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11 Internet Marketing Strategies That Work

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11 Internet Marketing Strategies That Work

Internet marketing can seem quite daunting and complicated. There are so many possibilities. But which strategies should you start with?

To help answer that, we’ve dissected internet marketing into its most basic strategies. We’ve also simplified them so you can get started right away.

In this article, we’ll cover 11 internet marketing strategies that work:

  1. Search engine optimization
  2. Content marketing
  3. PPC marketing
  4. Email marketing
  5. Affiliate marketing
  6. Influencer marketing
  7. Video marketing
  8. Social media marketing
  9. Podcasting
  10. Conversion rate optimization
  11. Reputation management

1. Search engine optimization

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the practice of optimizing a website or webpage to increase the quantity and quality of its traffic from a search engine’s organic results. When your pages rank high on the search engines and maintain their positions, you can get almost free, passive traffic to your website consistently.

Line graph showing amount of monthly organic traffic to Ahrefs

The amount of monthly organic traffic coming to Ahrefs.

How to do it

If you want to rank high on search engines, you have to target topics that your audience is searching for. Finding what these topics are is a process known as keyword research, and the easiest way to begin is to use a keyword research tool like Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer.

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Here’s how:

  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer
  2. Enter one or a few terms relevant to your website or niche (e.g., if you sell coffee equipment, then you may want to enter keywords like coffee, french press, cappuccino, etc)
  3. Go to the Matching terms report
List of keywords with corresponding data such as KD, volume, etcList of keywords with corresponding data such as KD, volume, etc

From here, you’ll want to look through the list and pick out relevant topics you wish to target. Generally speaking, the “ideal” keywords are those with high Traffic Potential (TP) and low Keyword Difficulty (KD).

You can use the filters to quickly narrow down such topics.

Keywords Explorer filtersKeywords Explorer filters

Then you’ll want to create a page that deserves to rank for that keyword. There are a few aspects to this process. But the most important part is to figure out why searchers are looking for that topic. This is known as search intent.

You can do this by looking at what’s currently ranking on the search engine results pages (SERPs) for your topic. For example, if we’re targeting the topic “best frying pans,” we’ll see that most of the top-ranking pages are blog posts about the best non-stick frying pans.

Google SERP for "best frying pans"Google SERP for "best frying pans"

If we want to rank for this keyword, we’ll likely have to follow suit.

Once you’ve created and published that page, you’ll have to build links because they’re an important Google ranking factor. There are many ways to get backlinks, so I recommend reading our guide to link building.

Finally, you’ll want to make sure you get the technical aspects of your website right. (After all, if Google can’t find and index your pages, it can’t rank them on the SERPs.) The easiest way is to run an audit of your website with Ahrefs’ Site Audit. You can do this for free using Ahrefs Webmaster Tools.

Recommended reading: SEO: The Complete Guide for Beginners 

Content marketing is the process of creating and distributing content to attract and retain customers.

How to do it

To get started, fill in the content strategy canvas. Your goal is to answer five simple questions:

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  1. Who are you creating content for?
  2. Why are you creating content?
  3. What type of content will you create?
  4. Where will you publish the content?
  5. How will you create the content?
A "content strategy canvas" table where the five questions are answered in detailA "content strategy canvas" table where the five questions are answered in detail

Completing the content strategy canvas should set you on the right path to creating content that will improve your business. However, don’t forget to promote your content too.

Promoting content means not waiting for your target audience to discover your content. Instead, it’s about actively putting the content in front of them. Follow the checklist in this post or this video to get more eyeballs on your content:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoVYweKH4ck&ab_channel=Ahrefs

Recommended reading: Content Marketing: A Comprehensive Guide 

3. Pay-per-click marketing

Pay-per-click (PPC) marketing is a form of online advertising where advertisers pay a fee each time someone clicks their ad.

Search engine ads are the most common ad format in PPC marketing. Other formats include display ads on websites and social media ads, such as those you see on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

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How to do it

You’ll first need to choose a platform you want to advertise on. You should only pay for ads on platforms where your audience exists. For example, if you’re selling enterprise software to C-level executives, you may not want to advertise on TikTok. (Of course, if you have data showing these execs in your industry are on TikTok often, then it makes sense to advertise there.)

