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5 Competitor Analysis Tools You Should Be Using

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5 Competitor Analysis Tools You Should Be Using


It probably feels as if you need tens of marketing tools to get a complete picture of the competitor landscape. I’ve certainly tried too many of them throughout my career.

But the truth is just a few right tools will cover most of your competitor analysis needs. And they don’t need to break the bank. In fact, some of the most powerful ones are free.

In this article, we’ll go through five competitor analysis tools you should be using:

  1. Ahrefs – SEO, PPC, and content marketing
  2. Brand24 – Brand monitoring
  3. SparkToro – Audience insight
  4. BuiltWith – Tech stack checker
  5. Visualping – Webpage monitoring

Let’s get into them.

1. Ahrefs – for SEO, PPC, and content marketing

Most companies consider organic and paid search traffic to be some of their most important traffic sources. Having reliable and insightful data about what your competitors do in this space is crucial—and that’s where Ahrefs comes into play.

Ahrefs provides data about your competitors’ content, backlinks, keywords, PPC ads, and much more. With its help, you can develop an SEO, PPC, and content marketing strategy to outsmart your competition.

My favorite functionality: Finding content gaps between you and your competitors

Ahrefs’ Site Explorer provides an in-depth look at both organic and paid search traffic, including backlinks of any website. There are lots of use cases for competitor analysis, so I’ll just explain my favorite feature: Ahrefs’ Content Gap tool.

It shows keywords for which your competitors rank, but you don’t. These content gaps can quickly give you many new ideas for your content planning.

In Site Explorer, enter your own domain and then click “Content gap.” Your domain will automatically be prefilled in the “But the following target doesn’t rank for” field. All that’s left now is to list a few domains that are your organic traffic competitors:

Text field for competitors. Below that is text field for your domain

Hit “Show keywords”:

List of keywords and corresponding data (volume, KD, CPC, SERP)

You’ll get a huge list of keywords. Now it’s all about playing with the provided filters.

To increase relevance, let’s choose the option where at least two competitor websites rank for every keyword. You can do so by selecting it in the intersection filter. Then filter for the best keyword opportunities by setting a minimal search volume and relatively low maximum KD score:

List of keywords after filters applied

I’m certain you’ll find some great keyword opportunities this way.

Pricing

Free to see technical SEO recommendations and backlinks to the websites you own using Ahrefs Webmaster Tools.

For competitor analysis tools and features, you’ll need a paid plan starting at $82 a month. There’s also a seven-day trial for $7.

Check out Ahrefs here.

2. Brand24 – for brand monitoring

Using social media as a communication channel is a must for the vast majority of companies. But seeing what your competitors do and how their audience perceives them across a huge variety of platforms isn’t something you can easily do by yourself. But no worries. Media monitoring tools, like Brand24, have got this covered.

See also  Re-package Your Best Content for More Exposure (and Links)

Brand24 tracks mentions of keywords that you want to monitor across the whole web with a focus on social media. For competitor analysis, it’s used to identify and analyze online conversations around your competitors’ brands and products.

My favorite functionality: Spying on competitors’ brand mentions

Brand24 revolves around setting up a project with keywords you want to track. These keyword mentions can then be segmented, filtered, and analyzed to gain actionable insights. You’ll definitely want to track your own brand and product mentions. But we’re here to talk about your competitors.

So set up a separate project (or projects) with the name of competitor brands and products. You’ll encounter keywords that also have other meanings. You can either leave them out or apply the required and excluded keyword filters along the way to keep the irrelevant ones out of your reports:

Project settings to add main keyword, add/remove other keywords

This competitor mentions monitoring allows you to:

  • Adjust your communication based on what works best in your industry.
  • Get product insights based on how people react to the development of your competitors’ products.
  • Assess how people perceive your brand and your competitors via sentiment analysis.
  • Benchmark your media reach and share of voice against your competitors.

I’m sure there are even more use cases. Here’s an example of data from a summary dashboard:

Summary data above. Below that are line graphs showing mentions and social media reach, respectively

Pricing

Plans start at $49 a month for tracking three keywords. Tracking your brand and your competitors will require a higher plan for $99 a month that offers seven keywords.

Brand24 also offers a 14-day free trial.

Check out Brand24 here.

3. SparkToro – for audience insights

Doing market research to understand your audience is essential for your marketing success. Chances are, the research also contains competitive analysis data like brand perceptions, estimations of competitors’ marketing funnels, and market shares across segments. Those are all great.

