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The Most Followed Celebrities on Instagram in Comparison to National Populations [Infographic]

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The most followed celebrities on Instagram command massive attention, which sees them generate huge engagement every time they post. But have you ever considered just how significant their audiences are, in comparison to, say, the population of some nations?

The team at PostBeyond did, which is why they put together this new infographic, which compares the most followed celebrities on Instagram with national populations from around the world, to provide some extra context on just how significant their reach and influence in the app has now become.

For example:

  • Cristiano Ronaldo’s Instagram following is now bigger than 4x the population of the UK
  • Ariana Grande commands an audience in the app that’s comparable to 5c the population of Spain
  • Kylie Jenner’s audience is equivalent to 6x the population of Canada

Of course, not all of their followers are active in the app all the time, and they’re not all seeing every post from each of these celebrities. And as we’ve seen from past fake account culls, a percentage of them would also be bots and fakes, which may have been purchased by the celebrity of their team, or may simply be following these big accounts to make themselves seem more legit.

Yet even so, it’s interesting to see the sizes of their Instagram audiences matched up against these population stats. I mean, it’s like saying ‘if Facebook were a country, it would be twice the size of China’, which is true, in a numbers sense, but more of a trivia point than a statement of status or influence.

But then again…

You can check out the full infographic below.

Instagram celebrities vs world populations infographic

Socialmediatoday.com

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Valentino and Dior bet on K-pop amid China tensions. Will it pay off?

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Valentino and Dior bet on K-pop amid China tensions. Will it pay off?

Since January, Suga has been part of Valentino’s ambassadors called Di.Vas, short for Different Values, and will appear in a campaign in collaboration with GQ across print, online and social media. “He has the capacity to express all the values of the brand and of a generation he speaks for in his spontaneous and contemporary way. Each Valentino Di.Vas plays a key role in sustaining the new vision of the company,” according to Valentino.

In China, it’s a different story. When South Korea deployed a US Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (Thaad) anti-missile system in August 2016, Beijing’s policymakers were angered. Chinese officials viewed the Thaad deployment as another American effort to contain China, while South Korea argued that the shield was for protection against North Korea’s nuclear threat. In retaliation, China took aim at South Korea by banning its prized cultural exports, such as TV shows and music. 

Throughout 2021, the Chinese government strengthened regulation of the entertainment industry to “reduce frenzied idol worshipping” of celebrities. In September that year, 22 fan accounts, including those of BTS, were suspended by Chinese social media network Weibo for what it called “irrational star-chasing behaviour”. China’s National Radio and Television Administration (NRTA) also instructed broadcasters to ban television appearances of 娘泡 (niang pao) — a derogatory term for androgynous or effeminate men. The move was widely viewed as a measure to antagonise K-pop, since Korean male stars are often known for their pretty looks. 

In November 2022, Chinese tech giant Tencent unexpectedly resumed the online streaming of South Korean movie Hotel by the River, prompting speculation around whether China may lift its ban on Korean entertainment. Today, there isn’t a flat ban on hallyu — or the Korean wave, used in relation to Korean culture — in China, but local media may omit K-pop activities out of respect for their country, says Elisa Harca, co-founder and Asia CEO of Red Ant Asia, a marketing agency that works with global brands including Balmain and Byredo to navigate China. 

Luxury may be turning to Korean stars as “an act of risk control”, says Jasmine Zhu, managing partner of Epico Partners, a Hong Kong-based growth consultancy. Korean nationals are now the world’s biggest spenders per capita on personal luxury goods, with an average spend per year of $325, according to a report published by Morgan Stanley this month. It’s far more than the $55 and $280 per capita currently spent by Chinese and American nationals, according to the investment firm’s estimates. “[Brands are] deprioritising China as a result of the country’s Covid policies, lockdowns and economical instabilities in recent years,” says Zhu.

Korea’s enduring appeal

Enhypen generated $7.2 million in earned media value (EMV) — nearly a quarter of Prada’s overall EMV of $31.6 million, making them “the most impactful influencers” at Milan men’s fashion week, according to Hugo Ramos, brand analyst at influencer and analytics firm Lefty. The outsized attention that Enhypen has been able to bring is indicative of why luxury brands are partnering with Korean talent. K-pop stars have broad appeal outside of their home country; and as a relatively new genre, they also appeal to a very young audience — an increasingly important demographic for luxury brands. 

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Meta Launches New Rights Manager Mini-Site to Help Brands Detect and Action IP Violations

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Meta Launches New Rights Manager Mini-Site to Help Brands Detect and Action IP Violations

Meta’s looking to provide more help for businesses that are seeking to ensure their intellectual copyright is not being exploited within its apps, with the launch of a new, dedicated Rights Manager mini-site, which includes a complete overview of Meta’s rights management systems, as well as explainers on how to use its tools.

As explained by Meta:

Our new Rights Manager website includes details on all protections under Rights Manager. We provide unprecedented transparency into the tools and policies we use to help copyright holders better control when, how and where their content is shared on our services. The website further explains the many systems, policies and procedures we use to protect lawful content.”

The site includes a heap of links and overviews, covering every aspect of Meta’s evolving rights management systems, and includes testimonials from businesses that have benefited from its tools.

There’s also an overview of all of the updates that Meta’s made to its rights management processes over time:

Meta Rights Manager

Meta’s Brand Rights Manager tool, which is the main functional element of the site, enables brands to upload images of their licensed products, which Meta’s systems can then use as a reference point for detecting similar matches, in order to highlight potential usage violations in Page posts, Marketplace listings, etc. 

Facebook Brand Rights Protection

Last October, Meta added some new enhancements for the tool, including automated takedowns (for brands with a strong reporting history), improved alert recommendations, and the ability for rights holders to upload a list of Facebook Pages and Instagram accounts that are authorized to use their product images, to limit false positives.

It’s an increasingly valuable tool, and as more businesses look to capitalize on online shopping, it makes sense that more will also be looking to use misleading product images, or to re-sell goods at inflated prices.

Meta’s evolving solutions could be of big benefit in this respect, and this new, dedicated site provides more information on exactly how those systems work, and how brands can make best use of these options.

Certainly worth considering for all eCommerce brands.

You can apply for access to Meta’s Rights Manager here, or check out the new mini-site here.

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Tinuiti Acquires Ampush In Move To Further Support Paid Social 01/25/2023

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Tinuiti Acquires Ampush In Move To Further Support Paid Social 01/25/2023

Performance marketing firm Tinuiti announced Tuesday
the acquisition of Ampush, a growth marketing agency with a focus on social platforms.

The acquisition expands Tinuiti’s paid social capabilities.

While the two companies offer
some overlapping services, the deal will support brands with access to social best practices, campaigns, creative, and data …



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