After that, you should get familiar with the platform. Explore the ad platform by clicking around or take a course. These platforms typically offer educational resources to help you learn how to run ads (here’s one from Google).

Ads can succeed or fail based on your targeting, so make sure you have data to back up your targeting choices. For example, if you’re running search ads, you’ll need to do keyword research. You’ll need to know what people search for and then how much you’ll be paying for clicks on average.

Matching terms report results for term "espresso machine"Matching terms report results for term "espresso machine"

You should also make sure you’ve set up your tracking properly.

Budget-wise, decide on a daily budget that won’t make a big dent in your overall marketing budget and start with that. Monitor and optimize your campaigns regularly. Once you start getting solid results, you can increase your budget.

Finally, creatives and copy matter too in PPC marketing. Make sure you’re constantly experimenting with different images, videos, headlines, body copies, and more to see what resonates with your audience!

Recommended reading: PPC Marketing: Beginner’s Guide to Pay-Per-Click Ads 

Email marketing is any kind of marketing messaging done through the channel of email.

How to do it

Email marketing doesn’t just involve sending emails. It also includes:

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  • Building an email list.
  • Designing, writing, and sending emails to the subscribers on your list.
  • Segmenting the list.
  • Deciding when to send the email.
  • Monitoring the results.
  • Curating the email list.

To begin, you’ll need a list of email addresses to send messages to. The easiest way to build this list is to offer an incentive to website visitors in return for subscribing. For example, e-commerce stores tend to offer discount coupons, such as what Frank Body does:

Text field to fill in personal particulars to get discount coupons from Frank BodyText field to fill in personal particulars to get discount coupons from Frank Body

You’ll also need to decide what kind of emails you want to send to your subscribers. At the basic level, you should have a welcome email with the incentive you promised earlier. In Frank Body’s case, its first email features the 10% discount code.

But what should you send from that point onward? Unfortunately, there’s no clear-cut “right” answer. It’ll take a mix of intuition and experimentation to figure out what’s best.

For example, here’s an illustration of a potential email marketing workflow.

Flowchart of example email workflowFlowchart of example email workflow

Even this sample workflow is pretty complex. There are many elements to get right. For us at Ahrefs, we keep things simple—we promise a weekly newsletter, and that’s all we send:

Example of Ahrefs' weekly newsletterExample of Ahrefs' weekly newsletter

Recommended reading: The Ultimate Guide to Email Marketing 

Affiliate marketing is where other people promote your products in return for a commission. For example, if your product costs $100, you can pay an affiliate $10 for each sale they generate for you.

How to do it

You’ll first need to create an affiliate program that people can sign up for. This gives them a unique link they can use to promote your product and track the sales they generate.

Then you’ll need to look for people who may want to promote your product.

The easiest way is to look for people who are already promoting competing products.

Here’s how:

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  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Site Explorer
  2. Enter the domain of a competing product
  3. Go to the Backlinks report
  4. Look for an affiliate footprint in the URL

For example, many of the backlinks to bluehost.com go to URLs with /track/ in them:

List of referring pages List of referring pages

These are most likely affiliate links, so we can find all the websites promoting this product by filtering for backlinks with this footprint (/track/) in the target URL and toggling “One link per domain”:

Backlinks report with "One link per domain" filter appliedBacklinks report with "One link per domain" filter applied

Recommended reading: How to Create a Successful Affiliate Program for Your Business 

Influencers are people who have an active, sizable audience (usually on social media) and the ability to influence their audience to do something.

Influencer marketing is the practice of working with influencers to promote your brand’s messages, products, or services.

