repurpose your content
  10. Add “link triggers”
  11. Update your content
  12. Do blogger outreach
  13. Be opinionated
  14. Shine new light on industry with other lenses
  15. Don’t obsess over word count
  16. Manage a portfolio of content
  17. Create content hubs

1. Know who you’re creating content for

A conversion rate optimization (CRO) agency writes about CRO and attracts other CRO professionals. But CRO professionals don’t need CRO services. So the agency’s blog attracts no useful leads, and the agency declares that content marketing doesn’t work.

But if the CRO agency had taken a few steps back and written down who it was trying to target, it would be clear what kind of content it had to create. Not “advanced CRO tactics,” but “how to optimize your homepage to get more leads.”

That is why the first step of creating any content strategy is to be clear on who you’re creating content for.

Content strategy canvas

If you already know who you’re targeting, make sure to get it down in writing and share it with your entire team. Otherwise, use the template below to figure it out for your business.

Recommended reading: Hur man skapar detaljerade köparpersonas för ditt företag [Gratis persona-mall]

2. Target topics with search traffic potential

Traffic from email or social media is a great boost, but it is short-lived.

Spike of hope followed by flatline of nope

However, if you create content around topics that people are constantly searching for in Google, then there’s guaranteed continued interest. For as long as your article ranks in Google, you’ll receive consistent, passive search traffic.

Spike of hope followed by search traffic

Here’s how to find these topics:

  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer
  2. Enter a topic relevant to your industry
  3. Go to the Matching terms report
  4. Switch to the Questions tab
Questions report in Keywords Explorer

Here, you’ll see over 300,000 potential topics you could target. Look through the list and pick out those that are relevant to your website.

Recommended reading: Keyword Research: The Beginner’s Guide by Ahrefs

3. Tackle your competitors’ best-performing topics

Wouldn’t it be amazing if you knew which of your competitors’ articles got the most traffic so that you could replicate their success?

Well, good news. You can.

Here’s how:

  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Site Explorer
  2. Enter a competitor’s domain
  3. Go to the Top pages report
Top Pages report in Site Explorer

You’ll see all the pages ranked by organic traffic, plus the keyword that sends each page the most traffic.

For example, we can see that Beardbrand’s article on beard styles gets an estimated 105,000 organic visits per month. The keyword sending it the most traffic is “beard styles.”

If we owned a competing ecommerce store, we could tackle this topic too.

4. Prioritize topics using “business potential”

Search traffic alone is a vanity metric. If it doesn’t improve your business (i.e., more leads or more revenue), then getting more search traffic is pointless.

At Ahrefs, we score topics using “business potential.”

Business potential scale

Pairing “business potential” with “search traffic potential” keeps us focused on creating content that actually drives growth.

This is why our blog revolves around SEO and content marketing and not topics like “reverse image search.”

Search volume for 'reverse image search'

Even though it is a popular search query (~1.5 million monthly searches) and has the potential to drive tons of traffic, it has nothing to do with our product at all (“0” business potential).

5. Match the 3 Cs of search intent

Google’s aim is to provide its users with the most relevant search results for any search query. So, to rank high on Google, you need to show that you’re the most relevant search result. 

That means matching search intent—the why behind a search query.

We can look at Google’s search engine results pages (SERPs) to figure out search intent. Do this by searching in Google for your target keyword, then analyze the top-ranking pages for the three Cs of search intent.

A. Content type

Content types usually fall into one of five buckets: blog post, product, category, landing page, or video. For example, if we search for “how to learn hangul,” we can see that the top few results are mostly videos.

Content type - search intent

If you want to rank for this keyword, you’ll likely have to create a video.

B. Content format

Content format applies mostly to blog posts, as they’re usually either how-tos, listicles, news articles, opinion pieces, or reviews.

For example, the top-ranking results for “best home workouts” are mostly listicles:

Listicle content format - search intent

Whereas the top results for “how to learn Korean grammar” are mostly how-tos and guides:

How to content format - search intent

To stand the best chance of ranking, follow suit.

C. Content angle

Content angle refers to the main “selling point” of the content. For example, people searching for “how to make sangria” want the recipe to be easy.

'Easy' content angle - search intent

Recommended reading: What is Search Intent? A Complete Guide for Beginners

6. Create a content calendar

We keep track of all our publishing efforts using a content calendar:

Example of Ahrefs' content calendar

Each calendar entry also lists information about an individual content piece, such as:

  • Topic
  • Author
  • Contributors
  • Status
  • Due date
  • Images
  • URL slug
  • Category

And so on.

Example of content calendar fields

This keeps everyone aligned on the entire content management process. The editor and every contributor know what stage they’re at, when the deadline is, and what needs to be done next.

This is the reason why we have been able to publish two or more blog posts every week for the past few years.

Even if you’re a solo content marketer, a content calendar keeps you honest about the process. No more writing only when inspiration strikes. Commit to a schedule and publish.

Recommended reading: How to Create a Content Calendar That Works for You

If you don’t put your content in front of people who care, your newly published content will be practically invisible.

At Ahrefs, we promote every piece of content we publish. At the minimum, we:

  • Send new blog posts to our newsletter subscribers.
  • Share it on all our social accounts (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn).
  • Reach out to people we mention in our content.
  • Run ads (Facebook, Twitter, Quora, etc.).

You’ll have to do at least this much to get your content out—or if you’re a new site, even more. We recommend following this content promotion checklist:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoVYweKH4ck

8. Design shareable images

We’re big fans of creating custom images for our content. These images help simplify complex concepts and improve our content’s readability.

