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Sara Ali Khan transforms into a valiant freedom fighter in Ae Watan Mere Watan teaser. Watch

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Prachi Arya

Sara Ali Khan is all set to transform herself into a valiant freedom fighter in the next film Ae Awatan Mere Watan. The upcoming movie directed by Kannan Iyer will release on Amazon Prime Videos.

Mumbai,UPDATED: Jan 23, 2023 11:17 IST

Sara Ali Khan's first look from Ae Awatan Mere Watan unveiled

Sara Ali Khan’s first look from Ae Awatan Mere Watan unveiled

By Prachi Arya: Ahead of India’s 74th Republic Day celebrations, Sara Ali khan shared her first look at the upcoming Amazon Original movie, Ae Watan Mere Watan. The film is an inspiring tribute to the fearless heroes of India’s struggle for freedom. The forthcoming project is helmed by Kannan Iyer and written jointly by Darab Farooqui and Kannan Iyer.

SARA ALI KHAN’S FIRST LOOK FROM AE WATAN MERE WATAN

Sara Ali Khan, who has a lot to offer to fans from her professional plate, surprised fans after she unveiled her first look as a brave freedom fighter in the upcoming film Ae Watan Mere Watan. The movie is a thriller inspired by true events.

The first-look video transports viewers to a bygone era where a tensed yet focused young girl played by Sara expertly assembles a radio-like device in a dimly lit room. Sara Ali Khan, in a never-seen-before, non-glamorous avatar, is sure to impress fans with her impeccable acting chops this time. As she begins to speak on the radio, her voice is imbued with courage and determination; she shares the message of independence with the entire nation via her underground radio station, until she is interrupted by the incessant banging at the door.

Sara Ali Khan, who is extremely delighted and honoured to play such a character, shared her happiness in a press statement and said, “As an actor, and more importantly as an Indian, I am proud to be able to portray a character that echoes bravery, strength, and courage. And while, of course, it is very challenging to essay a character that is vastly different from anything that I’ve done before, it is a project I’m going to work really hard on. And most importantly, I’m going to cherish every day that I get to play an enigmatic freedom fighter.”

ALL ABOUT AE WATAN MERE WATAN

The thriller-drama is inspired by true events and it follows the intrepid journey of a college girl in Bombay who goes on to become a freedom fighter. This fictional tale is set against the backdrop of the Quit India Movement in 1942. It is a story about the courage, patriotism, sacrifice, and resourcefulness of the youth of the nation. The film is bankrolled by Karan Johar and Apoorva Mehta, with Somen Mishra serving as the co-producer.

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Blockchain security startup Hypernative bags $9M to prevent crypto hacks

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Blockchain security startup Hypernative bags $9M to prevent crypto hacks

Hypernative, a cryptocurrency security startup that focuses on protecting against hacks, today said that it has raised $9 million in seed funding to help Web3 companies prevent losses from cyberattacks.

The seed round was led by Boldstart Ventures and IBI Tech Fund, with strategic investments from cryptocurrency firms Blockdaemon, Alchemy, and Nexo, as well as CMT Digital and Borderless and a number of angel investors.

The company created a security platform that uses data both on and off blockchains to predict and prevent potential cyberattacks that target economic, governance and community threats in real time. The company calls its first product the “Pre-Cog” platform because of its ability to capitalize on signals before an attack happens using machine learning models to monitor incoming data.

According to the company, the platform has already detected over 764,000 risks and triggered more than 33,000 alerts on 14,000-plus monitored protocols. It uses its platform to allow its customers to react in real time to potential threats that could affect their crypto assets before or even while an attack might be happening to mitigate any damage that might happen.

“We created Hypernative early last year when we saw huge amounts of money getting stolen or phished or scammed in crypto,” said Gal Sagie, chief executive of Hypernative told Techcrunch. “We saw huge gaps between tools that existed and money being invested, so we wanted to create something to help prevent [attacks].”

