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10 Major SEO Mistakes (And How to Avoid Them)

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Are you making these SEO mistakes?

If you are, you should be aware. These are big mistakes—ones that could affect your chances of ranking higher on the search engines.

Continue reading to find out if they apply to your SEO and learn how to avoid them:

  1. Not doing keyword research
  2. Not matching search intent
  3. Targeting keywords that are too difficult
  4. Not building enough backlinks
  5. Breaking Google’s Terms of Service when building links
  6. Missing internal link opportunities
  7. Not letting Google crawl your content
  8. Not letting Google index your content
  9. Having an extremely slow site
  10. Treating SEO as a one-time thing

1. Not doing keyword research

Many website owners randomly create content and think they’ll get search traffic. But if nobody’s searching for those topics, then they won’t be clicking through to any pages.

Translation: zero search traffic.

That’s likely one of the reasons why 90.63% of pages get no traffic from Google, according to our study.

Pie chart showing 90.63% of pages get no organic search traffic from Google

Meaning, if you want search traffic, your content needs to be about topics people are searching for.

How do you find these topics? Keyword research.

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Keyword research is the process of understanding the language your target customers use when searching for your products, services, and content. It is the only way to figure out what people are typing into search engines so that you can create content around it.

How to avoid this SEO mistake

Before you publish any page (for search traffic), make sure the page targets a keyword with search traffic potential.

Here’s how to find these keywords:

  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer
  2. Enter one or a few relevant keywords related to your website or niche (e.g., if you’re selling coffee, then such keywords can be coffee, cappuccino, latte, etc)
  3. Go to the Matching terms report

List of keywords with corresponding data like KD, volume, etc

Here, there are more than 4 million potential keywords you can target. Look through the list and pick out keywords that are relevant and have traffic potential (look at the TP column).

If you’re looking for informational keywords you can create blog posts around, click the Questions tab:

"Questions" tab in Matching terms report

2. Not matching search intent

Google’s goal is to provide users with the most relevant result for every query.

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That means if you want to rank high on Google, you need to be the most relevant result for the query. In actionable terms, it means your content needs to align with search intent.

Search intent is the why behind a search query. In other words, why did the person do this search?

Here’s an example. If we look for “best frying pans” on Google, we’ll see the results are mostly blog posts about the best frying pans:

SERP overview for "best frying pans"

Google knows that users searching for this query are looking to compare, not buy. So if you’re an e-commerce store that sells frying pans, Google will likely not rank your category page for this query—simply because it’s not what users want.

How to avoid this SEO mistake

Before you create any content, make sure you’re aligning with search intent. And since no one understands search intent better than Google, the best starting point is to analyze the current top-ranking results for the three Cs of search intent:

1. Content type

Content types usually fall into one of five buckets: blog post, product, category, landing page, or video. For example, the top-ranking pages for “nike air jordans” are all category pages:

SERP overview for "nike air jordans"

Searchers are in buying mode. If you want to rank for this keyword, it’s likely you’ll have to follow suit—create a category page.

2. Content format

Content format applies mostly to blog posts, as they’re usually how-tos, listicles, news articles, opinion pieces, or reviews.

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For example, the top-ranking pages for the topic “kettlebell swing” are mostly how-to guides:

SERP overview for "kettlebell swing"

3. Content angle

Content angle refers to the main “selling point” of the content. For example, people searching for “how to make fried rice” seem to want the cooking process to be easy:

SERP overview for "how to make fried rice"

3. Targeting keywords that are too difficult

An SEO joke goes like this: “The best place to hide a dead body is on page 2 of Google.”

Hidden within the joke is a kernel of truth—no one clicks beyond the first page of Google. That means for every keyword you want to target, there are only 10 spots for you to grab. (That number is even smaller these days, with Google introducing all kinds of SERP features.)

The situation is ultra-competitive.

Not for every keyword, though. Of course, some keywords are highly desirable, so every website in those relevant niches wants to rank for the keywords. To rank well here, you really need to compete hard, which usually means you need tons of resources. Other keywords are less competitive, so it’s easier to rank for them.

The mistake is thinking you can simply rank for a keyword without considering the competition. Now, I’m not saying you should avoid targeting a keyword because it’s competitive. If a keyword is important to your website and makes you money, you should target it.

But build up to those competitive keywords gradually. Start by prioritizing those keywords that are less competitive and you can rank for with your skills and resources.

