Connect with us

SOCIAL

TikTok Becomes the First Non-Facebook Owned App to Reach 3 Billion Installs

Published

on

Despite the launches of various competing apps and functions, and a rising push to steal away its top stars, TikTok continues to grow, with new stats from Sensor Tower underlining the app’s enduring popularity, and resilience, as it takes on the bigger players.

According to Sensor Tower, TikTok, when you also include the Chinese version of the app called ‘Douyin’, has now surpassed 3 billion total installs globally – becoming the first non-Facebook app to reach that mark – while it also continues to see strong growth momentum in 2021.

TikTok downloads by quarter

As per Sensor Tower:

TikTok was the most downloaded and highest-grossing non-game app globally in the first half of 2021, reaching nearly 383 million first-time installs and an estimated $919.2 million in consumer spending. Although new downloads of the app were down 38 percent year-over-year from nearly 619 million in 1H 2020 – a decline partially attributable to its removal from India’s app stores – consumer spending in TikTok was up 73 percent from $530.2 million in the year-ago period.”

Which is a key point for TikTok’s future growth, because while user growth is essential, being able to convert that captive audience into actual revenue is the real indicator of business success.

More spending will also help TikTok maintain its growth, because as noted, both Facebook and YouTube, recognizing the significant threat that TikTok now poses, have been working to improve their creator monetization tools, in an effort to lure popular stars across to their platforms, offering both bigger reach and income potential for their efforts.

TikTok needs to be able to provide comparative value for creators in order to keep up, and while size remains in favor of the bigger players (for now), its the real money side of the equation that could still sink TikTok, if it can’t find ways to match up, and its most popular stars do end up migrating to greener pastures, taking their audiences with them.

That’s what happened to Vine, which had no effective monetization process, which is why TikTok is doing all that it can to improve its eCommmerce tools, and facilitate more brand/creator partnerships.

But it remains an uphill battle. Snapchat went direct for this element with its TikTok-like Spotlight offering, shelling out $1 million a day to the best Spotlight clips (which it’s since reduced to millions per month‘ instead). Just today, Facebook announced a new $1 billion dollar creator fund to add more incentive within its apps.

Advertisement

TikTok can’t spend at the same rate Facebook can, but the true key lies in building a sustainable creator ecosystem, which it’s hoping to establish with these elements.

Again, the spend data from Sensor Tower is a good sign on this front, showing that users are willing to make transactions in-app.

“In Q2 2021, TikTok saw its greatest quarter-over-quarter growth in consumer spending since Q2 2020, climbing 39 percent to $534.6 million from $384.7 million in the previous quarter. TikTok’s adoption has also accelerated in 2021, as first-time downloads climbed 2 percent Q/Q to 177.5 million in Q1 2021, and surged 16 percent Q/Q to 205.4 million Q2 2021, the most growth the app has seen since its record-breaking Q1 2020 when it accumulated more than 315 million installs, the most any app has seen in a single quarter.”

TikTok spending growth

It’s amazing to consider the growth of the app – particularly when you take into account that it also lost its second-biggest user market in the middle of last year (in India), which should really have caused more of a bump in its stats. 

But TikTok keeps on going, and keeps on building momentum. Which has Facebook and YouTube spooked (and likely whispering in the ears of people in Washington about the threat posed by Chinese-owned apps), and given the charts above, it’s easy to see why. TikTok, particularly with its hold on younger audiences, now has the potential to become the key app, much like Facebook rolled over MySpace in the early 00s.  

It may not be at that level just yet, but Facebook knows all too well that getting a foothold with the youngsters is the way to market dominance.

Facebook is no longer in that seat, and Instagram isn’t either. 

And just like Facebook, you can’t overlook the potential of what that may mean in the broader scheme. 

Socialmediatoday.com

Advertisement
Advertisement

SOCIAL

Ahead of World Cup, influencer ‘Mr Q’ lifts veil on Qatar

Published

on

Khalifa Al Haroon, known to his followers as Mr Q, has become a social media hit by partially lifting the veil on World Cup host Qatar

Khalifa Al Haroon, known to his followers as Mr Q, has become a social media hit by partially lifting the veil on World Cup host Qatar – Copyright AFP KARIM JAAFAR

Raphaelle Peltier

At a time when prickly questions are being asked about Qatar and its hosting of the World Cup, Khalifa Al Haroon offers a smile, a sigh and a shrug as he seeks to explain its mysteries.

Known to his growing number of followers as Mr Q, the 38-year-old has become a social media hit by partially lifting the veil over the tiny but mega-rich Gulf state that describes itself as a “conservative” Islamic country.

The first World Cup in an Arab nation has put a spotlight on Qatar’s treatment of foreign workers, gender rights and even the use of air conditioning in stadiums.

Haroon’s cheerful #QTip videos broach everything from saying “Hello” in Arabic to the right way for men to wear the flowing ghutra headdress. There is also an edition on labour rights.

With less than 60 days to the November 20 start of the tournament, he now has more than 100,000 followers on Instagram and more than 115,000 on YouTube. And the numbers keep growing.

Advertisement

Qatar has dozens of online influencers on topics ranging from “modest” but expensive fashion, to the latest sports car being imported into what is now one of the world’s wealthiest nations.

Haroon carved out his niche by elucidating Qatar’s unknowns to its growing expat community — and now the hordes of football fans expected for the World Cup.

Haroon — who was born to a Qatari father and British mother and spent 16 years in Bahrain — said he was first confronted by global stereotypes about Qatar and the Middle East while studying for a law degree in Britain.

He had wanted to become an actor, but instead launched his social media presence in 2008 with a blog.

“I was in the perfect position because I was a Qatari who has never lived properly in Qatar,” he said.

– ‘Trust your own eyes’ –

“In essence, I was like a foreigner in my own country and so I had the same questions that foreigners did, and so it just made it easy for me to start putting together information.”

Haroon said there has to be a distinction between “negative news” and misinformation about his country.

Advertisement

“When it comes to fake news, obviously, I think everybody understands that it’s not true and so the only thing that I could do is show people videos and pictures and show them what we’re really like because you can trust your own eyes.”

Some people, he said, have told him they decided to move to Qatar after watching his videos.

Haroon, who is now a consultant to the Qatar Football Association and an eSports entrepreneur, said he is excited about the World Cup “because people can now come here and experience it for themselves and make their own judgements instead of just believing what’s written”.

His main grouse is how outsiders see something negative about Qatar and then believe that all Qataris “accept it or we all agree with it”.

Many supporters of the 31 foreign countries who will play in Qatar have raised concerns, however, about the welcome awaiting them. Can they drink? And what will happen to same-sex couples in a country where homosexuality is illegal?

The government has insisted that beer, normally restricted, will be available and that everyone is welcome. Haroon wants outsiders to experience “real Qatari hospitality”, with its food and coffee culture.

“Of course there are going to be certain social norms,” said Haroon. “What we are asking for is just respect the country. And of course the country will definitely be respecting everyone that comes.”

“Some people might make mistakes because they don’t know what the rules are and that’s OK,” he added.

Advertisement

“The point is our culture is all about intention, our religion is about intention, so as long as you have good intentions and you want to do the right thing, you have nothing to worry about.”

Source link

Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending

en_USEnglish