According to a report from Immunefi, a bug bounty and security services platform for Web3, the crypto industry lost approximately $3.9 billion due to hacks, fraud and scams in 2022 with cyberattacks representing over 95% of that total. Although many of these attacks could have been prevented by proactively fixing vulnerabilities, it’s not always possible to catch every error or bug in the wild.

This is where Hypernative’s Pre-Cog platform steps in order to warn react and prevent attacks before or as they’re happening. It allows security teams at crypto businesses to receive alerts and act rapidly by exporting the alerts to internal application programming interfaces, Slack, email or Telegram so that engineers can know quickly.

The platform is designed for protocols to enhance security beyond auditing and proactive defense, allowing teams to monitor key metrics and anomalies. For asset managers and traders, it also detects risks in portfolios in advance and real time by identifying potential risks before a transaction is initiated, this means that users can be more confident about their activities. Hypernative is easily integrated into both protocol security controls and trading wallet automated trading systems.

“Until now, there are no systems that not only accurately predict and alert on hacks before they happen but also provide actionable advice to stop them,” said Ed Sim, founding partner at Boldstart Ventures. “The opportunity in front of Hypernative is massive as stopping zero-day attacks will go a long way towards rebuilding trust in the crypto ecosystem.”

Hypernative’s ideal clients include hedge funds, exchanges, asset managers, traders and market managers and anyone who interacts with crypto and blockchain protocols who might end up in a position where they need to react quickly to an attack or any other type of incident.

Photo: Pixabay

Show your support for our mission by joining our Cube Club and Cube Event Community of experts. Join the community that includes Amazon Web Services and Amazon.com CEO Andy Jassy, Dell Technologies founder and CEO Michael Dell, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger and many more luminaries and experts.

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Top 10 Low Risk Tips For Starting Your Own E-commerce Company

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Top 10 Low Risk Tips For Starting Your Own E-commerce Company

Tech layoffs have hit hard. Starting in 2022, major brands including Spotify, Google and Microsoft have been laying off tens of thousands of workers. In the wake of the already tumultuous Covid-19 pandemic and rising inflation, many Americans have been thrust into a state of panic concerning their current and future employment.

The good news is, there are low-risk ways to start your own e-commerce company. For example, in 2021, more than 100,000 new American brands joined Amazon. Amazon’s U.S. selling partners have sold over 3.9 billion products – that equals 7,500 items every minute – and averaged about $200,000 in sales per seller.

“Today, Amazon is a preferred partner for nearly two million selling partners worldwide – most of which are small and medium-sized businesses,” says Claire O’Donnell, director of selling partner empowerment, communities and trust at Amazon. “Our selling partners are incredibly important to us, and we work hard to provide them with effective resources to run and launch successful businesses. We offer a robust suite of tools and services, lending programs, and free educational services like Amazon Small Business Academy and Amazon Seller University to make sure it’s easy for anyone to start selling in Amazon’s store and connect with a global customer base.”

Shan Shan Fu is the founder of Millennials In Motion, an e-commerce brand that sells products on Amazon, Walmart, Shopify, Etsy and Poshmark. She also serves as head of business development at Trivium, an award-winning Amazon advertising and management agency.

Here are Fu’s top 10 tips for starting an e-commerce company with her low-risk, low-investment method:

1. Look for products that have high demand and low competition. Using tools such as Helium 10’s Magnet, you can discover which keywords are being searched on Amazon. Look for products with at least 5,000 monthly searches and less than 1,000 competitors.

2. Create barriers to entry to avoid your product getting copied. Avoid “commodity products,” which are products that anyone can sell. Make your product unique with better features, better design, and/or better functionality. Patent your product, if possible. Work within a particular niche and expand from there.

3. Start with small and light products if you are low in initial cash investment. These products will cost less to ship and less to store than big, heavy, bulky products.

4. If you are on a tight budget, use your smartphone to take pictures and harness apps like GIMP and Canva to edit them. GIMP (similar to Adobe Photoshop) is a free app that allows you to cut out your product and paste it on a white background. Canva is a drag and drop website where you can create beautiful, poster-like images for your product listing pages.

