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A 4-Step Guide to Using Hashtags Effectively on LinkedIn

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It may be hard to believe, but with 2019 coming to a close, hashtags have been fully integrated into LinkedIn for well over a year. But despite the staying power of hashtags on the platform, many businesses still struggle with how to best use them to grow their audiences and generate engagement.

In this post, I want to remove that confusion by answering several common questions about using hashtags on LinkedIn. So, if you’ve been wondering what’s up with LinkedIn hashtags, this overview is for you.

What’s the value of using LinkedIn hashtags?

Much like on Twitter and Instagram, hashtags on LinkedIn are a way to categorize your posts, and differentiate them from the rest of the content being uploaded to the platform each day.

By adding hashtags, you make it easier for users searching for content about specific topics (or who are following the hashtag) to find your posts.

LinkedIn hashtags

When should I use hashtags on LinkedIn?

Adding hashtags on LinkedIn is all about finding your sweet spot. Using a long list of hashtags in each post is best saved for Instagram. In general, Twitter best practices suggest a maximum of three to four hashtags per post, which is closer to what you want to aim for when posting to LinkedIn.

Also, hashtags should be specific to your post, not just your brand. More likely than not, people aren’t going to be searching for a branded hashtag on LinkedIn – instead, they’ll be searching for hashtags related to their industry or interests. For example, marketing guru Mark Schaefer weaves hashtags into his LinkedIn posts sparingly but with great impact. When sharing his speaker reel on the platform, he included just two hashtags at the end: #marketing and #keynotespeaker.

By including #marketing, he’s tapping into the broad industry that he appeals to, and establishing that he’s a marketing speaker. By adding #keynotespeaker, he’s not only identifying one of his key strengths and business services, but he’s also helping people to find his posts if they’re searching for keynote speakers.

How do I select the best hashtags for my posts?

Choosing the right hashtags for your LinkedIn updates will change on a post-to-post basis.

Overall, you should aim to use hashtags which are specific to your industry and niche consistently across different posts. You can then apply additional hashtags that are specific to what you’re posting about. For example, if you’re sharing a job post, include hashtags like #jobpost or #opportunity. You can also include event-specific hashtags to draw people who might be searching for fellow attendees.

Also, consider looking at the hashtags LinkedIn recommends at the bottom of your posts while you’re crafting them. These are populated automatically through LinkedIn’s algorithm, which means that they’ll likely be a good match for your posts.

But remember, don’t spam your posts with too many hashtags.

Should I participate in trending hashtag topics?

You may have noticed on your LinkedIn company profiles that you’re now getting notifications to join in on conversations around trending hashtags – but should you be taking the time to participate?

LinkedIn’s algorithm has two primary objectives:

  1. To assess content relevancy
  2. To assess engagement

This means that posts which are relevant are more important than those that are recent, while the algorithm also puts extra weighting on engagement.

With this in mind, participating in these trending conversations can help boost your ranking in the LinkedIn algorithm and make a name for yourself relative to that topic.

Time for a Test Drive

I encourage you to include a few new hashtags in your next LinkedIn post to see how your engagement increases. It’s worth experimenting with different approaches, and monitoring your analytics – and with LinkedIn engagement overall on the rise, it could be a great way to tap into a rising content stream. 

Socialmediatoday.com

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The Most Visited Websites in the World – 2023 Edition [Infographic]

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The Most Visited Websites in the World - 2023 Edition [Infographic]

Google remains the most-visited website in the world, while Facebook is still the most frequented social platform, based on web traffic. Well, actually, YouTube is, but YouTube’s only a partial social app, right?

The findings are displayed in this new visualization from Visual Capitalist, which uses SimilarWeb data to show the most visited websites in bubble chart format, highlighting the variance in traffic.

As you can see, following Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are the next most visited social platforms, which is likely in line with what most would expect – though the low numbers for TikTok probably stand out, given its dominance of modern media zeitgeist.

But there is a reason for that – this data is based on website visits, not app usage, so platforms like TikTok and Snapchat, which are primarily focused on the in-app experience, won’t fare as well in this particular overview.

In that sense, it’s interesting to see which social platforms are engaging audiences via their desktop offerings.

You can check out the full overview below, and you can read Visual Capitalist’s full explainer here.

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Cheeky branding wins (and missteps)

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Cheeky branding wins (and missteps)

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Branding and rebranding is getting more fun, here we look at some of cheekiest brands that have caught our eye – for the right and wrong reasons.



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Google Outlines Ongoing Efforts to Combat China-Based Influence Operations Targeting Social Apps

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Google Outlines Ongoing Efforts to Combat China-Based Influence Operations Targeting Social Apps

Over the past year, Google has repeatedly noted that a China-based group has been looking to use YouTube, in particular, to influence western audiences, by building various channels in the app, then seeding them with pro-China content.

There’s limited info available on the full origins or intentions of the group, but today, Google has published a new overview of its ongoing efforts to combat the initiative, called DRAGONBRIDGE.

As explained by Google:

In 2022, Google disrupted over 50,000 instances of DRAGONBRIDGE activity across YouTube, Blogger, and AdSense, reflecting our continued focus on this actor and success in scaling our detection efforts across Google products. We have terminated over 100,000 DRAGONBRIDGE accounts in the IO network’s lifetime.

As you can see in this chart, DRAGONBRIDGE is by far the most prolific source of coordinated information operations that Google has detected over the past year, while Google also notes that it’s been able to disrupt most of the project’s attempted influence, by snuffing out its content before it gets seen.

Dragonbridge

Worth noting the scale too – as Google notes, DRAGONBRIDGE has created more than 100,000 accounts, which includes tens of thousands of YouTube channels. Not individual videos, entire channels in the app, which is a huge amount of work, and content, that this group is producing.

That can’t be cheap, or easy to keep running. So they must be doing it for a reason.

The broader implication, which has been noted by various other publications and analysts, is that DRAGONBRIDGE is potentially being supported by the Chinese Government, as part of a broader effort to influence foreign policy approaches via social media apps. 

Which, at this kind of scale, is a concern, while DRAGONBRIDGE has also targeted Facebook and Twitter as well, at different times, and it could be that their efforts on those platforms are also reaching similar activity levels, and may not have been detected as yet.

Which then also relates to TikTok, a Chinese-owned app that now has massive influence over younger audiences in western nations. If programs like this are already in effect, it stands to reason that TikTok is also likely a key candidate for boosting the same, which remains a key concern among regulators and officials in many nations.

The US Government is reportedly weighing a full TikTok ban, and if that happens, you can bet that many other nations will follow suit. Many government organizations are also banning TikTok on official devices, based on advice from security experts, and with programs like DRAGONBRIDGE also running, it does seem like Chinese-based groups are actively operating influence and manipulation programs in foreign nations.

Which seems like a significant issue, and while Google is seemingly catching most of these channels before they have an impact, it also seems likely that this is only one element of a larger push.

Hopefully, through collective action, the impact of such can be limited – but for TikTok, which still reports to Chinese ownership, it’s another element that could raise further questions and scrutiny.

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