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How to avoid this SEO mistake

As you’re looking for keywords in Keywords Explorer, you can filter them by Keyword Difficulty (KD).

KD is an SEO metric that estimates how hard it is to rank on the first page of Google for a given keyword. It is measured on a scale from 0 to 100, with the latter being the hardest to rank for.

KD filter in Matching terms report

Which KD range should you set?

The correct answer is it depends on many factors: the authority of your website, your ability to build backlinks, and more.

However, a good exercise you can consider is to look up the KD scores of the keywords that your website is already ranking for.

You can do this by entering your website into Ahrefs’ Site Explorer and visiting the Organic keywords report:

Organic keywords report results for Ahrefs' blog

This will give you a nice benchmark. But bear in mind this is just an estimate. It is no substitute for an actual study of the top-ranking pages and factoring in your own SEO skills and available resources.

4. Not building enough backlinks to rank

Links are an important Google ranking factor. Google’s Andrey Lipattsev confirmed it himself:

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Excerpt of article talking about Google's top three ranking signals

So, if you find that your pages are not ranking as high as you like, a key reason can simply be that you don’t have enough links.

For example, at Ahrefs, we would like to rank for the keyword “seo.” But if you look at the top-ranking pages for that keyword, they have tons (emphasis on tons) of backlinks.

SERP overview for "seo"

As of right now, our page simply doesn’t have enough:

Site Explorer overview for Ahrefs' beginner's guide to SEO

How to avoid this SEO mistake

Reach out to people who may be interested in your content and persuade them to link to you.

Here’s how you can find these people:

  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Content Explorer
  2. Search for your topic

For example, if we search for “french press,” you’ll see around 590,000 pages you can target.

Content Explorer search results for "french press"

That’s probably too many pages to look through, so let’s add a few filters to narrow the results down:

  • Domain Rating score: 30–90
  • Website traffic: 500+
  • Words: 500+
  • Language: English
  • One page per domain – Checked
  • Exclude homepages – Checked
  • Exclude subdomains – Checked
  • Live & Broken – Only live
  • Filter explicit results – On
Content Explorer search results with filters applied for "french press"

This reduces the number of pages to ~16,000 of the best ones. If this number is still too daunting for you, then you can always play around with the filters until you get a number you’re comfortable with.

When you have a list you’re satisfied with, go through each page and see if your article can add value as a resource. If the answer is yes, reach out to the writer or website owner and see if you can persuade them to link to your article.

5. Breaking Google’s Terms of Service when building links

You understand that links are important, so you’re actively building them. But along the way, you discover that some people ask for something in return for linking to your content.

Excerpt of email to Tim asking for something in exchange for a link

You know that buying backlinks is a no-no. But what about giving them something else in return, such as a reciprocal backlink or even one of your products? If it’s not cold, hard cash, it should be fine… right? After all, it’s kind of like giving away a free product to an influencer, hoping that they will give your brand a shout-out on their socials.

Right?

Unfortunately, no. According to Google’s Webmaster Guidelines, link schemes include:

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  • Buying or selling links that pass PageRank. This includes:
    • Exchanging money for links, or posts that contain links
    • Exchanging goods or services for links
    • Sending someone a “free” product in exchange for them writing it and including a link
  • Excessive link exchanges (“Link to me and I’ll link to you”) or partner pages exclusively for the sake of cross-linking.

So even if you’re not handing over fiat, it’s against Google’s Terms of Service—and you may get your site penalized.

How to avoid this SEO mistake

Promiscuous websites that readily exchange something in return for a link will usually leave a detectable footprint, which will sooner or later get picked up by Google and lead to a “link selling” penalty.

Simply put: Don’t offer payments or products when you’re doing your outreach.

6. Missing internal link opportunities

Internal links are important. Why?

  • Google uses them to discover new content.
  • They aid the flow of PageRank around your site. Generally speaking, the more internal links a page has, the higher its PageRank.
  • Google looks at the anchor texts of internal links to better understand the context. (It also looks at the text surrounding the anchor to understand the context.)

Yet, given all of these benefits, internal links are more often than not never prioritized. That’s a major mistake.

How to avoid this SEO mistake

Each time you publish a new page or post, do a site: search on your website to find other relevant content so that you can add internal links.

