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LinkedIn Provides Insight into How its Feed Algorithm Works in New Video Series

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LinkedIn is currently seeing ‘record levels’ or user engagement, but much of that is seemingly dominated by re-posts from other platforms, spam, vaguely topical polls, and various other low-interest posting actions, designed specifically to generate shallow engagement.

At least, that’s how it feels, but LinkedIn is working to improve this, and today, LinkedIn has kicked off a new initiative to provide more transparency into how it’s working to combat these elements, and improve your LinkedIn experience.

As explained by LinkedIn:

Starting today and over the next several weeks, we’ll publish “Mythbusting the Feed”, a series of blog posts and on-platform content that will aim to provide greater insights into how our product works, and addressing common misconceptions and assumptions. Our ultimate goal is to be transparent with you on how we think about the feed, and how things work.

The first two videos in the series are now active, with LinkedIn’s VP of Engineering Sabry Tozin explaining what types of content LinkedIn seeks to amplify in-stream:

As well as the alignment between professional and personal growth via LinkedIn content:

The latter is probably a key focus note, with many seemingly off-topic posts potentially falling into the more ‘personal’ category.

Should you be posting the same updates that you share on Facebook to LinkedIn as well, where your audience will be professionals and those in your peer network? In most cases, probably not, but as Tozin explains, there is some crossover that’s acceptable, and aligns with LinkedIn’s use case.

That’s interesting insight to have – but really, what LinkedIn users more likely want to know is what gets more traction on the platform, and what’s likely to be penalized by its algorithms.

LinkedIn hasn’t traditionally provided a heap of insight on this (hence this new initiative), but it has previously noted that:

So if you want to maximize your content performance on LinkedIn, you probably want to steer away from these elements, and focus on crafting relevant, engaging posts that align with your target audience.

That, of course, won’t stop some people from re-sharing viral posts from other apps as a means to lure cheap engagement.

But LinkedIn’s hoping to be able to provide more oversight into how it’s tackling such with this new initiative, which could help you build a more effective, engaging presence in the app.

The first two videos (above) are fairly general, but LinkedIn says that it has more info coming, including:

  • Mythbusting the Feed: How the Algorithm Works and Personalizing the Feed
  • Mythbusting the Feed: Content Distribution and How We Work to Address Bias

Hopefully these elements will have more specific, actionable tips to help improve your LinkedIn approach.

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17 Content Options for Each Stage of the Sales Journey [Infographic]

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17 Content Options for Each Stage of the Sales Journey [Infographic]

Looking to formulate a better content strategy for 2023?

This will help – the team from Orbit Media has put together a listing of 17 content formats, and where they fit within the sales funnel which could provide some inspiration for your planning.

There are some good pointers here, with specific approaches that you can take at each stage of the journey.

Check out the full listing below – while you can read more on the Orbit Media website.

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Meta Soars by Most in Decade, Adding $100 Billion in Value

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Meta Soars by Most in Decade, Adding $100 Billion in Value

Correction: February 2, 2023 This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: An earlier version of this article misstated how much Meta expected to spend on its deal with the virtual reality start-up Within. It is $400 million, not $400 billion. Meta’s stock surged on Thursday …

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Twitter’s Cancelling Free Access to its API, Which Will Shut Down Hundreds of Apps

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Twitter’s Cancelling Free Access to its API, Which Will Shut Down Hundreds of Apps

Well, this is certainly problematic.

Twitter has announced that, as of February 9th, it’s cutting off free access to its API, which is the access point that many, many apps, bot accounts, and other tools use to function.

That means that a heap of Twitter analytics apps, management tools, schedulers, automated updates – a range of key info and insight options will soon cease to function. Which seems like the sort of thing that, if you were Twitter, you’d want to keep on your app.

But that’s not really how Twitter 2.0 is looking to operate – in a bid to rake in as much revenue as absolutely possible, in any way that it can, Twitter will now look to charge all of these apps and tools. But most, I’d hazard a guess, will simply cease to function.

The bigger business apps already pay for full API access – your Hootsuite’s and your Sprout Social’s – so they’ll likely be unaffected. But it could stop them from offering free plans, which would have a big impact on their business models.

The announcement follows Twitter’s recent API change which cut off a heap of Twitter posting tools, in order, seemingly, to stop users accessing the platform through a third-party UI. 

Now, even more Twitter tools will go extinct, a broad spread of apps and functions that contribute to the real-time ecosystem that Twitter has become. Their loss, if that’s what happens, will have big impacts on overall Twitter activity.

On the other hand, some will see this as another element in Twitter’s crackdown on bots, which Twitter chief Elon Musk has made a personal mission to eradicate. Musk has taken some drastic measures to kill off bots, some of which are having an impact, but Musk himself has also admitted that such efforts are reducing overall platform engagement

This, too, could be a killer in this respect

It’ll also open the door to Twitter competitors, as many automated update apps will switch to other platforms. This relates to things like updates on downtime from video games, weather apps, and more. There are also tools like GIF generators and auto responders – there’s a range of tools that could now look for a new home on Mastodon, or some other Twitter replicant. 

In this respect, it seems like a flawed move, which is also largely ignorant of how the developer community has facilitated Twitter’s growth. 

But Elon and Co. are going to do things their own way, whether outside commentators agree or not – and maybe this is actually a path to gaining new Twitter data customers, and boosting the company’s income. 

But I doubt it.

If there are any third-party Twitter apps that you use, it’ll be worth checking in to see if they’re impacted before next week.



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