Infographic about what makes a good link

One of our custom images.

Plus, they make amazing content to share on social media. Even in a “boring” niche like SEO, images like this can go viral.

Our images are created by our in-house illustrators. But there’s no need for you to break the bank just to design them. Custom images don’t have to be museum-worthy to be shareable. After all, the popular blog WaitButWhy uses only stick figures and hand-drawn cartoons. Tools like Canva also make it easy to create one.

Example of a shareable image from waitbutwhy

Before publishing, give your content a once-over. Pick out places where a custom image can add “value,” e.g., illustrate a concept better, push the narrative forward, keep the content entertaining, etc.

9. Repurpose your content

Make your content go the extra mile—turn it into multiple formats and share it on different platforms.

For example, we turned our guide to influencer marketing into a video and our video on getting more YouTube subscribers into a blog post.

We also:

As content marketer Ross Simmonds puts it, “Create once, distribute forever.”

10. Add “link triggers”

Links are one of Google’s top three ranking factors. If you want your content to rank high, you need links.

One way—besides link building—is to bake “link triggers” (the reason why people link to a certain piece of content) into your content when writing. Not only will this make it easier to reach out and build links, but it can also help in naturally attracting them.

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer
  2. Search for your target keyword and scroll to the SERP overview
  3. Find a similar article with lots of referring domains
  4. Click on the number in the Backlinks column
  5. Skim the Anchor and target URL column for commonalities
Top results for 'SEO copywriting' via Keywords Explorer

For example, if we do this for Backlinko’s (aka Brian Dean) post on SEO copywriting, we see quite a few people are linking because of some unique tips Brian wrote about—APP method, bucket brigades, etc.

Link triggers for 'SEO copywriting'

If we write about the same topic, we’ll have to create our own unique SEO copywriting tips too.

Content can go “bad.” Information can become outdated, your target keyword’s search intent can change, and your rankings can drop.

When that happens, you’ll have to update your content.

Do you update everything? No, especially if you have hundreds of blog posts like us. Instead, you’ll have to prioritize. Do that by following this flowchart:

Flowchart for deciding whether to republish content

Alternatively, you can also use our free WordPress SEO plugin to check your site for underperforming posts. Then follow the guide below to learn the best way to republish your content.

Recommended reading: Republishing Content: How to Update Old Blog Posts for SEO

Blogger outreach is the process of putting your product or content in front of relevant bloggers and journalists by sending them personalized emails.

The goal: convince people with access to large audiences to talk about you and link to your website.

Now, blogger outreach is not spam. It’s not permission to scrape the emails of everyone in your industry and reach out to them begging for a link.

Instead, it’s something more long term. Sure, you want something from them—that’s why you’re reaching out. But you also want to network, remain on their radar, and befriend them. Rather than burn bridges for just a tweet, you’ll want to build on the relationship so that it may lead to something more in the future: a collaboration, partnership, etc.

So how do you do high-quality blogger outreach?

We wrote a start-to-finish guide on how to do it (and do it at scale too), so I recommend giving it a read.

Recommended reading: Blogger Outreach: How to Do It at Scale (Without Feeling Like a Jerk)

We all want our content to rank on Google and generate search traffic. But you can go too far playing that game. And unfortunately, many websites do. That’s why the SERPs are littered with pieces of content that look exactly like each other.

Don’t forget: Ranking is merely one part of the equation. Eventually, the reader needs to consume your content and buy into what you’re selling. If you’re just one of many, then there’s no reason to sign up for your email list, try a free trial, or purchase your product. You have to stand out.

Standing out means sharing an opinion. Wirecutter stands out from all other affiliate websites because it shares opinions, e.g., here’s the best non-stick pan, the best wireless earphone, the best DSLR camera, etc.

Example of an opinion on Wirecutter

We regularly share our opinions on our blog too. For example, my colleague, Michal Pecanek, confidently stated that there are some popular SEO metrics that just don’t matter:

Example of an opinion on the Ahrefs blog

14. Shine a new light on your industry with other lenses

Finance is not really my thing. Yet I’ve read almost every article written by the finance writer Morgan Housel. You would too—if you read his articles:

Example of a well-written article

He’s writing about finance, but it isn’t a borefest written in Wall Street language. He educates you from a variety of angles: history, psychology, biology, space, and war. Finance is merely the canvas he paints on; his brushes are the other lenses he uses to introduce you to the topic.

Your industry may be “boring,” but don’t let your content be.

Find another lens you can use to look at your industry in a new way. For example, Animalz wrote about content marketing from the lens of a black hole.

As Morgan puts it:

The key to persuasion is teaching people something new through the lens of something they already understand. This is critical in writing. Readers want to learn something new, and they learn best when they can relate a new subject to something they’re familiar with. 

15. Don’t obsess over word count

Reading a recipe page today means finishing the equivalent of Leo Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” before finally learning how to cook that three-minute dish.

This happens because of the popular belief that longer articles mean more organic traffic. But according to our study of 900 million pages, there is a moderate negative correlation between word count and organic traffic for posts longer than 2,000 words.

In other words, the average 10,000-word post gets less search traffic than the average 2,000-word post.

The correlation between organic traffic and word count

So stop obsessing over word count. Nobody wants to read longer content. Cover as deep as needed, cut out the unimportant aspects, and get to the point.