For example, I recently published a post about how to create a buyer persona. To find potential internal link opportunities, I’ll do a search on our blog:

Google SERP showing site:search results for term "buyer persona" on Ahrefs' blog

When I click through to our “go-to-market strategy” post, I see there are relevant anchors where I can add internal links:

Excerpt of an article showing potential anchor text

Doing this one by one for every post can be pretty troublesome. So a better way is to run a crawl on your site using Ahrefs’ Site Audit. (It’s free if you sign up for Ahrefs Webmaster Tools.) Once your crawl is done, go to the Link opportunities report.

Link opportunities report results

This report will show you relevant internal link opportunities. Go through the list and add internal links where relevant and wherever it feels natural.

7. Not letting Google crawl your content

If Google can’t crawl your content, it won’t be able to rank the said content.

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How to avoid this SEO mistake

Make sure you’re not blocking Googlebot from crawling your site.

Do this check by going to your robots.txt (yourdomain.com/robots.txt) and looking for these two snippets of code:

User-agent: Googlebot
Disallow: /

User-agent: *
Disallow: /

Both lines of code tell Googlebot it’s not allowed to crawl any pages on your site. To fix the issue, remove them.

8. Not letting Google index your content

No matter how hard you try, you can’t win if you’re not in the game. If your site or its pages are not indexed by Google, you can’t rank.

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That can happen, for example, if you’ve accidentally added a noindex tag on any of your pages. (Or perhaps, you or your developer added the tags during staging and forgot to remove them!)

Gif showing noindex tag that was added to a webpage

How to avoid this SEO mistake

You can use Google Search Console to check whether a specific page is indexed. To do that, paste the URL into the URL Inspection tool.

If the page is not indexed, the tool will state: “URL is not on Google.”

Example of “URL is not on Google” message shown in GSC

Alternatively, you can also run a crawl using Ahrefs’ Site Audit (via AWT). If you have pages that are noindexed, that will pop up as an issue:

Examples of some issues found by AWT

9. Having an extremely slow site

Page speed is a Google ranking factor. So are Core Web Vitals—metrics that are part of Google’s Page Experience signals used to measure user experience.

Not only will a slow site affect your Google rankings, but it will also impact your sales. According to Unbounce, nearly 70% of consumers admit that page speed impacts their willingness to buy from an online retailer.

How to avoid this SEO mistake

Run a website crawl using Site Audit (with AWT), and you can see how fast (or slow) your pages are:

Pie charts showing data on TTFB and load time distribution, respectively

You can also use other page speed testing tools like Google’s PageSpeed Insights or GTMetrix.

Then follow the guide below to learn the different tactics you can use to improve your page speed.

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10. Treating SEO as a one-time thing

SEO is not simply a matter of fixing the above nine mistakes and calling it a day.

Even if you’re ranking in pole position today, there is no guarantee that you’ll be number #1 tomorrow. Ranking high on search engines is a competition. Your competitors will be working hard and investing plenty of resources to knock you off the perch.

How to avoid this SEO mistake

SEO is an ongoing process. You’ll need to make a consistent effort to rank high and grow your search traffic.

That means you need an SEO strategy.

Creating an SEO strategy doesn’t have to be complicated. It just has to be a plan you can execute over and over again. As such, we recommend following what we call the “Orchard Strategy.”

Here’s the process:

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  1. Plant trees (pages)
  2. Pick low-hanging fruits (first-page keyword rankings)
  3. Squeeze more juice out of them (optimize)

Read the post below to learn more about how to execute the strategy:

Keep learning

You now have an understanding of what major SEO mistakes you could be making and how to avoid them. If you want to dig deeper and continue learning, check out these resources:

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Top Priorities, Challenges, And Opportunities

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Top Priorities, Challenges, And Opportunities

The world of search has seen massive change recently. Whether you’re still in the planning stages for this year or underway with your 2024 strategy, you need to know the new SEO trends to stay ahead of seismic search industry shifts.

It’s time to chart a course for SEO success in this changing landscape.

Watch this on-demand webinar as we explore exclusive survey data from today’s top SEO professionals and digital marketers to inform your strategy this year. You’ll also learn how to navigate SEO in the era of AI, and how to gain an advantage with these new tools.

You’ll hear:

  • The top SEO priorities and challenges for 2024.
  • The role of AI in SEO – how to get ahead of the anticipated disruption of SGE and AI overall, plus SGE-specific SEO priorities.
  • Winning SEO resourcing strategies and reporting insights to fuel success.