But seeing what the audience of your competitors actually does on the internet is a rather new thing that tools like SparkToro allow us to get in seconds.

SparkToro is an audience research tool that provides information about what any audience reads, watches, listens to, and follows. Those insights can be retrieved based on keywords, social media accounts, websites, or hashtags. Needless to say, all of those inputs can be used to better understand your competitors’ audience.

My favorite functionality: Discovering where competitors’ audience engages

SparkToro is easy to use and navigate. Let’s do an example analysis on the SparkToro audience itself by plugging in its Twitter profile:

Text field to add Twitter profile

It will return a lot of data regarding the demographics of the audience. But in this case, we’ll focus on social media accounts, websites, podcasts, and YouTube channels the audience follows and pays attention to. Here’s an example of a report after filtering for personal social media accounts with fewer than 50K followers:

List of social media accounts with corresponding data (percent of audience, SparkScore, social followers)

With data like this, you can easily spot new advertising and sponsorship opportunities across many different channels. Just put together all the insights by plugging in your competitors’ social profiles, websites, keywords, and any “owned” hashtags.

See also  Google’s 7 Tips For Analyzing a Google Search Traffic Drop

Price

SparkToro is free for five searches a month with limited report capabilities. Paid plans start at $38 a month.

Check out SparkToro here.

4. BuiltWith – for checking tech stacks

Today’s marketing heavily relies on all sorts of tracking codes, pixels, and using the right technologies in the background. Some areas of marketing like SEO are even directly intertwined with website development. Choosing the right tech stack can often be the first step to success.

BuiltWith is a tool that puts together all detectable technologies any website is using, e.g., tracking pixels, payment systems, web servers, and CDNs. You can create a picture of tech stacks your competitors are using. Then either take inspiration from it or choose superior solutions. 

My favorite functionality: Checking advertising technologies

BuiltWith is the easiest and most straightforward tool to use on this list. Just look up websites of your competitors and take notes of any technology that stands out.

For marketing purposes, you can quickly scan all of their detectable marketing technologies. Since most advertising platforms use tracking codes and pixels for remarketing, analytics, and attribution purposes, you’ll see which platforms your competitors are present on.

Finding out that your competitors use Google, Facebook, and Twitter ads isn’t a surprise for anyone, though. But you can find some niche platforms or display networks that may be worth looking into. Here’s an example of what BuiltWith can reveal in its “Analytics and Tracking” section:

List of websites. Below each are links to see stats and download list of websites that use the site

Pricing

BuiltWith is free for the use case I depicted above. I’ve never felt the need to consider its paid plans, which start at $246 a month. Those plans seem to go way beyond the basic functionality and may be worth it for businesses that need a deeper dive into what tech stacks their target audience and prospects use.

Check out BuiltWith here.

5. Visualping – for monitoring webpage changes

Website design and copywriting convey tons of information. They’re also constantly in development, testing, and changing. And whether you admit it or not, every website takes a bit (or a lot) of inspiration from competitors and other websites in the industry. You need to know what’s going on in this area.

Visualping is a tool that keeps track of changes on any webpage. You plug in a competitor’s URL, set up alerts, and will be updated on any website changes.

My favorite functionality: Getting inspired by UX and CRO tweaks on competitors’ websites

I’ve made a lot of decisions based on website monitoring. Generally, the most common use case for any marketer is getting inspired by how your competitors try to squeeze more out of every visitor to their website.

In other words, we’re looking for user experience (UX) and conversion rate optimization (CRO) tweaks that we can adopt on our website without having to do all the research and A/B testing.

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All you need to do is to set up the tracking of your competitors’ websites, and you’ll get alerted whenever there is any noteworthy change. For this use, it’s enough to set up the checking frequency to occur daily or even weekly.

You can also opt in for “any change” or “tiny changes,” as those tweaks can range from small changes in copy to just changing CTA button positions and colors:

On left side is website that you want to track changes. On the right, job settings to tailor preferences

Keep in mind that you shouldn’t blindly copy whatever your competitors do. Those changes may be for the worse. Ideally, the change has to make sense for you, and you should know that the competitor does A/B testing (checking with BuiltWith is a good start).

Pricing

Visualping offers a free plan with up to 65 checks a month, which would probably be enough to cover the homepage, pricing, trial, and other important pages of your competitors on a weekly basis.

If you’re more serious about keeping track of your competitors’ websites, then do try out the paid plans. Those start at $11 a month for 1,200 checks. “Price per page” checks naturally get cheaper as you scale up the monitoring.