16. Manage a portfolio of content

You cannot expect each piece of content you create to hit all your content marketing goals. Just like in finance, you need to diversify.

Depending on the goals and priorities of your business, you may need the following:

  • Search-optimized content
  • Linkbait
  • Sales enablement content
  • Thought leadership content

And more.

Even though ranking on Google is important for us, content designed for ranking isn’t the only type of content we create. We also publish data studies (for thought leadership and links), product updates (for retention), opinion pieces (for thought leadership), and free tools (for generating direct leads).

Recommended reading: Risk vs. Reward: How to Build a Diversified Content Portfolio

We recently organized our best free guides into one main starting point for all our readers.

Example of a content hub

This is known as a content hub. Content hubs are interlinked collections of content about a similar topic. Here’s how it looks like, in theory:

What a content hub looks like

Since our blog is displayed reverse chronologically, a hub page like this helps our readers discover more of our content in an organized manner.

If you have tons of amazing content, consider creating hub pages to link all of them together.

Recommended reading: Content Hubs for SEO: How to Get More Traffic and Links

Slutgiltiga tankar

I hope you’ve walked away from this post with a handful of actionable content marketing tips you can apply to your business.

Did I miss out on any cool content marketing tips? If you have any to share, let me know på Twitter.





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SEO

10 verktyg du kan använda för SEO-konkurrensanalys

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10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive Analysis

A successful search engine optimization strategy includes competitive analysis. The tools available today offer incredible value at generally reasonable fees.

They help users accomplish more in less time, and many may find that the tools are so useful that they essentially end up paying for themselves. Here are 10 popular SEO competitive analysis tools, their pricing, and how you can use them to bolster the success of your SEO strategy.

1. Semrush

  • Pricing: Plans start at $119.95 per month.

Semrush not only offers good data for search results analysis, but everything functions the way you expect it to – it’s that easy to use.

There is no need to read a manual to use Semrush’s SERP analysis tool.

Every link, button, and heading has a tooltip that explains what it is so that everything makes sense.

Semrush Tooltip Explains SERP Analysis Tool Data

Screenshot from Semrush, January 2023

Semrush Tooltip Explains Jargon

10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive AnalysisScreenshot from Semrush modified by author, January 2023

Semrush’s Authority Score is assigned to every URL listed in the SERP Analysis.

Like any third-party metric, the Authority Score is just a score based on factors like backlinks, traffic, and referring domains.

The metric makes it easy to make a quick judgment about a webpage without having to spend hours researching all of the factors for each webpage.

The research is already done; that’s what Semrush’s Authority Score is about.

That’s just one part of the Semrush SERP analysis, but it’s the part that is directly tied to competitor research.

Semrush is useful for researching competitor backlinks. The ease of use makes the workflow of researching links a pleasure.

There’s no need to read a manual. Everything is self-explanatory.

Starting an analysis consists of entering a domain name or an entire URL.

The resulting page shows various metrics that help you see the competition at a glance, literally.

There’s a graph that shows the growth of referring domains and also backlinks by year, which provides a quick idea of how aggressively they’re building links, organized by time.

10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive AnalysisScreenshot from Semrush modified by author, January 2023

Beneath that graph, there’s another visual representation of the backlinks organized by the categories of referring domains.

The categories are the general niche areas that the backlinks belong to.

10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive AnalysisScreenshot from Semrush, January 2023

When you click through a category, the tool presents a filter where you can add a word, a phrase, or a TLD, which means Top Level Domain (.net or .org), to find all the relevant links.

There’s also a drop-down menu for selecting “zones by TLD,” but I found that typing in the TLD works better.

Or you can get granular and click on the View Full Report button to see all of the categories in granular detail.

It’s easy to recommend Semrush because it truly is designed for researching competitors and for link building.

The tools for competitive research are easy to use and give a visual snapshot of their activities and offer a useful user interface for drilling down by category.

2. Ahrefs SERP Checker (Free And Paid)

  • Pricing: Free checker tool, then starts at $99 per month.

Ahrefs has a free SERP checker that shows the same SERP data as the paid version, only for just the first few positions.

The paid version has more data. But if you’re on a budget, the free version is a useful start.

Below is a screenshot of the SERP overview that lists featured snippets, people also ask, and the sitelinks enhancements.

This extra data gives a good overview of what the SERPs look like, plus page and domain rating metrics.

10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive AnalysisScreenshot from Ahrefs, December 2022

Here is a screenshot showing more data from the SERP analysis tool.

All of the column headings show a tooltip that explains what each column means.

10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive AnalysisScreenshot from Ahrefs, December 2022

Ahrefs is a solid choice for search results competitor analysis.

3. Serpstat

  • Pricing: Free version, then starts at $69 per month.

Serpstat is an affordably priced SEO platform that offers SERP analysis tools. It’s possible to sign up for free to test it out.

Serpstat is focused on analyzing the search results and is useful for Backlinks Analysis and Competitor Analysis.

4. SpyFu

  • Pricing: Free analysis tool, then starts at $39 per month (or $16 per month on an annual plan).

SpyFu is a very reasonably priced service that is dedicated specifically to competitive research and offers many useful features.

The benefit of the tool is that it generates all the data necessary for competitive research.

SpyFu basically takes the “research” part out of competitive research tasks and provides the data.

The SERP Analysis tool, which can be used for free, offers unique information, such as indicators that signal a website rises or drops in the search results.