How to do it

The easiest way to find influencers is to use existing third-party tools. And there are different tools for the different social media platforms. Here’s a list to look through:

  1. Followerwonk (Twitter)
  2. Influenx (YouTube)
  3. Heepsy (Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, Twitch)
  4. inBeat (TikTok, Instagram)
  5. Intellifluence (Reddit, SoundCloud, podcasts, Amazon reviews, iOS and Android reviews, Twitch, LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, TikTok)
  6. Grin (Twitch, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, TikTok)
  7. Influence.co (Facebook, Pinterest, Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube, Twitter, blogs)
  8. HypeAuditor (Instagram, TikTok, YouTube, Twitter, Twitch) 

When you’ve gathered a list of influencers, don’t reach out just yet. Since social platforms can be gameable, some of these influencers may have tons of fake followers. A certain percentage of fake followers is inevitable, but you don’t want them to be a significant percentage of those influencers’ following.

A quick way to check is to use a tool like SparkToro’s Fake Followers Audit (Twitter only) or HypeAuditor’s Instagram Audit.

Beyond the quantity of following, you’ll want to make sure the quality of engagement exists too. If an influencer has a lot of followers but barely gets any comments on their posts, it’s a potential red flag.

The absolute number of likes, comments, retweets, etc., doesn’t matter either. Quality does. Look out for genuine comments or conversations. If an influencer posts something and the comments look like these…

List of Instagram comments with the same few emojisList of Instagram comments with the same few emojis

… then that’s a potential red flag.

Once you’ve narrowed down the list to those influencers with the amount of reach and resonance you want and made sure that the influencers’ image and reputation represent your brand well, reach out and ask to collaborate.

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Recommended reading: Influencer Marketing: Definition, Examples, and Tactics 

Video marketing is using videos to promote and educate your target audience. It’s also used to increase brand awareness and social engagement, allowing you to reach new and bigger audiences.

How to do it

To begin, you need to know what kind of videos you want to create. There are three main objectives for video marketing: brand awareness, education, or entertainment.

If your goal is to create videos for brand awareness or entertainment, then the good and bad news is there is no template. It all boils down to your creativity.

If your goal is to create educational content, then you can do keyword research to see what kind of topics or questions people are searching for on YouTube.

Here’s how:

  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer
  2. Switch the tab to YouTube
  3. Enter a relevant keyword or keywords
  4. Go to the Matching terms report
  5. Switch the tab to Questions

Matching terms report results Matching terms report results

Once you’ve picked out the topics you want to target, create a video that’ll rank for them on YouTube. Watch this video to learn how:

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NY3y0V9UDwM&ab_channel=Ahrefs

Recommended reading: The Simple (But Complete) Guide to Video Marketing 

8. Social media marketing

Social media marketing is the use of social media like Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn to market a company’s products or services.

Ahrefs' LinkedIn post of a blog article about homepage SEOAhrefs' LinkedIn post of a blog article about homepage SEO

How to do it

To begin, you’ll want to have a presence on major social platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn. Even if you’re not going to be active on those platforms, having a page or brand account offers legitimacy and also protects your brand account from potential squatters.

Social media is all about content. To build a following and gain engagement, you’ll need to post frequently. Understandably, being active on so many different social media platforms can be difficult if you are resource-stretched.

On a basic level, you should be active on the standard social networks: Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

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So if you’re already creating content, you can always share those articles, videos, or podcasts on your social media pages. For example, all we do on our Facebook page is share our newly published content:

Ahrefs' Facebook post of a blog article about marketing automationAhrefs' Facebook post of a blog article about marketing automation

Furthermore, you can always repurpose content on social media. In fact, that’s what we do all the time.

For example, this tweet is an image from our article on doing a content audit:

If there’s a platform you want to invest further in, consider creating custom content for it. Watch how other brands and influencers craft their content, and you’ll get an idea of what works and what doesn’t.

Experimentation is the name of the game. Following tried-and-tested formats is a good idea, but don’t be afraid to try new things.

That was how Wendy’s did it, with a completely different tone, format, and identity compared to other brands at that time. (If you see brand accounts being funny or sarcastic today, you can credit it to Wendy’s.)

Podcasting is a type of content marketing that focuses on producing audible content. It is great for brand-building and growing an audience.

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How to do it

There are two major strategies when it comes to podcasting:

  1. Start your own podcast
  2. Appear on someone else’s podcast

Starting a podcast is an entire topic on its own, so I’ll leave links to resources that you can consume:

At Ahrefs, we do have experience appearing on podcasts. In fact, our chief marketing officer, Tim Soulo, once set a goal to appear on 20 podcasts in a year and succeeded.

