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YouTube Tests Automated Video Chapters to Improve Navigation

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After rolling out video chapters to all creators back in May, which enables creators to define specific segments of their video via time stamps, YouTube is now running an experiment which will see chapters automatically inserted into selected videos, using machine learning to identify segments within each clip.

As explained by YouTube:

“We want to make it easier for people to navigate videos with video chapters, so we are experimenting with automatically adding video chapters (so creators don’t have to manually add timestamps). We’ll use machine learning to recognize text in order to auto generate video chapters. We’re testing this out with a small group of videos.” 

That could eventually see chapters added to all YouTube clips, without creators having to manually add them, giving YouTube more ways to define specific segments related to more search queries. 

As noted, YouTube added video chapters back in May, which creates specific segments on the playback bar to signify each part of the clip.

That makes it easier for viewers to skip through to the sections they’re most interested in, but it also enables YouTube, and by extension Google, to identify very specific video elements in response to user queries.

So if you go looking for ‘videos about clipping your dog’s nails’, Google could now provide you with not only a listing of video clips, but links to the specific segments within each video that relates directly to your query.

Given this, the addition of automated segmentation could significantly improve YouTube’s search capacity, splicing each video into its key elements – but then again, it could also end up framing segments into weird spaces, and ruining the flow of your content.

YouTube says that creators can opt-out of the experiment, though it will only be trialed on a small scale at this stage.

But it could mean that you see a lot more segmentation and chapters in YouTube clips soon, which has direct implications for search. 

Socialmediatoday.com

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Weird of the Week

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Weird of the Week

What happened when six doctors swallowed Lego heads for science, and the results of Santa’s DNA test. Plus, is Dolly Parton really recording an album with Slipknot?

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The Most Visited Websites in the World – 2023 Edition [Infographic]

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The Most Visited Websites in the World - 2023 Edition [Infographic]

Google remains the most-visited website in the world, while Facebook is still the most frequented social platform, based on web traffic. Well, actually, YouTube is, but YouTube’s only a partial social app, right?

The findings are displayed in this new visualization from Visual Capitalist, which uses SimilarWeb data to show the most visited websites in bubble chart format, highlighting the variance in traffic.

As you can see, following Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are the next most visited social platforms, which is likely in line with what most would expect – though the low numbers for TikTok probably stand out, given its dominance of modern media zeitgeist.

But there is a reason for that – this data is based on website visits, not app usage, so platforms like TikTok and Snapchat, which are primarily focused on the in-app experience, won’t fare as well in this particular overview.

In that sense, it’s interesting to see which social platforms are engaging audiences via their desktop offerings.

You can check out the full overview below, and you can read Visual Capitalist’s full explainer here.

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Cheeky branding wins (and missteps)

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Cheeky branding wins (and missteps)

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Branding and rebranding is getting more fun, here we look at some of cheekiest brands that have caught our eye – for the right and wrong reasons.



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