10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive AnalysisScreenshot from SpyFu, January 2023

Another interesting feature is that it offers a Ranking Difficulty score, data on whether .gov or .edu sites are ranking, and the number of homepages that are ranking in the top 100 positions.

10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive AnalysisScreenshot from SpyFu modified by author, January 2023

SpyFu Backlinks Report

Another unique feature is how SpyFu identifies what it determines are the strongest webpages to get a link from.

Just enter a keyword phrase into the search box, and SpyFu searches the backlinks of the top 5,000 ranked sites, including for similar keyword phrases, and identifies all the backlinking domains that the ranked sites have in common.

Even better, SpyFu allows users to filter those webpages by backlink types.

The backlink types one can filter for are .gov/.edu/, sites with affiliate links, blogs, news sites, forums, and directories.

Filtering for forums reveals all the strongest forum backlinks, filtering for .edu domains shows the best .edu sites to get a link from, and so on.

Another cool feature is called Backlink Kombat.

10 Tools You Can Use For SEO Competitive AnalysisScreenshot from SpyFu, January 2023

This tool allows you to enter two competitor domains and then exclude your own domain. It will then show you all the links the competitors have in common that your site does not.

I like using tools in creative ways to get even more or better data.

What I would suggest doing with the SpyFu Backlink Kombat tool is comparing sites that aren’t your direct competitors. This can help you discover opportunities you might not otherwise.

So if your topic is plumbers in City X, compare roofers in City X.

Competitor backlink research with SpyFu is incredibly easy. I would like the flexibility to filter by keywords (like Favorite Sites) or by TLD (to find .org or .us domains).

A limited amount of this data is free, and the complete data set is available to paid subscribers.

SpyFu is an interesting tool because it takes the extra step of presenting the data while minimizing research.

It’s easy to use, specific to competitor research, and reasonably priced.

5. Sandboxweb.io SERP Analysis Tool

  • Pricing: Free version, then pricing starts at $19 per month.

Sandboxweb.io offers a SERP analysis tool that provides data on top-ranked competitors.

This tool shows the schema types, Core Web Vitals data, and word counts.

You can click on each competitor in the SERP to research further.

The free version of this tool offers a lot of information. But it’s limited to 10 keywords per month.

The data is somewhat limited, but it does offer a quick analysis.

6. Screaming Frog

  • Pricing: Free version and a paid version at $209 per year.

Screaming Frog has a SERP analysis function. It’s not easy to use, but it’s not excessively difficult.

I’d like to see Screaming Frog make it easier to run this kind of analysis without getting technical.

If you take the time to figure it out, Screaming Frog can scrape the SERPs and provide analysis.

It’s also useful for analyzing competitors one at a time to get a sense of what sites they link to, how much content they have, interlinking patterns, headings used across the site, and many other competitor data points.

7. Inlinks

  • Pricing: Free version, then pricing starts at $39 per month.

Inlinks is a content optimization-focused tool that can extract relevant data points from search results and competitors.

Inlinks features a SERP analysis function that offers multiple data points about the sites in the search results, such as semantically related topics and user intent data.

The user intent data and topic suggestion features are quite unique.

There is also a Topic Analysis feature that provides competitors’ related topics and other data that is useful for creating content.

Other SERP Analysis tools look at the top 100 through the top 5,000 for their analyses.

But in my opinion, what really matters most are the top 10 search results because not every site in the top 100 or even the top 10 is a competitor.

So, I really appreciate that Inlinks’ SERP analysis tool focuses on the top 10.

The Inlinks SERP analysis tool offers data on the following:

  • Topic density.
  • Internal and external link counts.
  • Readability scores.
  • List of H2 headings.

I asked one of the founders, Dixon Jones, to explain what Inlinks does regarding competitor analysis.

Dixon answered:

“Inlinks analyzes ten competing pages for any Keyword. It aggregates the combined number of times entities are used in the SERP and uses this to build a Knowledge Graph of entities related to a given search.

This is then compared to the entities in the content on YOUR competing page, highlighting material gaps in your content.

At a site level, Inlinks can build a knowledge graph of any site, but does not currently have many tools to compare whole sites.

We look at the verbs used to describe entities (in competing pages for a SERP) and cluster them into verb based intent.

This helps content publishers answer a genuine user query, rather than use words in the wrong context.”

Inlinks offers more tools; it’s more than just competitor analysis.

There is a free, pro, and enterprise level.

8. MarketMuse

  • Pricing: Free version and paid plans starting at $600 per month.

MarketMuse is an AI-based content analysis tool that functions within the entire content creation workflow, from research to content brief and more.

What I appreciate about MarketMuse is that it looks at the top-ranked pages and offers a keyword overview of the topics.

A key competitor analysis function in MarketMuse is called Compete.

The Compete tool analyzes the competition and suggests what to write about and ways to do better than the competitors, such as covering overlooked related topics.

Compete’s unique selling proposition, in my opinion, is that it is focused on helping users create content that is better than the competition.

My understanding of MarketMuse is that it’s not just focused on helping users beat their competition.

The tool streamlines the entire content creation workflow, with competitor research being one part of the process.

There is a learning curve to MarketMuse.

9. SimilarWeb

  • Pricing: Free version and paid plans starting at $167 per month for the starter package.

SimilarWeb is a unique competitor analysis tool.

It’s focused less on SEO and more on providing a clear image of the differences between the two websites.

There are multiple data points related to traffic, keywords, traffic share by country, and even a comparison of audience demographics.

