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Taiwanesiska popstjärnans röriga skilsmässa fångar kinesiskt internet

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Taiwanese pop star's messy divorce captures Chinese internet

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The online war of words between Taiwanese-American pop idol Wang Leehom and his now ex-wife Lee Jinglei has exploded in recent days – Copyright GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA/AFP Drew Angerer

Laurie CHEN

A Taiwanese pop star’s messy divorce has captivated the Chinese-speaking world with the allegations triggering debate on misogyny and abusive marriages in China, where social media discussion of kvinnor’s rights is increasingly tightly controlled.

The online war of words between Taiwanese-American pop idol Wang Leehom and his estranged wife Lee Jinglei has exploded in recent days, generating breathless tabloid coverage and daily social media fodder across China, Taiwan and Hong Kong.

It has also triggered none of the Chinese mainland’s censorship that kicked in when tennis star Peng Shuai alleged she had been sexually assaulted by a senior Communist Party official last month.

Lee’s anguished posts about her imploding marriage to Wang — one of Mandopop’s most recognisable crooners — have struck a chord with many kvinnor who empathised with her detailed accounts of alleged mistreatment.

The spat exploded last Friday, days after Wang announced his divorce to 68 million followers on the Chinese social media platform Weibo.

Annons

Lee then posted a 5,000-word letter alleging Wang’s emotional abuse and serial infidelity during the course of their eight-year marriage, demolishing his previously squeaky-clean image.

She also accused Wang of seeing sex workers and repeatedly cheating on her while she raised their three children at the expense of her career.

A former JP Morgan analyst, Lee studied at Princeton and Columbia University in New York Taiwanese media reported, before marrying Wang aged 27.

“One of the reasons I decided to speak out was because I don’t want any more kvinnor to experience the same things I did,” Lee wrote in a Weibo post that gained over 12 million likes.

Wang denied allegations of cheating and accused Lee of coercing him into marriage in a separate Weibo statement as his father also waded into the spat, sparking threats of legal action.

– Misogyny debate –

The saga took yet another turn early Monday morning when Lee accused Wang of gaslighting her, with the search term “gaslighting” trending in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Wang finally apologised in a Monday Weibo post in which he said he took “all responsibility” and announced a temporary break from the music industry.

Annons

Chinese-speaking users have largely thrown their support behind Lee — giving her the nickname “Thor”, a phonetic pun on her name that invokes the beloved Marvel superhero and fearsome Norse god of thunder.

Multiple brands also dropped Wang, who is believed to have left China.

And the allegations triggered debate on misogyny and abusive marriages in China, where social media discussion of women’s rights is increasingly tightly controlled.

“If more women dare to expose their wounds through speaking out instead of tolerating them, there would be less misogyny in society,” a feminist blogger wrote in a viral WeChat essay titled: “Thank you Lee Jinglei for making society a bit less misogynistic”.

Chinese feminists also hailed Lee’s bravery on social media.

“Women’s speech and their right to public opinion are of vital importance. (Lee Jinglei) finally took a courageous first step,” said a feminist campaigner in Beijing who wished to remain anonymous.

The currently unfettered online discussion contrasts sharply with the blanket censorship of allegations by tennis star Peng.

Hers is the highest-profile allegation from China’s fledgling #MeToo movement, which has been heavily suppressed by domestic authorities but received significant international attention.

Annons

After weeks of no word, Peng resurfaced in a series of highly stage-managed public appearances, denying ever making a sexual assault claim.

But the Women’s Tennis Association said it still had “significant concerns” about her “well-being and ability to communicate without censorship or coercion”.

– Celebs behaving badly –

Wang’s divorce comes as Chinese authorities carry out a wide-ranging morality crackdown on the entertainment industry. And the public spat has not escaped the notice of the Communist Party’s disciplinary watchdog.

“The example of ‘celebrity trainwrecks’ repeatedly demonstrates that people pay attention to public figures’ every word and deed, and each create an impact on society,” the Central Committee for Discipline Inspection said Sunday.

Over the summer several Chinese celebrities have been publicly disgraced and blacklisted from the industry over “immoral” conduct.

Chinese-Canadian singer Kris Wu was charged with rape by Beijing police in August, while actress Zheng Shuang was hit with a $46 million fine for tax evasion the same month.

More recently, Chinese pianist Li Yundi was detained by Beijing police for allegedly soliciting a sex worker.

Annons

Chinese President Xi Jinping emphasised at an arts symposium earlier this month that performers should strive for “moral integrity”, while several government arts and internet regulatory bodies have issued orders to “resist illegal and unethical artists”.

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Brittisk tonåring dog efter "negativa effekter av onlineinnehåll": rättsläkare

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Molly Russell was exposed to online material 'that may have influenced her in a negative way'

Molly Russell was exposed to online material ‘that may have influenced her in a negative way’ – Copyright POOL/AFP/File Philip FONG

A 14-year-old British girl died from an act of self harm while suffering from the “negative effects of online content”, a coroner said Friday in a case that shone a spotlight on social media companies.

Molly Russell was “exposed to material that may have influenced her in a negative way and, in addition, what had started as a depression had become a more serious depressive illness,” Andrew Walker ruled at North London Coroner’s Court.

The teenager “died from an act of self-harm while suffering depression”, he said, but added it would not be “safe” to conclude it was suicide.

Some of the content she viewed was “particularly graphic” and “normalised her condition,” said Walker.

Russell, from Harrow in northwest London, died in November 2017, leading her family to set up a campaign highlighting the dangers of social media.

“There are too many others similarly affected right now,” her father Ian Russell said after the ruling.

Annons

“At this point, I just want to say however dark it seems, there is always hope.

“I hope that this will be an important step in bringing about much needed change,” he added.

The week-long hearing became heated when the family’s lawyer, Oliver Sanders, took an Instagram executive to task.

A visibly angry Sanders asked Elizabeth Lagone, the head of hälsa and wellbeing at Meta, Instagram’s parent company, why the platform allowed children to use it when it was “allowing people to put potentially harmful content on it”.

“You are not a parent, you are just a business in America. You have no right to do that. The children who are opening these accounts don’t have the capacity to consent to this,” he said.

Lagone apologised after being shown footage, viewed by Russell, that “violated our policies”.

Of the 16,300 posts Russell saved, shared or liked on Instagram in the six-month period before her death, 2,100 related to depression, self-harm or suicide, the inquest heard.

Children’s charity NSPCC said the ruling “must be a turning point”.

Annons

“Tech companies must be held accountable when they don’t make children’s safety a priority,” tweeted the charity.

“This must be a turning point,” it added, stressing that any delay to a government bill dealing with online safety “would be inconceivable to parents”.

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