Check out Visualping here.

Final thoughts

You may be wondering: “So this is it? Just five tools to get a complete picture of the competitive landscape?”

Well, yes and no.

I only covered the essential tools that everyone can and should use without breaking the bank. I deliberately didn’t list tools that have a niche use (e.g., analyzing YouTube or mobile app landscape). I also avoided “overkill” marketing intelligence platforms like SimilarWeb that provide tons of competitive data but mainly target enterprise and agency customers.

Also, keep in mind the tools I listed here are the ones I have experience with and like the most. Almost every tool has a solid alternative that you may like more.

With this out of the way, I also want to highlight a few more competitive analysis resources (not necessarily tools) that are super helpful and mainly free:

  • Financial reports of public companies to access a goldmine of firsthand information about your competitors
  • Surveys and focus groups to get quantitative and qualitative data about your market and competitors
  • Ghost shopping to get direct customer experiences from your competitors and possibly uncover their sales tactics
  • Review platforms like G2, TrustPilot, Yelp, or Google My Business to check what your competitors’ customers say

So that’s it. If you’re just finding out about the tools and are not sure what is the right way to conduct the competitive analysis, we also have a simple guide (including a template).

Got a tool that I should mention here? Or just a question? Ping me on Twitter.





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Instagram Rolls Out Updates To Live Videos & Remixes

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Instagram Rolls Out Updates To Live Videos & Remixes


Instagram is rolling out updates that will give users a new way to promote their live videos, and more options when it comes to remixing videos.

Adam Mosseri, Head of Instagram, announced these updates while reiterating the company’s focus this year is building on video and messaging.

“We’re focused on building for teens and creators, and in the spaces of video and messaging. And these are within those themes.”

Mosseri first hinted at the new direction Instagram is headed in when he proclaimed last summer: “We’re no longer a photo sharing app.”

Instagram is bringing that vision to life this year starting with two updates that are focused on video — both live video and recorded video.

The updates include:

  • Promoting scheduled lives streams with a new banner
  • The ability to remix any video

Let’s take a look at these enhancements and what they can do for you as a creator.

Highlight Scheduled Live Videos On Your Profile

When you schedule a live video on Instagram, you can now highlight it on your main profile page with a new banner.

Mosseri explains:

“Creators have been able to schedule lives for a while now, but now, you can separate scheduling a live from creating a feed post, or even now a story post, about that live. You also get a little badge on your profile that’s lets followers know, or anybody know that goes to your profile, that there’s a Live coming up and they can subscribe to be reminded.”

You can create as many scheduled live videos as you’d like. This gives you the option to promote a livestream that runs every day at the same time, for example.

See also  Re-package Your Best Content for More Exposure (and Links)

See an example of what the new banner looks like in the screenshot below:

Screenshot from twitter.com/mosseri, January 2022.

People visiting your profile can tap on the banner to create a reminder for your upcoming live video.

Remix Any Video On Instagram

Users now have the ability to remix any video on Instagram.

A “remix” on Instagram means taking videos published by others and responding to or reinventing them with your own video. It’s similar to TikTok’s video reactions.

In fact, when Instagram first rolled out the remix feature, it was basically a copycat of the reaction videos made popular on TikTok.

Previously, users could only remix the TikTok-inspired Instagram Reels.

Now, users can remix any public video on Instagram whether it’s a Reel or a feed post.

Simply tap the three-dot icon that appears in the top right corner and select “Remix this video.”

Instagram Rolls Out Updates To Live Videos & RemixesScreenshot from twitter.com/alexvoica, January 2022.

Remixing is an opt-in feature, so users can pick and choose which videos they want to allow others to remix.

Source: Adam Mosseri on Twitter


Featured Image: Mehaniq/Shutterstock





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Are SEOs Unwilling To Say “I Don’t Know”?

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Are SEOs Unwilling To Say "I Don't Know"?


Martin Splitt, Google’s Developer Advocate, believes SEO professionals are unwilling to admit when they don’t know something, which causes friction with developers.

This topic came up in a discussion during the latest episode of Google’s SEOs & Devs video series.

Splitt is joined by Jenn Mathews, SEO manager at Github, to discuss how SEO professionals and web developers can better understand and communicate with each other.

One of the ways SEOs and developers can improve their working relationship, Splitt suggests, is if SEOs could more readily admit when they don’t know something.