SimilarWeb offers a free and paid version.

The free version offers a generous amount of data that helps users compare competitors.

10. LinkResearchTools

  • Pricing: Starts at $599 per month. One-week trial for $17.

LinkResearchTools is an enterprise-class link research tool.

It’s the most sophisticated and comprehensive link-building tool I’ve ever used.

One of the qualities I like most is that it feels like it has a comprehensive inventory of crawled links.

The tool makes it easy to find links with normal searching, like adding a TLD, but you can also find links multiple sites have in common.

Most of the functionality is geared toward businesses that want to disavow backlinks, which is useless for link builders.

I’d like to see a tool that does away with all of the link-disavowing-related features and just focuses on researching competitor backlinks.

One can subscribe to most of the other lower-priced tools and use their combined competitor backlink research features and still pay less than LinkResearchTools.

For most people, that’s more than enough.

But the data in LinkResearchTools is, in my experience, possibly the most comprehensive backlink data available.

Backlink Analysis

Backlink analysis is more than just poaching keywords from competitors.

It’s a way to understand what the barrier to entry might be, which means how easy or difficult it might be to compete.

Competitor links can be a starting point for building better links as well.

Sometimes a group of links might stand out, giving you an idea of a direction to take.

Doing solid link building requires a flexible backlink analysis tool.

Competitor Research

There are many useful SEO tools available today. They don’t do the SEO for you, but they make it easier to accomplish better results faster.

The tools also provide time-saving access to a huge amount of data that would ordinarily take days to compile.

Saving time, being more productive, and having the data to make informed decisions is the hallmark of all of these SEO tools.


Utvald bild: Paulo Bobita/Search Engine Journal



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An In-Depth Guide For Beginners

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An In-Depth Guide For Beginners

Every month, 2.98 billion people around the globe open up their laptops or smart devices and navigate their way to Facebook.

That’s roughly a quarter of everyone in the world, visiting the same social media platform, every single day.

Mark Zuckerberg likely didn’t imagine such astounding reach in his wildest dreams when he launched the first iteration of what would become the world’s most popular social networking site in 2003.

These days, nearly everyone uses Facebook, and it’s become as much a part of daily life as watching television.

For marketers, this means a massive opportunity to reach and engage with new audiences.

But you can’t just set up a company page and hope to attract millions of followers. You need a plan to capitalize on these opportunities and make the maximum impact.

If you’re a Facebook marketing beginner, this may sound like a daunting task, but don’t worry – it’s easier than you think.

Continue reading for an in-depth guide to Facebook marketing that you can use to get started right away.

What Is Facebook Marketing?

Facebook marketing is the process of using the social media platform to promote your business to potential buyers.

There are a variety of ways to do this, both paid and organic.

Paid Facebook marketing means using advertising campaigns within the platform to target people on the site and ideally, convert them into customers.

Organic marketing on Facebook occurs when you post content that your targets will find valuable, with the goal of increasing your following and engaging with your audience.

Why You Should Be Marketing On Facebook

If nearly 2 billion potential customers using Facebook didn’t entice you to create your own business profile, maybe this will: There are currently more than 200 million businesses already using Facebook’s free tools and apps.

And, of those, more than 3 million are actively advertising on the platform.

That means there’s a good chance your competition is already using this social media site to grow their business.

And if they’re not, jumping on board now will give you a serious edge over them.

So, with no further ado, let’s get started.

How To Set Up Facebook For Business

The very first thing you need to do to launch your marketing efforts on Facebook is to create a page for your business.

It’s free to set up and gives you a place for people to like or follow you. It also gives you a chance to engage with your customers (and potential customers), and share content with them via posts.

In your web browser, go to facebook.com/pages/create and select the category that best describes your organization. For most people, that’s going to be “Business or Brand.”

You’ll then be directed to a page where you can enter your brand’s name, select the category your business falls under, and add bio information.

If you’re a bit stuck on what to include in your bio, don’t worry – you can always change it later.

You’ll also have an opportunity to add a logo and cover image – again, don’t worry, these can be changed.

Next, you’ll be able to claim your unique URL, which will likely be something along the lines of facebook.com/TheNameOfYourBusiness.

The next step is an important one: editing your page info.

Make sure you provide all relevant details including your address, service hours, and other details customers and prospects might be looking for.

Congratulations – you’ve just created your Facebook business page. Now, it’s time to figure out how to use it for marketing.

How To Build A Facebook Marketing Strategy

As you probably already know, Facebook makes its money via advertising revenue. As such, it has made it simple for even the most technologically inept person to use it for marketing.

And this includes offering free information on how to create your own social media strategy.

You can read that helpful guide at your leisure, but for now, let’s break it down into eight steps:

  • Set your goals – What do you hope to accomplish via Facebook marketing? Facebook has three marketing objectives: awareness, consideration, and conversion.
  • Identify your audience – How old are they? Where do they live? What is their level of education? How can your offering solve their problem? Facebook lets your market with remarkable precision, so the more information you have on your targets, the better.
  • Plan your content – Decide what kind of things you’ll post. It could be industry news, behind-the-scenes pictures, or promotions – get as creative as you like. Just make sure you’re planning content your audience will like.
  • Create a content calendar – Decide when you will post specific pieces of content. Be as accurate as you can, right down to publishing time, because there will likely be times when your audience is more active.
  • Create your content – It’s time to put step three into action and create engaging pieces. Read this article for tips on keeping your content interesting and relevant.
  • Explore Facebook’s free tools – Facebook has several options for sharing content, including text, image, and video posts, as well as Stories and live streams.
  • Determine how you will use ads – You have multiple options for advertising on Facebook. We’ll go into them in more detail in the next section so you can choose what’s right for your needs.
  • Add the Facebook Pixel to your website – Don’t forget to add the tracking code to your website to collect data, enable retargeting, and track conversions.