5. Sell your own clothes and belongings on Poshmark in order to get the hang of e-commerce. Honing your skills by selling some of your own goods on Poshmark first will teach you about writing product descriptions, shipping and fulfillment, and customer preferences.

6. Launch on Etsy to test products before expanding your business. For Etsy, you don’t even need a barcode; only images and a product description are required. By testing first, you can save on the cost of launching. The bottom 80 percent of products will not survive.

7. Target your demographic with PickFu. PickFu.com allows you to ask your target demographic if they like your products for only $1 per response. Use it to test photos and product ideas so you don’t waste time or money on a bad product launch.

8. Once you have figured out the top 20 percent winners on Etsy and PickFu, then launch the product on Amazon’s Fulfilled by Amazon (FBA) service. It’s important to launch on Amazon using FBA because this will get you the “Prime” badge, which can significantly increase your sales. Plus, you will no longer have to deal with customer service or order fulfillment, as Amazon will handle it all for you.

9. Invest in Amazon advertising. The pay-per-click platform is a low-cost way to generate sales and increase your organic ranking.

10. Later, you can launch products on Shopify to build your brand and catch sales from influencers. The Shopify app called Shogun allows you to create easy drag-and-drop brand websites. Divert influencer traffic here because Shopify has the lowest fees.

Tracy Sun is the cofounder and SVP of seller experience for Poshmark. She has this to say about Shan Shan Fu. “Our community and their triumphs are the heart of Poshmark and Shan Shan Fu is truly a reflection of that. Her ability to grow her side hustle into a thriving full-time reselling career serves as inspiration to many. Her journey is a testament to the entrepreneurial freedom found through reselling. We are so proud she is a member of the Poshmark community.”

Fu’s parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the 1990s. Although her father was trained as an engineer and her mother as a doctor, they were not able to pursue their professional careers once they arrived in America due to their degrees not being honored. They had to start from scratch. After working in grocery stores for a long time, Fu’s father decided to move to Mexico and start an import/export business. He met with great success. Since then, Fu felt called to follow in his entrepreneurial footsteps.

The greatest challenges of running her own e-commerce business, Fu says, are lack of stability and uncertainty. Also, for women’s clothing, a return rate of 20 to 30 percent is not uncommon. This can eat into your profit margins. You may face cash flow problems when you have to pay for inventory and advertising upfront, even though you may not sell the products until months later. That is why Fu recommends her “low-risk, low investment method.”

That said, Fu loves what she does and, she remarks, when you love what you do, it’s like doubling your lifespan. “Now, instead of enjoying just time after work and on weekends, you enjoy time during work,” she explains.

To people looking to tap into their life purpose by starting their own e-commerce companies, Fu offers this advice. “Self-reflection is the first step. Assess and rank your primary joys and drivers for happiness. When you understand what makes you happy, get ready to overcome your fear of failure, procrastination, and lack of progress by embracing the idea of being uncomfortable. When you are uncomfortable, that means you are successfully pushing yourself forward.”

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Streaming platforms will soon be required to invest more in Australian TV and films, which could be good news for our screen sector

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Streaming platforms will soon be required to invest more in Australian TV and films, which could be good news for our screen sector

Streaming platforms like Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, and Disney+ will soon face regulations to invest in Australian content, as Australian regulations catch up to other world players.

Nearly eight years since the launch of Netflix in Australia in 2015, redressing the “regulatory gap” between unregulated streaming platforms and regulated traditional television is front-of-mind for Arts Minister Tony Burke.

Streaming regulations in Australia

Announced as part of the Labor Party’s new National Cultural Policy, a 6-month consultation period will commence looking at the shape and intensity of new streaming regulations. The implementation deadline for the new streaming regulations will be no later than 1 July, 2024.

The regulation is shaping up as a revenue levy, where a percentage of a streaming platform’s Australian-derived revenues will be required to be spent on local television and films. Existing television regulations in Australia include the transmission quota of 55% local content on commercial free-to-air television, and the 10% expenditure requirement on pay-TV drama content. A revenue levy would be a new policy mechanism in Australia’s television regulation arsenal.

