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53% of Brands Won’t Pay for Verification on Twitter, Survey Suggests

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53% of Brands Won’t Pay for Verification on Twitter, Survey Suggests

With Twitter re-launching its controversial $8 verification program today (which now costs $11 for some users), what impact will that have on the platform, and how are brands feeling about the changes to its verification program, which will now see them get a gold tick instead of a blue one?

The team from Capterra sought to find out, surveying 300 US marketing and advertising professionals to get their thoughts on Elon’s paid verification program, how they’re approaching Twitter ads, the changes to verification status, and more.

You can check out Capterra’s full survey report here, but in this post, we’ll look at some of the key notes.

First off, according to Capterra’s data, 53% of brands say that they’re unlikely to pay $7.99 a month for verification on Twitter.

Now, a lot of that will depend on exactly how Twitter goes about this, and what sort of broader momentum the program sees. At present, brands that already have a blue checkmark will now get a gold one instead, to mitigate the risks of impersonation, and at some stage, they’ll likely have to pay $8 per month to keep that gold tick.

But we don’t know when the deadline for this will be, and if the new verification program sees massive take-up, which then prompts other brands to buy-in, there could be increased momentum for all brands to pay-up, in order to keep the indicator of authority, and trust, in the app.

But right now, just over half of brands don’t see the value in paying for a checkmark.

Indeed, respondents indicated that they’d be more willing to pay for better promotion opportunities, better user targeting, and improved security in the app over verification.

That said, just over half of brands also indicated that they believe verification does serve an important purpose.

When you combine the two data points, you can see a world where more brands do indeed start paying $8 per month to keep their checkmark in the app.

Again, it all depends on broader take-up – if a lot of users sign-on to the program, and it becomes an accepted thing, the overall momentum could also see more brands getting on-board. But it depends on general adoption, and also the amount of time that Twitter gives brands before it takes their checkmark away, if they don’t sign-up.

In terms of overall risk on the platform, given Musk’s stated passion for allowing more ‘free speech’ in the app, nearly 2 out of 3 current Twitter advertisers say that advertising on the platform is risky for their brand right now.

Among the main concerns are increased incidences of hate speech, as well as misinformation, and impersonation – with the latter being a key problem with the initial launch of Twitter’s updated verification plan.

Capterra Twitter survey

Again, Twitter’s updated verification program seems to have addressed a lot of the impersonation concerns, at least from a brand perspective. But clearly, there are still some concerns among the business community.

Hate speech and misinformation have also, reportedly, increased since Elon took over at the app – though Twitter itself says that hate speech, overall, is on the decline.

Still, as Elon brings back thousands of previously banned users, and touts COVID theories from his own account, you can understand why some brands are hesitant about the app at this stage.

Still, these concerns, at least right now, don’t appear to be having a big impact on overall ad spend habits.

Capterra Twitter survey

Less than a quarter of participants indicated that they’re looking to reduce Twitter ad spend, while 31% of brands have opted to monitor the situation, rather than suspending current ad campaigns.

As with most Twitter elements, it’s a bit of a ‘wait and see’, with the impacts of Musk’s changes set to happen over time, making it harder to judge the right approach just yet.

And with Elon also proclaiming record high usage, you can see why some advertisers are facing a dilemma, which can only be answered by seeing what comes next at the app.

But they are also preparing for the worst:

Capterra Twitter survey

As you can see in this chart, approximately 3 in 4 respondents believe marketers will move to other top social media platforms such as Instagram (76%), Facebook (75%), and TikTok (60%) if Twitter shuts down.

Which still seems unlikely. I mean, Elon is clearly taking some risks, which is pretty much how he operates – Musk seems willing to take on far bigger risk than most other business owners would dare, which, thus far, has helped him achieve much bigger success as a result.

But it could also fall flat.

The total collapse of Twitter would take a massive shift, and I don’t think it’ll get that far. But if it does come to that, Instagram looks like the biggest beneficiary, based on these stats, followed by Facebook and TikTok.

These are some interesting notes on how businesses view the current state of Twitter, and Elon’s reformation of the app. And while, again, it’s mostly a ‘wait and see’ proposition, the pulse of brands right now is that there is a level of hesitancy, which really could go either way.