Types Of Facebook Posts For Marketing

Facebook offers incredible flexibility when it comes to marketing, with numerous post and paid ad options.

Let’s first dive into the posts.

Facebook Marketing Post Types

The type of post you use when marketing on Facebook will depend on what you’re hoping to accomplish. Some of the more popular are:

  • Text posts or status updates – these are a great way to initiate conversations, share information, and educate your followers.
  • Photo posts – A great way to capture attention, images are useful for attracting new customers.
  • Video posts – Videos are a great way to engage with your audience and encourage interaction.
  • Facebook Live – Use the platform’s live streaming capabilities for product demonstrations, answering questions, or interacting with your followers.
  • Link posts – Use posts with direct links to your external website or blog. They include an automatic preview.
  • Stories – Just like Instagram Stories, Facebook Stories are great for building engagement without disrupting your followers’ feeds.
  • Pinned posts – Stuck at the top of your page, these are great for maximizing the reach of top-performing posts or relaying critical information, promotions, or events.

Once you have your business page set up and you’ve begun sharing content, the next phase of Facebook marketing is to venture into paid ads.

Facebook Ad Types

At the moment, there are four main types of ads on the platform:

Image Ads

Screenshot from Facebook, January 2023

These are static ads in JPG or PNG format. They should include a headline of up to 40 characters and the main text of 125 characters.

You also have a link description area which should be used for a clear and succinct CTA.

Image ads are easy to set up and work well for driving traffic to your website.

For a list of best practices for this ad format, click here.

Video Ads

Facebook Marketing: An In-Depth Guide For BeginnersScreenshot from Facebook, January 2023

Facebook video ads are a great way to boost your brand and don’t require expensive recording equipment or software. You can record these spots using your phone and there are a number of free editing apps that can help you.

Video ads can be placed in-stream (the short commercials that are shown before a video your target wants to watch), in-feed, or in Stories.

As a general rule of thumb, they should be under two minutes long and have an attention grabber within the first three seconds.

For more video best practices, click here.

Carousel Ads

Facebook Marketing: An In-Depth Guide For BeginnersScreenshot from Facebook, January 2923

Carousel ads combine multiple videos and images into a single ad, which is a great way to improve your chances of conversion.

They tend to work best for ecommerce brands, as they allow you to showcase multiple products or angles of a single product in one ad.

Ideally, these should point to a purpose-built landing page.

Here are some other best practices offered by Meta.

Collection Ads

Facebook Marketing: An In-Depth Guide For BeginnersScreenshot from Facebook, January 2023

Collection ads are another way for e-commerce brands to showcase products but are more similar to image ads than carousels.

You are restricted to a 40-character headline and a 125-character primary text.

Read about collection ads best practices here.

Which Goal Should I Focus on For Facebook Marketing?

The type of marketing that will work best for your brand depends on your goals.

As was mentioned previously, Facebook has three objectives that correspond with the top, middle, and bottom of the sales funnel, respectively:

Awareness

Facebook has two awareness objectives to help you expand your reach and generate interest:

  • Brand awareness – Used to entice a new audience or keep your brand top of mind. This usually results in little audience action.
  • Reach – Designed to reach as many people as possible within your ad budget.

Consideration

Consideration lets you choose from six objectives:

  • Traffic – Choose this objective when you want to increase the number of visitors to your external website.
  • Engagement – This is used to encourage people to like and comment on your posts, or respond to event invitations.
  • App promotion – Used to drive downloads of your app in Google Play or the App Store.
  • Video views – If you’re showcasing your brand or highlighting a unique value proposition (UVP). It’s also a good way to lay the groundwork for future retargeting.
  • Lead generation – Collect information about your customers and add them to your sales funnel.
  • Messages – Use this when you’re seeking to start conversations around your brand.

Conversions

Conversions lets you choose from three objectives:

  • Conversions – This could be making a purchase, signing up for a newsletter, or taking any other action.
  • Catalog sales – By connecting your e-commerce store with Facebook Ads, you can promote products from your catalog.
  • Store traffic – Use this to drive traffic to your physical location by targeting nearby potential customers.

Once you have determined your objectives, you can determine which format will work best to help you accomplish your goals.

From here, you’ll need to determine your budget and schedule. You can opt for either a daily or monthly budget, with the option for an end date for time-sensitive promotions.

Next, you’ll choose your audience – a process we’ll dive into in the next section – and select your placements.

If you’ve never placed ads on Facebook before, you will probably be best served by selecting Automatic Placements, which will allow the social media platform to determine where you’re likely to get the best results.

If you know what you’re doing, you can customize your placement and select things like device type and operating system.

When Not To Use Facebook Ads

There’s no question that running Facebook ad campaigns can be extremely beneficial. But it’s not a magical sales multiplier.

In fact, in some situations, it can be a complete waste of money – and Facebook Ads can be quite costly.