With Shannon Vize and Ryan Maloney, we’ll take a deep dive into the top trends, priorities, and challenges shaping the future of SEO.

Discover timely insights and unlock new SEO growth potential in 2024.

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View the slides below or check out the full webinar for all the details.

Join Us For Our Next Webinar!

10 Successful Ways To Improve Your SERP Rankings [With Ahrefs]

Reserve your spot and discover 10 quick and easy SEO wins to boost your site’s rankings.

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E-E-A-T’s Google Ranking Influence Decoded

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E-E-A-T's Google Ranking Influence Decoded

The idea that something is not a ranking factor that nevertheless plays a role in ranking websites seems to be logically irreconcilable. Despite seeming like a paradox that cancels itself out, SearchLiaison recently tweeted some comments that go a long way to understanding how to think about E-E-A-T and apply it to SEO.

What A Googler Said About E-E-A-T

Marie Haynes published a video excerpt on YouTube from an event at which a Googler spoke, essentially doubling down on the importance of E-A-T.

This is what he said:

“You know this hasn’t always been there in Google and it’s something that we developed about ten to twelve or thirteen years ago. And it really is there to make sure that along the lines of what we talked about earlier is that it really is there to ensure that the content that people consume is going to be… it’s not going to be harmful and it’s going to be useful to the user. These are principles that we live by every single day.

And E-A-T, that template of how we rate an individual site based off of Expertise, Authoritativeness and Trustworthiness, we do it to every single query and every single result. So it’s actually very pervasive throughout everything that we do .

I will say that the YMYL queries, the Your Money or Your Life Queries, such as you know when I’m looking for a mortgage or when I’m looking for the local ER,  those we have a particular eye on and we pay a bit more attention to those queries because clearly they’re some of the most important decisions that people can make.

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So I would say that E-A-T has a bit more of an impact there but again, I will say that E-A-T applies to everything, every single query that we actually look at.”

How can something be a part of every single search query and not be a ranking factor, right?

Background, Experience & Expertise In Google Circa 2012

Something to consider is that in 2012 Google’s senior engineer at the time, Matt Cutts, said that experience and expertise brings a measure of quality to content and makes it worthy of ranking.

Matt Cutts’ remarks on experience and expertise were made in an interview with Eric Enge.

Discussing whether the website of a hypothetical person named “Jane” deserves to rank with articles that are original variations of what’s already in the SERPs.

Matt Cutts observed:

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“While they’re not duplicates they bring nothing new to the table.

Google would seek to detect that there is no real differentiation between these results and show only one of them so we could offer users different types of sites in the other search results.

They need to ask themselves what really is their value add? …they need to figure out what… makes them special.

…if Jane is just churning out 500 words about a topic where she doesn’t have any background, experience or expertise, a searcher might not be as interested in her opinion.”

Matt then cites the example of Pulitzer Prize-Winning movie reviewer Roger Ebert as a person with the background, experience and expertise that makes his opinion valuable to readers and the content worthy of ranking.

Matt didn’t say that a webpage author’s background, experience and expertise were ranking factors. But he did say that these are the kinds of things that can differentiate one webpage from another and align it to what Google wants to rank.

He specifically said that Google’s algorithm detects if there is something different about it that makes it stand out. That was in 2012 but not much has changed because Google’s John Mueller says the same thing.

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For example, in 2020 John Mueller said that differentiation and being compelling is important for getting Google to notice and rank a webpage.

“So with that in mind, if you’re focused on kind of this small amount of content that is the same as everyone else then I would try to find ways to significantly differentiate yourselves to really make it clear that what you have on your website is significantly different than all of those other millions of ringtone websites that have kind of the same content.

…And that’s the same recommendation I would have for any kind of website that offers essentially the same thing as lots of other web sites do.

You really need to make sure that what you’re providing is unique and compelling and high quality so that our systems and users in general will say, I want to go to this particular website because they offer me something that is unique on the web and I don’t just want to go to any random other website.”

In 2021, in regard to getting Google to index a webpage, Mueller also said:

“Is it something the web has been waiting for? Or is it just another red widget?”

This thing about being compelling and different than other sites, it’s something that’s been a part of Google’s algorithm awhile, just like the Googler in the video said, just like Matt Cutts said and exactly like what Mueller has said as well.

Are they talking about signals?

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E-EA-T Algorithm Signals

We know there’s something in the algorithm that relates to someone’s expertise and background that Google’s looking for. The table is set and we can dig into the next step of what it all means.