He says it’s common for developers to say “I don’t know” and be open to learning new things through testing.

However, it’s rare hear those words from an SEO professional, Splitt says.

Why is that?

Mathews shares her insight as an SEO manager and enlightens Splitt to the fact that SEO professionals constantly have to be on the defensive.

SEO Professionals Always Have To Defend Their Work

The work of SEO professionals is constantly being questioned, Mathews explains.

This puts them on the defensive, and saying “I don’t know” will only lead to greater scrutiny.

Mathews states:

“SEOs are constantly questioned, so it gets to a point where we almost kind of get on the defensive. When we’re asked a question, or how is this going to work, or if we do this thing what’s the result going to be, it’s hard for us to say ‘I don’t know’ just for that reason. Because we’re constantly under scrutiny or constantly being questioned.

What I usually tell other SEOs is it’s okay to say ‘I don’t know’ because [developers] are going to say ‘I don’t know’ too sometimes.”

Or, if you’re not comfortable with saying “I don’t know,” you could suggest testing things together to see what happens.

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Not only will that approach reduce friction between the SEO and the developer, it will help cover both parties down the road if a launch doesn’t work out as expected.

Mathews continues:

“When we do launch things, and they say ‘how come it’s not working,’ instead of us digging in and trying to understand which algorithm is not letting us rank, it’s okay to say ‘I don’t know’ and ‘let’s try something else and move on.’ But it’s very difficult for SEOs because we are constantly under scrutiny.”

Mathews adds that everyone within an organization scrutinizes the expertise of SEO professionals — from management, to developers, to content writers.

She talks about a time when she was advising a content writer to use a particular keyword so a webpage could rank for that keyword.

Rather than taking her advice, the writer pushed back because they preferred to use a different word. Apparently not understanding the importance of using keywords in copy.

While saying “I don’t know” may lead to a smoother working relationship, it would also help if people within an organization were more trusting of an SEO professional’s expertise.

That’s is just one of many points discussed in Google’s new video, which you can watch below in full:


Featured Image Khosro/Shutterstock





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10 Best Digital Marketing Facebook Groups

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10 Best Digital Marketing Facebook Groups


What makes a good Facebook marketing group?

To find out, I vetted over 35 of them based on the volume of activity in the group, the quality and relevance of the content, and how the admins and members engaged with each other.

Before getting into the list, do remember that many marketing groups require you to answer some simple questions before your request is approved, such as what you hope to get from joining the community.

Here are the 10 best Facebook marketing groups that made the list:

  1. Marketing Solved
  2. SaaS Growth Hacks
  3. CXL — Conversion Optimization, Analytics & Growth
  4. SaaS Products & Marketing
  5. Facebook Ad Hacks
  6. Sisters in SEO
  7. Google SEM Mastermind
  8. Dumb SEO Questions
  9. Local SEO Strategies & Google My Business Help with Tim Kahlert
  10. Superstar SEO

Founder: Kat Sullivan
Group type:
Private
Topics covered: General marketing, social media
Ideal for: Beginners to experienced marketers, founders
Member count:
23.6K
Sign-up link: Facebook

Are you in the social media space? Here’s a community for you to expand your network, grow your social media presence, and learn from some knowledgeable folks.

Founder Kat Sullivan noticed that few Facebook group founders actively engaged with members and sought to fill the gap through Marketing Solved. Its main point of difference is its focus on connecting small-business owners and marketers with useful resources.

From my observations, Kat is generous in sharing her experiences of working with entrepreneurs and brands. She’s also been featured in publications, including Inc., Entrepreneur, and Fast Company—and is the co-founder of social media management tool Tassi.

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Kat's FB post about creating content people search for

In turn, members share a myriad of content, such as interesting marketing case studies, invitations to free marketing courses, and questions on entrepreneurship and monetizing online brands.

Group member's FB post asking for advice on putting together their first online course

As with most marketing groups I came across, self-promotions aren’t allowed unless they are on specific threads. These include Instagram Mondays and Pitch & Promote Your Biz (the latter happens at least once a month).

Founder: Aaron Krall
Group type:
Private
Topics covered: Entrepreneurship, general marketing, conversion rate optimization (CRO), growth hacking 
Ideal for: Mid-level to experienced marketers, founders
Member count:
27.4K
Sign-up link: Facebook

Just like Kat’s Marketing Solved, SaaS Growth Hacks was conceived when founder Aaron Krall noticed the lack of a quality community for SaaS founders.