There is a particular urgency to regulating local content on streaming platforms for the government – in 2020-21, Australians for the first time were more likely to watch online video than traditional television. Major American streaming platforms now dominate the viewing landscape, with Netflix a mass service in Australia reaching over 50% of television households.

The government is concerned with the growth of online video that lacks cultural regulation, and fears this, combined with the prominence of American platforms, could contribute to a “drowning out” of Australian voices and stories. Regulating local content on streaming platforms is a way to underpin Australian cultural identity, to ensure Australians will continue to see themselves reflected onscreen, and to support the screen sector with jobs and investment.

Some industry stakeholders like Screen Producers Australia are on record arguing strongly for a high revenue levy of 20%. There are estimates a levy of 20% would result in around $500 million a year alongside 10,000 jobs in the screen sector.

However, some experts have warned such a high levy on local and global platforms could backfire and reduce the competitive edge domestic service Stan might have with Australian content. If every service is required to invest in Australian content, there is less to distinguish Stan’s place in the sector.




Read more:
How local content rules on streamers could seriously backfire


Opposition to the new regulation

Unsurprisingly, the major streaming platforms have previously expressed their opposition to new regulation, believing their current levels of investment in Australia are sufficient. The Australian Communications and Media Authority reported Australian content expenditure from five major platforms at $335.1 million in the 2021-22 financial year.

While lobbying against new regulations, the streaming platforms have also been planning ahead for potential obligations. Amazon’s revival of Neighbours for instance would be a big help towards meeting future Australian content obligations.

The government has not been drawn on what percentage a revenue levy would be set at – that’s what the consultation period is for, they say. Nonetheless, no figure has been ruled out either.

Streaming regulations around the world

Some countries around the world have much more advanced regulatory frameworks than Australia for regulating streaming platforms. There are important lessons to impart from these countries, both in terms of seeing what sort of regulation is possible, but also understanding the pitfalls of potential regulation.

The European Union is widely considered the global leader in the regulation of digital platforms. The EU legislated a 30% catalogue quota for European works on streaming platforms in 2018 under the Audiovisual Media Services Directive, which was intended to come into force in 2021. However, several EU member states were slow in implementing this.

The catalogue quota considers the overall size of a streaming library and requires that 30% of these titles are European. For example, the average Netflix library in major markets was around 5,300 movies and TV shows in 2021, which would result in approximately 1,590 European titles. The catalogue quota uses a broad definition of “European” works which includes a range of countries across Europe beyond the EU itself, such as Turkey and ironically the United Kingdom.

Australia’s focus on a revenue levy on streaming platforms looks more like some of the additional regulations from EU member states legislated under the Audiovisual Media Services Directive. France, which has a history of strong cultural policy and “cultural exception”, has been aggressive in legislating a high revenue levy. The French levy of 20-25% is at the higher end in Europe and is also a country that Screen Producers Australia explicitly referenced when arguing for a 20% levy in Australia.




Read more:
Amazon’s resuscitation of Neighbours: can Aussie TV become good friends with streaming?


The French levy is not without quirks nor criticisms, and was even considered too high by the European Commission. Part of the 20-25% revenue requirement can be satisfied with spending money on generally European content (which again could include UK content), as well as investing in things like restoring archival footage, and subbing and dubbing of content.

The variety of expenditure options are worth keeping in mind when attempting to compare potential regulation in Australia to the French setting. There are a range of other percentages that have been implemented across EU member states – after extensive negotiations in Denmark, the level reached was 6%. The process in Denmark demonstrated some of the challenges that can come during negotiation of new regulation – during a difficult period, Netflix and other services stopped ordering Danish productions entirely in light of what the services saw as over-burdensome proposals.

As well as the importance of debating the intricacies of policy mechanisms for regulating streaming platforms in Australia, the forthcoming consultation period is a vital opportunity to reflect on the cultural dividend Australian content can pay, as well as how much of the raised money should go to drama, children’s, or independent production. So far, Labor has prioritised First Nations stories and perspectives as the first pillar of the National Cultural Policy, which is a worthy goal to consider for streaming and local content regulation.

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