Connect with us

SOCIAL

New Report Looks at Influencer Payment Expectations Based on Audience Size and Platform

Published

on

What should you expect to pay an influencer for an Instagram or TikTok post promoting your product?

There can be significant variance in what each individual creator may charge, but to provide some more context for your planning, influencer connection platform Intellifluence recently conducted a survey of 1,249 influencers from the US, Canada and the UK, in order to glean more insight into their individual compensation expectations, which could help in your planning.

First off, the researchers asked survey participants what type of compensation they prefer – cash payment, cash and product or just products in return.

Intellifluence influencer marketing costs report

As you can see, ‘Product and Cash’ is clearly the top choice, so if you’re planning your influencer outreach, it’s likely worth honing in on this as your main offering – though again, individual expectations will vary.

In terms of costs per influencer post, Intellifluence has provided overviews based on audience size tiers across all the major platforms, starting with Instagram:

Intellifluence influencer marketing costs report

As per the graph, for smaller-scale influencers (up to 1,000 followers), you’re looking at around $193 per post, on average, while creators with more than 80k followers will generally charge more than $1, 000 per update.

It is also worth noting that audience size should not necessarily be your determining factor, because while larger audiences will drive broader reach and general brand awareness, various reports have also found that those with smaller, more niche followings can often drive better direct response, and better sales outcomes as a result.

There’s no perfect answer here, but if you can find a small influencer with a very active, very engaged following, that can be just as beneficial as someone with a much bigger audience in generating results for your brand – however an endorsement from a major celebrity will always drive greater brand awareness, and likely activity, so they also can’t be dismissed.

You’re just not very likely to get a Kyle Jenner to post about your product – if you can, definitely go for that. But if you can’t, taking a more measured, researched approach will likely deliver the best bang for your budget.

In this sense, these insights may provide some guidance as to how you can map out your spending, and measure your likely ROI, based on expected output.

On Facebook, the pricing per post is slightly lower, on average.

Intellifluence influencer marketing costs report

While Twitter is lower again – which makes sense, given the fast-moving nature of the tweet stream, which likely results in less exposure per tweet.

Intellifluence influencer marketing costs report

For YouTube and TikTok, Intellifluence has split its listings into ‘Peer/Authoritative’ influencers (regular creators who are not celebrities as such) and ‘Aspirational’ stars (higher profile/web celebrity creators).

And the pricing is significantly different between the two categories:

Intellifluence influencer marketing costs report

As you can see, the pricing, despite the category splits, is still largely defined by audience size, with the first category (Peer/Authoritative) covering creators with up to 20k followers, while the second segment covers those with 850k followers or more.

Which is a big jump, but as a comparative measure, these numbers give you some scope of what you can likely expect to be charged to reach these types of audiences on the platform.

The data for TikTok is actually pretty close to YouTube, and really, these two platforms are in their own sphere, separate from the other apps in many respects.

Intellifluence influencer marketing costs report

Of course, these insights are not definitive. 1,200 respondents is a good sample size, which should provide relevant scope for comparison, but there are many, many creators out there, and there’s no set structure, as such, as to what they charge and how much you’ll need to pay to get them to help share your brand messaging.

But it does provide some insight for your planning, and the numbers reflected here are similar to other influencer studies that have been conducted over the past year or so.

If you’re planning an influencer campaign, these estimates are around about what you should be budgeting for, and point to the level of response you likely need to see to offset your costs on the same.

Intellifluence has provided more specific insight in its full, 29-page report, which you can download here.

Socialmediatoday.com

SOCIAL

17 Content Options for Each Stage of the Sales Journey [Infographic]

Published

on

17 Content Options for Each Stage of the Sales Journey [Infographic]

Looking to formulate a better content strategy for 2023?

This will help – the team from Orbit Media has put together a listing of 17 content formats, and where they fit within the sales funnel which could provide some inspiration for your planning.

There are some good pointers here, with specific approaches that you can take at each stage of the journey.

Check out the full listing below – while you can read more on the Orbit Media website.

Source link

Continue Reading

SOCIAL

Meta Soars by Most in Decade, Adding $100 Billion in Value

Published

on

Meta Soars by Most in Decade, Adding $100 Billion in Value

Correction: February 2, 2023 This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: An earlier version of this article misstated how much Meta expected to spend on its deal with the virtual reality start-up Within. It is $400 million, not $400 billion. Meta’s stock surged on Thursday …

Source link

Continue Reading

SOCIAL

Twitter’s Cancelling Free Access to its API, Which Will Shut Down Hundreds of Apps

Published

on

Twitter’s Cancelling Free Access to its API, Which Will Shut Down Hundreds of Apps

Well, this is certainly problematic.

Twitter has announced that, as of February 9th, it’s cutting off free access to its API, which is the access point that many, many apps, bot accounts, and other tools use to function.

That means that a heap of Twitter analytics apps, management tools, schedulers, automated updates – a range of key info and insight options will soon cease to function. Which seems like the sort of thing that, if you were Twitter, you’d want to keep on your app.

But that’s not really how Twitter 2.0 is looking to operate – in a bid to rake in as much revenue as absolutely possible, in any way that it can, Twitter will now look to charge all of these apps and tools. But most, I’d hazard a guess, will simply cease to function.

The bigger business apps already pay for full API access – your Hootsuite’s and your Sprout Social’s – so they’ll likely be unaffected. But it could stop them from offering free plans, which would have a big impact on their business models.

The announcement follows Twitter’s recent API change which cut off a heap of Twitter posting tools, in order, seemingly, to stop users accessing the platform through a third-party UI. 

Now, even more Twitter tools will go extinct, a broad spread of apps and functions that contribute to the real-time ecosystem that Twitter has become. Their loss, if that’s what happens, will have big impacts on overall Twitter activity.

On the other hand, some will see this as another element in Twitter’s crackdown on bots, which Twitter chief Elon Musk has made a personal mission to eradicate. Musk has taken some drastic measures to kill off bots, some of which are having an impact, but Musk himself has also admitted that such efforts are reducing overall platform engagement

This, too, could be a killer in this respect

It’ll also open the door to Twitter competitors, as many automated update apps will switch to other platforms. This relates to things like updates on downtime from video games, weather apps, and more. There are also tools like GIF generators and auto responders – there’s a range of tools that could now look for a new home on Mastodon, or some other Twitter replicant. 

In this respect, it seems like a flawed move, which is also largely ignorant of how the developer community has facilitated Twitter’s growth. 

But Elon and Co. are going to do things their own way, whether outside commentators agree or not – and maybe this is actually a path to gaining new Twitter data customers, and boosting the company’s income. 

But I doubt it.

If there are any third-party Twitter apps that you use, it’ll be worth checking in to see if they’re impacted before next week.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

en_USEnglish