To appear on podcasts, you need a list of podcasts to be a guest on. Besides Googling for the top industry podcasts, one way to find them is to look for someone in your niche who’s already appearing on them.

Here’s how:

  1. Find someone notable in your niche who has been appearing on podcasts
  2. Enter their domain into Ahrefs’ Site Explorer
  3. Set the mode to Exact URL
  4. Go to the Backlinks report
List of referring pages List of referring pages

Sift through the results for relevant podcasts in your niche. When you have a list, pitch to the shows.

Pitching is pretty straightforward. You either follow a show’s application process…

Excerpt of a podcast show's instructions regarding its application processExcerpt of a podcast show's instructions regarding its application process

… or reach out by email and pitch yourself as a guest. First, find the email address. Then in your pitch, try to cover the three Ws:

  • Who? Explain who you are, who you work for, etc
  • Why? Explain why you’ll be a good podcast guest, i.e., sell yourself
  • What? Explain what you want to talk about

Recommended reading: How to Use Podcasts for Link Building 

10. Conversion rate optimization

A conversion is when a website visitor takes an action you want them to take on your website. So conversion rate optimization (CRO) is the process of optimizing your website or its pages to improve or encourage more of the actions you want visitors to take.

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How to do it

Like SEO, CRO is not one and done. You can always optimize more. So rather than being one-off hacks you apply to your website, CRO is a systematic process informed by data.

As CRO expert Brian Massey puts it, CRO is “about meaningful tests backed by thorough conversion research and executed using a disciplined, step-by-step process.”

It involves understanding user psychology, user experience (UX) and user interface (UI) design, copywriting, persuasion, running A/B tests, statistics, understanding and analyzing data, and more.

Here’s a simplified example of what CRO may look like. Let’s say we want to improve the conversion rate of the Ahrefs Webmaster Tools page. That is, we want more people who visit the page to sign up for AWT.

Excerpt of AWT's landing pageExcerpt of AWT's landing page

To do that, we may want to systematically A/B test things like:

  • The page design.
  • The headline.
  • The sub-headline.
  • The call-to-action (CTA) button.
  • Social proof (e.g., testimonials, case studies, etc.).

And more.

A note to bear in mind, though: For your A/B tests to be statistically significant (i.e., prove you can attribute any increase or decline to the change you made and that the change is not by chance), you’ll need a significant amount of traffic coming to your website.

So while CRO is important, it’s not something you do right from the get-go. Focus on using the other internet marketing strategies to drive more traffic to your website first before you even consider running split tests.

Recommended reading: Conversion Rate Optimization Guide by CXL

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11. Reputation management

Online reputation management (ORM) is the practice of using digital marketing tactics and channels to help shape the public perception of a brand, an organization, or an individual online.

How to do it

Reputation management includes many different activities. For example, it may involve using social media to jump in on conversations and tackle negative or unhappy comments about your company.

By acknowledging the source of unhappiness and listening to the customer, we were able to deflect anger and improve our relationship with him.

But it’s not just about social media. You can do reputation management in search engines too. For example, you may find articles ranking high on Google that speak negatively about your brand or perpetuate a misconception.

If it’s something you can correct, you should try to nip it in the bud.

Here’s how to find such articles:

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  1. Go to Ahrefs’ Content Explorer
  2. Search for your brand name and exclude your own site [-site:yourdomain.com]
  3. Set a Page traffic filter to something high (e.g., 1,000+ visits per month)
Excerpt of Content Explorer results Excerpt of Content Explorer results

For example, we found a post by HubSpot about the best digital marketing tools. Even though it is a huge compliment about our toolset (thanks, HubSpot!), it mentions something inaccurate about our data:

Excerpt of HubSpot's article about AhrefsExcerpt of HubSpot's article about Ahrefs

Instead of “150 million keywords” in the U.S, we actually have 4.4 billion keywords. And instead of 150 countries, we have more than 200.

Excerpt of Ahrefs' "big data" page showing key stats about our toolsetExcerpt of Ahrefs' "big data" page showing key stats about our toolset

Plus, the screenshot of our UI it featured is outdated.