A while back back I remember reading something that Marie Haynes said about E-A-T, she called it a framework. And I thought, now that’s an interesting thing she just did, she’s conceptualizing E-A-T.

When SEOs discussed E-A-T it was always in the context of what to do in order to demonstrate E-A-T. So they looked at the Quality Raters Guide for guidance, which kind of makes sense since it’s a guide, right?

But what I’m proposing is that the answer isn’t really in the guidelines or anything that the quality raters are looking for.

The best way to explain it is to ask you to think about the biggest part of Google’s algorithm, relevance.

What’s relevance? Is it something you have to do? It used to be about keywords and that’s easy for SEOs to understand. But it’s not about keywords anymore because Google’s algorithm has natural language understanding (NLU). NLU is what enables machines to understand language in the way that it’s actually spoken (natural language).

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So, relevance is just something that’s related or connected to something else. So, if I ask, how do I satiate my thirst? The answer can be water, because water quenches the thirst.

How is a site relevant to the search query: “how do I satiate my thirst?”

An SEO would answer the problem of relevance by saying that the webpage has to have the keywords that match the search query, which would be the words “satiate” and “thirst.”

The next step the SEO would take is to extract the related entities for “satiate” and “thirst” because every SEO “knows” they need to do entity research to understand how to make a webpage that answers the search query, “How do I satiate my thirst?”

Hypothetical Related entities:

  • Thirst: Water, dehydration, drink,
  • Satiate: Food, satisfaction, quench, fulfillment, appease

Now that the SEO has their entities and their keywords they put it all together and write a 600 word essay that uses all their keywords and entities so that their webpage is relevant for the search query, “How do I satiate my thirst?”

I think we can stop now and see how silly that is, right? If someone asked you, “How do I satiate my thirst?” You’d answer, “With water” or “a cold refreshing beer” because that’s what it means to be relevant.

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Relevance is just a concept. It doesn’t have anything to do with entities or keywords in today’s search algorithms because the machine is understanding search queries as natural language, even more so with AI search engines.

Similarly, E-E-A-T is also just a concept. It doesn’t have anything to do with author bios, LinkedIn profiles, it doesn’t have anything at all to do with making your content say that you handled the product that’s being reviewed.

Here’s what SearchLiaison recently said about an E-E-A-T, SEO and Ranking:

“….just making a claim and talking about a ‘rigorous testing process’ and following an ‘E-E-A-T checklist’ doesn’t guarantee a top ranking or somehow automatically cause a page to do better.”

Here’s the part where SearchLiaison ties a bow around the gift of E-E-A-T knowledge:

“We talk about E-E-A-T because it’s a concept that aligns with how we try to rank good content.”

E-E-A-T Can’t Be Itemized On A Checklist

Remember how we established that relevance is a concept and not a bunch of keywords and entities? Relevance is just answering the question.

E-E-A-T is the same thing. It’s not something that you do. It’s closer to something that you are.

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SearchLiaison elaborated:

“…our automated systems don’t look at a page and see a claim like “I tested this!” and think it’s better just because of that. Rather, the things we talk about with E-E-A-T are related to what people find useful in content. Doing things generally for people is what our automated systems seek to reward, using different signals.”

A Better Understanding Of E-E-A-T

I think it’s clear now how E-E-A-T isn’t something that’s added to a webpage or is something that is demonstrated on the webpage. It’s a concept, just like relevance.

A good way to think o fit is if someone asks you a question about your family and you answer it. Most people are pretty expert and experienced enough to answer that question. That’s what E-E-A-T is and how it should be treated when publishing content, regardless if it’s YMYL content or a product review, the expertise is just like answering a question about your family, it’s just a concept.

Featured Image by Shutterstock/Roman Samborskyi

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Google Announces A New Carousel Rich Result

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Google Announces A New Carousel Rich Result

Google announced a new carousel rich result that can be used for local businesses, products, and events which will show a scrolling horizontal carousel displaying all of the items in the list. It’s very flexible and can even be used to create a top things to do in a city list that combines hotels, restaurants, and events. This new feature is in beta, which means it’s being tested.

The new carousel rich result is for displaying lists in a carousel format. According to the announcement the rich results is limited to the following types:

LocalBusiness and its subtypes, for example:
– Restaurant
– Hotel
– VacationRental
– Product
– Event

An example of subtypes is Lodgings, which is a subset of LocalBusiness.