As a SaaS conversion specialist, he’s helped convert expired trial users into paying customers through email nurture campaigns. Today, the Facebook group is an extension of Aaron’s experiences and includes the founders of established tech companies such as Intercom and AdEspresso.

From what I’ve gleaned, its members are happy to share insights on how to start or scale a SaaS business, as well as improve or build better products.

Group member's FB post asking how many subscriptions are required to sell their SaaS tool for $1 million

Other topics of discussion include growth strategies for email marketing and product launches. Considering this, the group is probably better suited to more experienced marketers.

3. CXL — Conversion Optimization, Analytics & Growth

Founder: Peep Laja 
Group type:
Private
Topics covered: Marketing, CRO, growth hacking
Ideal for: Mid-level to experienced marketers
Member count:
15.1K
Sign-up link: Facebook

Peep Laja is a big believer in evidence-based marketing, and he built growth platform ConversionXL (CXL) on this very premise. His Facebook community is just the same: Members are candid in sharing about their failed experiments and frequently run polls or seek advice on analytics, growth, tag managers, and more.

The bulk of discussions revolve around Google Analytics, CRO audits, Google Search Console, as well as recommended marketing reads. You may also stumble upon posts like this one:

Group member's FB post asking for examples of "high-conversion" landing pages

Given the depth of the conversations, you’re bound to learn something new from the sizable community of CRO-focused marketers. Peep also enforces a no-spam, no-link-dumping rule—something I reckon all of us will appreciate.

4. SaaS Products & Marketing

Founder: Tomer Aharon 
Group type:
Private
Topics covered: Marketing, entrepreneurship, social media
Ideal for: Beginners to experienced marketers
Member count:
15.8K
Sign-up link: Facebook

Run by Tomer Aharon—co-founder of software development platform Premio and SaaS product Poptin—this group helps SaaS founders and digital marketers of all levels share knowledge, ideas, and growth hacks.

I’ve found the community to be a helpful one. There are discussions on lead generation methods for SaaS startups, sharings on B2B marketing outreach tactics, as well as brainstorming threads on marketing outreach.

Group member's FB post asking for advice on reaching out to prospects

While promotional posts are allowed, these must be strictly SaaS-related. You’ll also find freelance and full-time job postings for marketing roles on occasion.

Founder: Catherine Howell
Group type:
Private
Topics covered: Marketing, Facebook ads
Ideal for: Mid-level and experienced marketers, agency owners
Member count:
148.8K
Sign-up link: Facebook

This group is ideal for anyone who’s interested in discussing marketing best practices, social media ad campaigns, and management of client relationships (for agencies). While there are many insightful discussions, these can get fairly technical. Thus, having prior marketing knowledge is probably useful.

Group member's FB post about their "Full Funnel Facebook Ads Strategy" that can help scale e-commerce brands

Founder Catherine Howell, who also helms social media agency Eight Loop Social and has been featured in the likes of Entrepreneur and Inc., is just as active in the community as the members.

For instance, she regularly poses questions or relatable memes.

Catherine's FB post asking members what the hardest thing about running FB ads is

If there’s one drawback of Facebook Ad Hacks, it’s the high volume of activity in the group. There are about 28 posts daily, which means questions tend to get washed down or go unanswered. I ultimately opted to turn off notifications for the group and visit it on occasion when I’m in need of advice or inspiration.

Founders: Kari DePhillipsSamantha Pennington 
Group type:
Private
Topics: Marketing, entrepreneurship, SEO
Ideal for: Beginners to experienced marketers, SEOs
Member count: 10K
Sign-up link: Facebook 

Sisters in SEO began in 2018 to support women, minorities, and gender-diverse folks in the tech space.

Its founding story is interesting too: After attending an SEO course by The Content Factory, Samantha Pennington reached out to agency owner Kari DePhillips. The pair soon found common ground in wanting a safe place to share SEO knowledge—and so set up the Facebook group.

Today, the community remains an inclusive and safe space for members to discuss general and technical SEO, career advice or job openings, and recommended SEO tools.

Group member's FB post sharing there's a job opportunity for freelance SEO content writers

The camaraderie is apparent and reminiscent of Women in Tech SEO’s. I also like that there’s plenty of support and encouragement from members, as well as occasional SEO jokes.