We’re proud of our data, and the ones mentioned by HubSpot are way off from our current state. And it may set up wrong or different expectations from users who discover us via this article.

In this case, we can reach out and ask HubSpot or the author to update these metrics.

Recommended reading: A 5-Step Online Reputation Management Guide (That ANYONE Can Follow) 

Final thoughts

This list of internet marketing strategies is by no means exhaustive. But it should have educated you on some of the more popular and timeless ones.

When executed correctly, the strategies work and will continue to work.

Did I miss out on any important internet marketing strategies? Let me know on Twitter.

 

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7 Data-Driven Content Strategy Tips For Improving Conversions

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7 Data-Driven Content Strategy Tips For Improving Conversions

There’s an old maxim in the marketing world, “content is king.” This has been true as long as search engine optimization has been around, and probably dates back even further in the world of general marketing.

But as simple as that adage is, it leaves a lot of room for interpretation, namely what kind of content?

In those early SEO days, it meant identifying your keywords and jamming them into pages anywhere they would fit.

But modern digital marketers are smarter (not to mention that strategy doesn’t work anymore).

These days, successful content starts with a plan that’s backed up by numbers, a data-driven content strategy, if you will.

But what exactly does that mean?

In simple terms, it means developing content using an approach built on user information. This can include information like demographics, survey answers, consumer preferences, etc.

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You probably don’t need to be told why this is important, but just to make sure there’s no doubt, let’s be clear: Using a data-driven content strategy helps you decide where to spend your time, effort, and money.

In other words, you have finite resources. You don’t want to waste them on people who aren’t likely to convert.

A data-driven content strategy allows you to tailor your marketing campaigns to generate the best ROI.

For the purposes of search engine and PPC specialists, it can help you decide which keywords to go after, ensuring you’re targeting the right audience.

Sounds simple enough, right? All you need to do is pop open your content research tool and look for commonalities, right? Sorry to burst your bubble, but there’s a bit more to it than that.

But never fear, that’s why you’re here.

In this helpful guide, we’ll give you a step-by-step approach to developing, implementing, and optimizing your very own data-driven content strategy.

Ready to get started?

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1. Set Your Content Goals

The very first thing you need to decide is what you’re hoping to accomplish. You can’t be all things to all people, so you need to make some choices.

Do you want to increase traffic? Are you looking to make sales? Do you want more leads?

Determine what your content goals are and identify the channels best suited to meet them. Once you’ve done this, you can establish your key performance indicators (KPIs).

Be sure to keep this in mind while you’re creating content.

Everything you add to your website or campaign should serve a purpose. If you’re not sure what it’s doing, your audience won’t know either.

2. Define Your Target Audience

Now that you know what you’re trying to achieve, it’s time to figure out who to go after to make it happen.

Comb through the demographic data and other information you have access to. Spot commonalities that occur across many or some of your targets.

Many marketers find it helpful to create customer personas. Using your data, imagine a typical person for each of the various roles you’re targeting.

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For example, you may have a prospect persona, a lead persona, a buyer persona and a repeat persona.

Put yourself in the shoes of these imaginary people.

What type of language resonates with them? What is their highest level of education? Do they want professionalism or personability? Why are they on your website? What do they hope to accomplish with your help? Be as detailed as you can.

Many marketers even give them a name. For example, if you were creating personas for your plumbing supply company, you may have:

Lead Larry – 45 years old

A mid-career plumber, Lead Larry owns his own one-man business. He makes $75,000 a year. He went to a trade school and his work van is 6 years old. He’s looking for a way to reduce overhead and find cheaper parts than his local supply company. He values hard work, honesty, and professionalism.

Be as creative and detailed as you like, just remember this isn’t a fiction-writing exercise. You’re creating personas based on your typical target, so keep your persona in line with who they actually are.

3. Review Your Competitor’s Content And Do Topical Research

Now it’s time to take a look at what the competition is doing. Maybe they’re just flying by the seat of their pants, but they’re probably putting some effort into their campaigns, too.

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Review what they’re doing and look for what appears to be working.

