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Facebook Announces New Deals to Enable Gaming Streamers to Include Popular Music in Their Broadcasts

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This could be a big update in Facebook’s ongoing push to recruit more gaming streamers. Today, The Social Network has announced that its established new arrangements with various music publishers which will enable Facebook Gaming streamers to play popular music within their streams.

Facebook Gaming music announcement

As explained by Facebook:

Last year, we announced the rollout of music on Facebook Gaming. Since then, we’ve been testing with our Partner Creators to ensure they’re able to use a vast array of popular music in their streams without risk of takedowns. We’ve learned a lot and made some improvements. And today, we’re excited to expand access to music to even more creators.

Under the new arrangements, all Partner and Level Up Creators will now be able to play background music during their gaming livestreams on Facebook Gaming, with Facebook essentially licensing the music on their behalf.

“And we’re not talking elevator music. We’ve got deals in place with hundreds of music labels and publishers, including Universal Music Group, Warner Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, Kobalt Music Group, BMG, Merlin and many more, so creators can include popular music in their Facebook Gaming livestreams to get their audiences hyped.”

That’s significant, because both YouTube and Twitch, the biggest platforms in game streaming, do not allow for free music usage in the same way.

YouTube and Twitch do provide copyright-free tracks for use in videos and streams, but Facebook’s new deal provides the capacity to include almost any track you want, without fear of your stream being shut down due to copyright violations.

That doesn’t, however, stretch to all streams across Facebook’s apps. Instagram, for example, still has restrictions on music use in IG Live, which could see your broadcast interrupted as a result, with this new update only relating to gaming streams specifically, and the use of music in the background of your live videos.

It also doesn’t cover broadcasts where music is the focus, like a radio show via a Gaming stream. That’s still not allowed, and will get shut down if Facebook detects it.

Facebook also notes that there are some tracks that will remain unavailable:

“But they are rare, and we’re always working to expand the amount of music that’s available to use. If you run into a restricted track, we’ll surface an in-product notification that identifies the artist and title. That way you can adjust your playlist to avoid future interruptions.”

To celebrate the announcement, Facebook’s also hosting a series of celebrity DJ streams, paired with select gaming creators.

Facebook Gaming DJ series

It’s an interesting update, which could provide a level of differentiation for Facebook’s Gaming platform, which has seen increased interest of late.

Last October, StreamLabs reported that Facebook Gaming surpassed 1 billion hours watched for the first time, which still leaves it a long way behind the leaders in the space, but is a significant jump in performance.

Facebook Gaming growth

If Facebook can lure more gaming streamers across, that could help it grow its gaming audience, and as the company also looks to dominate the evolving VR space, that could better position Facebook to take a bigger share of the gaming market, providing another revenue stream.

How significant an impact being able to play music more freely in your streams will actually make is hard to say, but maybe, if streamers feel more free to broadcast how they like, that could be a valuable addition, and could provide more impetus to bring more streamers across to Facebook’s Gaming platform instead.

You can read more about the Facebook Gaming music update here.

Socialmediatoday.com

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Meta Could be Exploring Paid Blue Checkmarks on Facebook and Instagram

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Meta Could be Exploring Paid Blue Checkmarks on Facebook and Instagram

It seems like Elon Musk’s chaotic management approach at Twitter is having some broader impacts, with more companies reportedly considering lay-offs in the wake of Musk culling 70% of Twitter staff (and keeping the app running), and Meta now apparently also considering charging for blue checkmarks in its apps.

Yes, the Twitter Blue approach to making people pay for verification, which hasn’t proven overly popular on Twitter itself, is now also seemingly in consideration at Meta as well.

According to a new finding by reverse engineering pro Alessandro Paluzzi, there’s a new mention in the codebase of both Facebook and Instagram of a ‘paid blue badge’.

Paluzzi also shared a screenshot of the code with TechCrunch:

That does appear to refer to a subscription service for both apps, which could well give you a blue verification badge as a result.

Mets has neither confirmed nor denied the project, but it does seem, at least on the surface, that it’s considering offering checkmarks as another paid option – which still seems strange, considering the original purpose of verification, which is to signify noteworthy people or profiles in the app.

If people can just buy that, then it’s no longer of any value, right?

Evidently, that’s not the case, and with Twitter already bringing in around $7 million per quarter from Twitter Blue subscriptions, maybe Meta’s looking for a means to supplement its own intake, and make up for lost ad dollars and/or rising costs of its metaverse development.

It seems counter-intuitive, but I guess, if people will pay, and the platforms aren’t concerned about there being confusion as to what the blue ticks actually mean.

I guess, more money is good?

Meta has, in the past, said that it won’t charge a subscription fee to access its apps. But this, of course, would be supplemental – users wouldn’t have to pay, but they could buy a blue checkmark if they wanted, and use the implied value of recognition for their own purposes.

Which seems wrong, but tough times, higher costs – maybe every app needs to start digging deeper.

Meta hasn’t provided any info or confirmation at this stage, but we’ll keep you updated on any progress.



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YouTube Shorts Exceed 50B Daily Views, Meta’s Reels Doubles Plays 02/03/2023

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YouTube Shorts Exceed 50B Daily Views, Meta's Reels Doubles Plays 02/03/2023

YouTube Shorts and Meta’s Reels are both making
headway in the intensely competitive video shorts sector.  

During Alphabet’s Q4 earnings call on Thursday, CEO Sundar Pichai reported that YouTube Shorts has surpassed 50 billion
daily views. That’s up from the 30 billion reported in Q1 2022.

However, it still …



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Podcast Marketing Statistics for Businesses [Infographic]

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Podcast Marketing Statistics for Businesses [Infographic]

Podcasts have become an increasingly popular content format, providing on-demand, topical material covering virtually any subject that you can think of.

Indeed, according to estimates, over 130 million people will listen to podcasts monthly in the US this year, which could also provide significant opportunities for marketers to tap into this captive audience, and reach them with relevant ads and offers.

If you’re considering getting into podcasting or podcast advertising, this will help. The team from Spiralytics have put together a collection of podcast consumption stats and notes, which could help guide your thinking around the format.

Check out the full infographic below.

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