Here are some situations when you should not use Facebook Ads:

  • You’re unclear on your targeting – Nothing will blow through your ad spend faster, and with less to show for it, than going after the wrong demographic.
  • You’re not using your metrics – As with every marketing campaign, your Facebook Ads should be subject to measurement and A/B testing to find the optimal placement and format.
  • You don’t have anything worth sharing – To get engagement, your ads need to be compelling. It could be a unique product, a special event, or a sale, but people need a reason to click your ads.
  • Your landing page and ad are disconnected – If you’re promising one thing in your Facebook Ad and then delivering something different on your website, people will not follow through with your CTA.

Using Facebook Analytics

Facebook’s biggest value to marketers lies in its analytics capabilities via Facebook Insights.

To access it, go to your Page Manager and click on Insights.

You’ll be presented with quite a lot of data, created using a default range of 28 days. You can change this as needed.

The first thing you’ll likely want to check is the Overview tab, which will tell you how your page is performing. This gives you key metrics about your page and your most recent posts, and compares you to similar pages.

Use the Likes tab to see the averages, growth, and source of your likes to help you understand how your page is performing.

The Reach tab tracks how many people have seen your posts, their reactions, comments, and shares, as well as how many have hidden them or reported them as spam.

Page views help you identify where your traffic is coming from and how many views your posts are receiving.

Under the Actions of Page tab, you’ll get a report of what actions visitors took on your Facebook page, as well as demographic information on the people who clicked your phone number or website or took another action.

There are also separate tabs to tell you how your posts, events, and videos are performing on the platform.

The People tab gives you information about who saw and engaged with your posts or page. It gives you data on your fans, as well as reach and engagement numbers.

The Messages tab tracks Messenger analytics, including response time, while Promotions gives you an overview of recent sales and promotions.

Branded Content lists your mentions from Verified Pages (those with a blue checkmark).

Finally, there’s the Local tab, which while not relevant for strictly online businesses, is extremely valuable for any company with a physical location.

It gives you information about the foot traffic in your area, as well as demographic information about these people and the number of people nearby who saw your ads.

How To Create Great Facebook Campaigns

There is no question that Facebook can be an excellent marketing tool for virtually any organization.

But if you don’t pay attention to what you’re doing, it can also be an easy way to blow through your advertising budget in no time.

To ensure your Facebook marketing campaigns give you the biggest bang for your buck, here are some key takeaways to keep in mind:

  • Identify your audience and write to it – Keep your posts only as long as is required to persuade a target. Keep your ads within specified limits. Keep your CTAs short and to the point.
  • Don’t take a “one-size-fits-all” approach – Facebook allows you incredible targeting options. Use them. Highly targeted ads are going to perform much better than those that take a scattergun approach.
  • Have a good offer – Even the best copy and image can’t overcome a bad offer. Make sure you’re providing something people want.
  • Connect your visuals with your copy – Copy should reinforce your images and videos and vice versa. Make sure yours does.
  • Refine your strategy – You’re not going to get everything perfect for your first, second, or even hundredth Facebook campaign. In fact, there are no perfect campaigns. That means you should always be working on your strategy and content, striving to find something better.

Fler resurser:


Featured Image: Production Perig/Shutterstock



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SEO

7 Essential Tips & Tricks You Might Not Know

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7 Essential Tips & Tricks You Might Not Know

It may not look like one of the fancy, paid SEO tools you’re used to logging into, but Excel remains one of the most versatile and powerful tools in an SEO professional’s toolbox.

You can use Excel to track and analyze key metrics such as rankings, website traffic, and backlinks.

Use it to create and update meta tags, track and analyze competitors’ SEO strategies and performance, build automated reports, and take care of many of the data tasks you’ll encounter every day.

Combine your Excel knowledge with Python, Tableau, R, and other tools, and there is nothing you can’t do.

If you’ve never worked with data before, you’ll find Excel has a bit of a learning curve, but you can use it right from the start. And it’s flexible enough to scale and grow as your site grows.

Why Excel For SEO Tasks?

While many paid tools can help you do the same tasks, Excel is a fantastic option to enhance, combine, or replace those tools.

  • It’s affordable and comes with a range of tools you already use.
  • There are a ton of resources and courses to help you learn.
  • Easily handles large amounts of data.
  • Sorting and de-duplicating – a feature often missing when you need it.
  • Create and manage databases with simple formulas.
  • Data ports easily to other tools and is available for other tasks.
  • Pivot tables and smart charts.

1. Combine Multiple Data Sources

You will often find yourself having to merge data from multiple sources.

This is intuitive and quick in Tableau, Python, or R, but you can do the same in Excel using Power Query.

There are a few steps to this process, but it’s not as complicated as you might think – even if you are new to working with data or Excel.

Power Query has automated and simplified tasks that required a lot of time and skill.

And it is probably THE best Excel feature for business and SEO professionals.

Seem a bit daunting? Don’t worry. There are several courses and tutorials on YouTube to get you started.

What It’s Good For:

  • Building reports.
  • Analytics and sales data.
  • Combining data sources to identify opportunities and gain insights.

2. Data Cleaning

Much of your time is lost simply preparing data for analysis. It doesn’t have to be that way.

Large lists are often larger than they need to be. Finding and manually removing all the duplicates, however, can be a serious pain.

Excel can do this instantly for you. Simply go to the “Data” tab and click “Remove Duplicates.”

Screenshot from Excel, January 2023.

Unwanted spaces and blank lines tend to cause havoc with many tasks, formulas, and statistics.

Excel will remove them for you simply by going to Edit > Find > Go To. Select “Special,” “Blanks,” and tell Excel how it should handle them.