Group member's FB post about a light-hearted SEO joke

Founder: Schieler Mew 
Group type:
Private
Topics:
SEM, local SEO, Google Ads
Ideal for: Mid-level to experienced marketers, SEOs, Google Ads specialists
Member count: 56K
Sign-up link: Facebook

This marketing group is a little more niche, with a myriad of questions on redirects, Google Search Console, improving low click-through rates, and more. And there’s plenty to learn, with active engagement of up to 20 quality posts a day.

Founder Schieler Mew is a passionate SEO himself and has the experience to speak for it. After working as an affiliate marketer for tech majors Uber and Lyft, he turned his focus to local SEO to help small businesses thrive.

Today, he’s the co-founder of ServiceLifter.com, a marketing agency that helps home-service companies grow their online presence.

Schieler’s focus on sharing knowledge with Google SEM Mastermind members is clear. Apart from anecdotes and interesting findings, he runs educational polls to help marketers find further growth. There are also moderators who share interesting takeaways with the growing community.

Mike's FB post about link building tips

Founder: Jim Munro
Group type:
Open
Topics: SEO
Ideal for: Beginners to experienced marketers, SEOs
Member count: 15.2K
Sign-up link: Facebook  

With a name like Dumb SEO Questions, joining this group quashes any potential embarrassment about asking, well, dumb SEO questions. After all, this encourages more open discussions among members.

Expect healthy activity of up to seven posts daily, with discussions centering on technical SEO, Google Analytics, and Google Search Console.

Group member's FB post asking about adding keyword to domain name and the SEO impact of that

Given how open the community is to marketers of all levels, it’s an excellent space to pick up tips from experts while asking “green” questions without fear of being judged. It’s also nice that the page has a strict policy against self-promotions, ensuring that learnings and discussions are streamlined for members.

Founder Jim Munro maintains an active presence in the group too.

Every month, he compiles questions from the group and takes them to SEO experts like David Rosam and Tim Capper via a livestream session on his YouTube channel. The channel is currently on its 426th episode—that’s some real dedication.

9. Local SEO Strategies & Google My Business Help with Tim Kahlert

Founder: Tim Kahlert
Group type:
Private
Topics covered: SEO, entrepreneurship
Ideal for: Entrepreneurs, founders, business owners
Member count:
36.2K
Sign-up link: Facebook

Ready to learn some solid, local SEO strategies? This group may be a good starting point. As an SEO himself, founder Tim Kahlert faced multiple roadblocks when he got banned from several marketing groups for being overly helpful in responding to members’ questions.

In response, he built the Local SEO Strategies community to further his knowledge-sharing, as well as help businesses drive leads and conversions through local marketing strategies.

The community seems better suited to business owners and entrepreneurs who need basic SEO advice, although there are quite a few marketers who weigh in on discussions too. From what I’ve gathered, many questions are to do with Google My Business profiles, local area pages, ranking better in Google Maps, and SEO.

Group member's FB post about finding the right local SEO expert

To ensure the shared content is kept fresh and relevant, the community disallows the cross-sharing of Facebook posts and YouTube videos. That’s something I quite like, having scrolled past my share of unrelated or tired content in other marketing groups.

Founder: Chris M. Walker 
Group type:
Private
Topics covered: SEO, general marketing
Ideal for: Beginners to experienced marketers, SEOs
Member count:
74.8K
Sign-up link: Facebook

Want to get better at SEO? This Facebook group is built on the power of collective knowledge—with the aim of improving lives by building and growing better products and businesses.

That’s according to founder Chris Walker, whose shift to SEO was out of serendipity. After stints in IT and politics, he fell into affiliate marketing before setting up freelance marketplace Legiit and Superstar SEO.

The latter community comprises a healthy mix of SEOs, marketers, and agency owners. And the content is insightful, no matter your level of experience: discussions span technical SEO, portfolio-building tips, toolset recommendations, and then some.

Group member's FB post asking others for a simplified explanation of what SEOs do

Chris, too, poses SEO-related Q&As and occasional livestream sessions—and often receives positive responses from members.

Chris' FB post asking SEOs what else they do for their clients besides getting them their desired ranking on Google

Overall, I like that fellow members are respectful and generous in offering their thoughts. There’s no such thing as a bad question; rather, it’s all about gaining knowledge as a community.

Final thoughts

It’s far more beneficial to join a handful of quality Facebook groups than every group you stumble upon. Observe, engage, and don’t be afraid to be picky. Also, respect the community guidelines and always keep an open mind!

If you want to further expand your network, we’ve got more this way:

Did I miss anything out? Ping me on Twitter with your thoughts and suggestions.





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