It all depends on what comes next.  

NOTE: Elon Musk has re-stated, once again that ‘legacy’ blue checkmarks will be phased out ‘in a few months’.

No firm date, but brands will indeed be asked to pay to keep their checkmark sometime soon.

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Twitter Publishes 2023 Marketing Calendar to Assist with Campaign Planning

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Twitter Publishes 2023 Marketing Calendar to Assist with Campaign Planning

Looking to map out your content calendar for the year ahead?

This will help – Twitter has published its annual events calendar, which highlights all of the key dates and celebrations that you need to keep in mind in your planning.

The interactive calendar provides a solid overview of important dates, which could assist in your strategy. You can also filter the list by region, and by event type.

Twitter marketing calendar 2023

You can also download any specific listing, though the download itself is pretty basic – you don’t get, like, a pretty calendar template that you can stick on your wall or anything.

Twitter marketing calendar 2023

Twitter used to publish downloadable calendars, but switched to an online-only display a couple of years back. Which still includes all the same info, but isn’t as cool looking.

Either way, it may help in your process, as you map out your 2023 approach.

In addition to this, Twitter’s also published an overview of some of the major events that it’ll be looking to highlight in the app throughout the year, along with a pitch to advertisers, amid the more recent chaos at the app.

As per Twitter:

We’re moving more quickly than ever, and we’re still the place people turn to see and talk about what’s happening. A great example is the recent FIFA Men’s World Cup. We saw a whopping 147B impressions of event-related content on the platform, up nearly +30% from 2018. We also generated 7.1B views on World Cup video1, with everything from memes to nail-biter outcomes to history being made.”

There’s also this:

Not only is Twitter alive with content and conversation around big moments, but we are also growing. We saw global mDAU acceleration in Q4 to 253.1M, driven by an average sign-up rate of more than 1 million new daily users across Q42.”

That’s the first official usage stat Twitter has shared since Elon Musk took over at the app, and is a significant jump on the 238 million mDAU that Twitter reported in Q2 last year, its last market update before the sale went through.

It’ll be interesting to see if that usage level holds, as Twitter works through its latest changes and updates.

You can check out Twitter’s 2023 marketing calendar here.



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‘Stop the hate’ online, UN chief pleads on Holocaust Day

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A person visits the Holocaust Memorial, in Berlin, Germany on January 27, 2023, on International Holocaust Remembrance Day

A person visits the Holocaust Memorial, in Berlin, Germany on January 27, 2023, on International Holocaust Remembrance Day – Copyright AFP Michal Cizek

The UN secretary-general warned of social media’s role in spreading violent extremism around the globe as he marked Holocaust Remembrance Day on Friday, urging policy makers to help stop online hate.

Antonio Guterres said parts of the internet were turning into “toxic waste dumps for hate and vicious lies” that were driving “extremism from the margins to the mainstream.”

“Today, I am issuing an urgent appeal to everyone with influence across the information ecosystem,” Guterres said at a commemoration ceremony at the United Nations. “Stop the hate. Set up guardrails. And enforce them.”

He accused social media platforms and advertisers of profiting off the spread of hateful content.

“By using algorithms that amplify hate to keep users glued to their screens, social media platforms are complicit,” added Guterres. “And so are the advertisers subsidizing this business model.”

Guterres drew parallels with the rise of Nazism in 1930s Germany, when people didn’t pay attention or protest.

“Today, we can hear echoes of those same siren songs to hate. From an economic crisis that is breeding discontent to populist demagogues using the crisis to seduce voters to runaway misinformation, paranoid conspiracy theories and unchecked hate speech.”

He lamented the rise of anti-Semitism, which he said also reflects a rise of all kinds of hate.

“And what is true for anti-Semitism is true for other forms of hate. Racism. Anti-Muslim bigotry. Xenophobia. Homophobia. Misogyny”

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Weird of the Week

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Weird of the Week

What happened when six doctors swallowed Lego heads for science, and the results of Santa’s DNA test. Plus, is Dolly Parton really recording an album with Slipknot?

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