Here is the Schema.org hierarchical structure that shows the LodgingBusiness type as being a subset of the LocalBusiness type.

  • Thing > Organization > LocalBusiness > LodgingBusiness
  • Thing > Place > LocalBusiness > LodgingBusiness

ItemList Structured Data

The carousel displays “tiles” that contain information from the webpage that’s about the price, ratings and images. The order of what’s in the ItemList structured data is the order that they will be displayed in the carousel.

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Publishers must use the ItemList structured data in order to become eligible for the new rich result

All information in the ItemList structured data must be on the webpage. Just like any other structured data, you can’t stuff the structured data with information that is not visible on the webpage itself.

There are two important rules when using this structured data:

  1. 1. The ItemList type must be the top level container for the structured data.
  2. 2. All the URLs of in the list must point to different webpages on the same domain.

The part about the ItemList being the top level container means that the structured data cannot be merged together with another structured data where the top-level container is something other than ItemList.

For example, the structured data must begin like this:

<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "ItemList", "itemListElement": [ { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 1,

A useful quality of this new carousel rich result is that publishers can mix and match the different entities as long as they’re within the eligible structured data types.

Eligible Structured Data Types

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  • LocalBusiness and its subtypes
  • Product
  • Event

Google’s announcement explains how to mix and match the different structured data types:

“You can mix and match different types of entities (for example, hotels, restaurants), if needed for your scenario. For example, if you have a page that has both local events and local businesses.”

Here is an example of a ListItem structured data that can be used in a webpage about Things To Do In Paris.

The following structured data is for two events and a local business (the Eiffel Tower):

<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "ItemList", "itemListElement": [ { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 1, "item": { "@type": "Event", "name": "Paris Seine River Dinner Cruise", "image": [ "https://example.com/photos/1x1/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/4x3/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/16x9/photo.jpg" ], "offers": { "@type": "Offer", "price": 45.00, "priceCurrency": "EUR" }, "aggregateRating": { "@type": "AggregateRating", "ratingValue": 4.2, "reviewCount": 690 }, "url": "https://www.example.com/event-location1" } }, { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 2, "item": { "@type": "LocalBusiness", "name": "Notre-Dame Cathedral", "image": [ "https://example.com/photos/1x1/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/4x3/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/16x9/photo.jpg" ], "priceRange": "$", "aggregateRating": { "@type": "AggregateRating", "ratingValue": 4.8, "reviewCount": 4220 }, "url": "https://www.example.com/localbusiness-location" } }, { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 3, "item": { "@type": "Event", "name": "Eiffel Tower With Host Summit Tour", "image": [ "https://example.com/photos/1x1/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/4x3/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/16x9/photo.jpg" ], "offers": { "@type": "Offer", "price": 59.00, "priceCurrency": "EUR" }, "aggregateRating": { "@type": "AggregateRating", "ratingValue": 4.9, "reviewCount": 652 }, "url": "https://www.example.com/event-location2" } } ] } </script>

Be As Specific As Possible

Google’s guidelines recommends being as specific as possible but that if there isn’t a structured data type that closely matches with the type of business then it’s okay to use the more generic LocalBusiness structured data type.

“Depending on your scenario, you may choose the best type to use. For example, if you have a list of hotels and vacation rentals on your page, use both Hotel and VacationRental types. While it’s ideal to use the type that’s closest to your scenario, you can choose to use a more generic type (for example, LocalBusiness).”

Can Be Used For Products

A super interesting use case for this structured data is for displaying a list of products in a carousel rich result.

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The structured data for that begins as a ItemList structured data type like this:

<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "ItemList", "itemListElement": [ { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 1, "item": { "@type": "Product",

The structured data can list images, ratings, reviewCount, and currency just like any other product listing, but doing it like this will make the webpage eligible for the carousel rich results.

Google has a list of recommended recommended properties that can be used with the Products version, such as offers, offers.highPrice, and offers.lowPrice.

Good For Local Businesses and Merchants

This new structured data is a good opportunity for local businesses and publishers that list events, restaurants and lodgings to get in on a new kind of rich result.

Using this structured data doesn’t guarantee that it will display as a rich result, it only makes it eligible for it.

This new feature is in beta, meaning that it’s a test.

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Read the new developer page for this new rich result type:

Structured data carousels (beta)

Featured Image by Shutterstock/RYO Alexandre

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