“Convert text to columns” can be a lifesaver, especially if you’ve received data where the addresses or names are all in the same cell or you need to extract domains from email addresses.

Go to Data > Text to Columns. Then, indicate what to use for Delimiters (comma or space) and preview the results. When you’re ready, click “Next,” choose a destination, and click “Finish.”

When To Use It:

  • Data analysis.
  • Data processing.
  • Processing and cleaning lead databases.
  • Working with any data.

 3. Power Excel With Add-On Tools

Some of the more complex tasks, such as crawling, require a bit of coding knowledge.

If you don’t have that in your skillset, however, there are tools you can download, integrate with other tools, and add on.

Power Excel With Add-On ToolsScreenshot from SEOTools, January 2023.

SEOTools offers off and on-page SEO tools, integrations, connectors, spiders, and several other tools that make it easy to customize your Excel and create custom projects.

SEOGadget brings the power of Moz, Grepwords, and Majestic to Excel.

Analysis ToolPak is for serious data analysis. This add-on improves and automates in-depth statistics, perfect for forecasting, trending, regression analysis, and more complex data analysis tasks you might otherwise perform in R or Python.

When To Use It:

  • Reporting.
  • Regular data analysis.
  • Presentations.
  • Integrating and coordinating with other teams.

4. Infographics And Charts

Data is useless if you can’t understand it.

In fact, data visualization and storytelling are likely some of the most important skills you can have. This is where tools like Power Query and PivotTables come in.

Built right into Excel, pivot tables are the other valuable tools you have for this purpose.

However, instead of just creating a straight pivot table and a related chart, save yourself some steps by creating a master “template” first that you can then replicate as needed and adjust to suit your needs.

Excel pivot tables for reportingScreenshot from Excel, January 2023.

In many instances, however, you will need to work with dates or segments of the data. For that, you’ll want to enter splicers and timelines.

  • To splice data into segments: Select the pivot table and go to PivotTable Tools > Analyze > Filter > Insert Slicer. Then, simply input how you would like to segment the content (e.g., by product or topic).
  • To utilize timelines: Click the pivot table’s tools option, go to Analyze > Filter > Insert Timeline. Once there, you can choose what you’d like to use, style it, add captions, and more.

If you’ve never used Excel’s PivotTables before, a short tutorial will have you on your way to analyzing data in no time.

Still want a little more? Make your reports, social media, and updates even better by upping your data visualization game with add-ons like People Graph.

When To Use It:

  • Reporting.
  • Daily updates.
  • Surface data analysis.
  • Team collaboration and integration.

5. Automate Common Tasks With Macros

SEO, particularly agency SEO, is full of repetitive tasks like weekly reporting that consume much of your time. Excel’s macros are the answer. And they’re really easy to use.

Under the “View” tab, click “Macros” and “Record Macro.”

Automate Common Tasks With MacrosScreenshot from Excel, January 2023.

Fill out the details.

The macro is now recording. So, simply walk through the steps that you’d like to automate. And when you’re done, go back to the ribbon and stop the recording.

When you’re ready to run the automation, go to the macro button in the ribbon, click “View Macros,” and select the desired macro from the list.

If you have some macros that you use more often than others, you can add them to the Quick Access Toolbar.

When To Use It:

  • Sorting.
  • Calculations.
  • Reformatting data.
  • Setting up new site documents or new pages for reports.

6. Easily Import Feeds And Data Into Excel

If you use Google Alerts or publish frequently, automatically importing feeds into Excel can be a huge time saver.

To start, simply grab the RSS feed address. (Or, create an alert for Google Alerts and have them delivered as an RSS feed.)

Importing rss feeds into google sheets for excelScreenshot from Google Sheets, January 2023.

Then, go to Google Sheets and use the IMPORTFEED function to bring the updates straight into a spreadsheet.

Alternatively, you can add the information to separate columns.

Importing rss feeds into excel through google sheetsScreenshot from Google Sheets, January 2023.

From here, you can regularly download and import the data into Excel, combine it with other related data, or integrate it into your custom dashboards.

If you need something a little more automatic, use Google Apps Script or one of the add-ons available to automate the process.

Want a little more data behind your reports? You can scrape and import Google Search Results into Excel, too.

7. Backlink Analysis

To analyze backlinks with Excel, collect backlink data with tools such as Ahrefs, Majestic, or Google Search Console.

Then, import it into Excel and use it to analyze your backlinks in a number of ways:

  • Who links to you: Use Excel’s sorting and filtering tools to filter the data and use the IF function: IF(logic, true_value,[false_value]) to sort and identify domains linking to you.
  • What do people link to: Sort and filter to see the anchor text used most often for your backlinks (using frequency/count).
  • When did people link to you: Organize the data by date to see how old your links are and when most of your backlinks were acquired.

Find trends or patterns in your backlink profiles with pivot tables, groups, charts, and graphs by combining your backlink and sales or conversion data.

Highlight specific data based on certain conditions with conditional formatting. This makes it easy to spot backlinks from high-authority websites or backlinks with specific anchor text.

Summary

Many people overlook Excel either because they think it’s too basic to be of much use. Or it looks too intimidating or daunting to learn.

But those of us who use it understand just how powerful it can be and the unlimited possibilities it provides.

Hopefully, these tips will help you craft better strategies, find new opportunities, and tell your story with better reports and dashboards.


Utvald bild: Paulo Bobita/Search Engine Journal



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