For example, if they’re blogging, they may have a view counter on the page. If so, what type of blogs are getting the best results?

Look for trends in your industry. What’s everyone talking about? Is there a big trade show coming up? Or a new technology about to be released?

Figure out who you’re competing with for clicks, not just to see what’s working for them, but also to gain ideas for content of your own. Start making a list of things you want to cover.

If there are influencers in your niche, this is also a good time to check and see what they’re posting about.

4. Conduct Keyword Research

Once you’ve settled on what your content should be, it’s time to perform that old SEO staple: keyword research.

Using a tool like Google Analytics, Semrush, or something platform-specific like YouTube’s Search Insights, figure out the type of language your content needs to use.

This will help you in more than just the SEO aspect, too.

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Using keywords in your content demonstrates to your audience that you speak the same language they do. And that doesn’t mean English, it means using the nomenclature everyone in the niche will understand.

Going back to our plumbing supply example, that means referring to a product as a “three-fourths full port threaded ball valve,” rather than a “metal connection thingy.”

Okay, that’s a ridiculous example, but you get the point.

The good thing is that you probably already have a working, if not expert knowledge of this.

5. Create Content That Aligns With Your Goals

If you remember, the very first step to creating a data-driven content plan was to determine your goals.

Now, equipped with everything you’ve done since then, it’s time to create the content that addresses them.

Don’t be intimidated. You don’t have to be F. Scott Fitzgerald to write the kind of content your audience wants. And you’ve already done a lot of the foundational work – now it’s just time to put everything together.

Your content could take nearly any form, videos, blog posts, infographics, case studies, or white papers.

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If you’re not comfortable doing these on your own, it should be reasonably easy to find a writer or videographer in your area or extended network. Just ask your connections for recommendations.

If you’re still not confident in your ability to deliver or you can’t afford to hire someone, don’t worry. We have an excellent piece that will walk you through everything you need to know about content creation.

6. Promote Your Content On The Right Channels

You’ve created your masterpiece of relevant content. Now it’s time to share it with the world. But how do you do that? Do you just post it on your corporate blog and wait for Google to index it?

You could take that kind of passive approach, but this is great stuff you’ve just made. Everyone in your niche will want to consume it. And to make sure you get the eyes you want on it, it’s time to promote it.

But before you go linking to it on Facebook, Digg, LinkedIn, and every other social media platform and aggregator site you can think of, pause for a minute.

When you were developing your user personas, you hopefully received some data about where your targets live online.

Are they regular Twitter users? Do they haunt industry-specific forums? Are you connected to them via Slack or other instant messenger apps?

Find out where they hang out and post away. In most cases, if you’re not sure if your targets use a platform or not, you should just go ahead and post anyway.

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There are some sites where you can be dinged for unpopular content (Reddit, for example), but most of the time, there’s no harm.

This is also a time to start thinking about how you can repurpose your new content.

Do you have an opportunity for a guest blog post on another site? Or, would your new infographic fit perfectly in your next investor report?

If your data-driven content is built on the solid principles we’ve discussed, it will get engagements.

7. Use Analytics To Measure Results

After your content goes live, you can begin measuring your ROI to see what you did well, where you missed the mark, and what could be optimized to perform better.

This is where the KPIs discussed back in step one come back into play.

Some of these are easier to track than others.

If increasing sales or conversions was your goal, you should have data that backs up performance. Likewise, if you set out to improve traffic to your website, you should have the analytics to track that.

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Things like brand visibility can be a bit trickier.

Regardless of what it is you’re using to determine success, you should find the data you need to track performance in Google Analytics.

For a detailed walkthrough of this process, we’ve provided information on exactly how you can measure content marketing success.

A Data-Driven Content Strategy Is A Winning One

Data is a marketer’s best friend. It tells you exactly what works, what doesn’t, and often, why that’s the case.

And a data-driven content strategy is vital for success in today’s hyper-competitive business and SEO environment.

Use the tools available to you to gather data – that’s why they’re there.

Learn to identify what the numbers are telling you and use them to help you craft the kind of content that not only attracts views but gets shares and achieves your goals.

More Resources:

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Featured Image: metamorworks/Shutterstock

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