Connect with us

SEO

A Sneak Peek Inside With CEO Adrien Menard

Published

on

A Sneak Peek Inside With CEO Adrien Menard

Perhaps you’ve heard of enterprise crawler-turned-end-to-end-SEO-management solution Botify in the past.

But what has the company and its team been up to lately?

And perhaps most importantly for this audience – where are they headed and what are they looking for in new SEO talent to help get them there?

I had a chance to chat recently with Botify’s CEO, Adrien Menard.

Read on for his take on the most pressing challenges and opportunities in enterprise SEO, what’s new with his brand and tool, what Botify is looking for in new SEO hires, and more.

What Are The Greatest Analytics Challenges & Opportunities In Enterprise Right Now?

Adrien Menard: One of the biggest challenges for enterprise organizations is leveraging the massive amounts of raw data available to them efficiently and effectively in order to make sound decisions. This is particularly true for enterprises that maintain large or complex sites.

Any organization today can get more than enough data for a skilled organic-search professional to understand how a few pages are functioning and improve them.

However, it is impossible for humans to manually review this data for thousands of intricately connected pages and derive actionable insights on a daily or weekly basis. That requires powerful data analysis tools and, frankly, machine learning.

But, there is an even greater challenge hidden inside this one. Once you have accurate insight into the performance of your website at the page level, how do you prioritize optimizations?

To be blunt, you don’t want to waste time on pages that have no impact on revenue; nor do you want to work on improving pages that aren’t even being indexed by web crawlers because of some coding error or some algorithm’s decision that the pages aren’t worth crawling.

So, analysis can’t just reduce the mass of raw data to a mass of refined data – or even to a mass of brilliant insights. It has to take the next step.

It has to recognize the revenue value of individual pages, prioritize optimizations based on revenue impact, ensure that the pages are actually being indexed by the web crawlers, and devise optimizations from there.

What Enterprise SEO Challenges Lie Ahead?

Adrien Menard: I believe that organic Search Marketing teams face two kinds of issues within their own organizations.

First, I believe search professionals are having an increasingly difficult time getting their recommendations implemented.

If you have great ideas for optimizations, but you have to take them to an enterprise web team that is already booked out for two or three quarters, or you have to run them through a gauntlet of content reviewers, you may never be able to get optimizations activated.

I’m convinced that a good answer is to bring more automation into the decision process and during the implementation phase.

Second, I think organic-search professionals are under increasing pressure to show results in terms of impact on revenue. This is not uncommon.

Every marketing channel must answer the same question!

With the paid search option getting more competitive, and with serious questions being raised about online privacy, executives are beginning to look at organic search again and ask, “What can you do for my top line?”

Having an answer is not always easy and can require new approaches for search professionals, but it’s now required in any marketing organization.

What One Persistent Problem In Search Would You Wave A Magic Wand And Solve If You Could?

Adrien Menard: As I mentioned before, I think the one problem I would focus on is getting optimizations implemented. This is a two-fold problem.

First is the challenge of figuring out what changes should be activated and getting permission to activate them. And, this is turning increasingly into a problem of relating a proposed optimization to its expected revenue impact.

With limited resources, the only real way to justify touching the site is incremental revenue.

Second, there is the resource issue. There are no underused resources in most web organizations.

If you want to get something changed, you have to have as little impact on others in the organization as possible.

But, if you would allow me, I would add another, longer-range issue: the lack of diversity in the search world. When we think about search engines, most of the time, we think of Google.

It would be far more exciting for organic search professionals – and, really, for users – if there were a broader array of alternatives.

That’s why I like initiatives like You.com and Neeva so much, and why we’re actively supporting Bing.

What’s New At Botify?

Adrien Menard: 2021 was a fantastic year for Botify.

One of the most exciting things for us this year has been to watch Botify Activation – our tool that uses AI to generate and optimize for SEO without any developmental or technical resources – become our fastest-growing product.

I think this reflects what has become the biggest single challenge for organic-search marketing professionals: getting the optimizations they identify implemented.

Botify Activation is a huge help here because it avoids having to get time and resources from other already-overcommitted teams, such as web programmers and page designers.

Another development we are really excited about is more evolutionary.

We are now expanding our customer focus from huge, resource-rich retail and publishing operations to the broad world of enterprises that may have big, complex sites but don’t have huge teams of organic-search experts and web programmers to call upon.

So, we are expanding our organization to reach these new prospects.

In September, we received $55 million USD in Series C funding. This funding enables us to scale and expand more rapidly – in terms of our team, our partners, and our product offering.

Adrien Menard, CEO of Botify 

In November, we announced our expansion into the Asia Pacific region, the largest regional market for organic-search marketing.

We are expanding our collaboration with key brands and partners in the region and actively hiring in Singapore, Sydney, and Tokyo across all departments.

Finally, we are expanding our ecosystem across technology, marketing, and solution partnerships.

We plan to build upon the strong partnerships we’ve already forged and to continue to create alignment, interoperability, and collaboration opportunities with the partners that are essential to our customers’ success.

For 2022, our focus is on automation, data science, and partnerships to deliver stronger ROI to our customers. That means continuing to strengthen Botify Analytics and Botify Intelligence with more AI and machine learning both in their abilities to identify revenue growth opportunities and alert when a regression is happening.

It also means, as we’ve discussed, continuing to develop new automation features in Botify Activation.

We’re also going to broaden and deepen our relationships with our partners.

Partner relationships make it far easier for an organic-search marketing team to adopt our tools and integrate them into their existing working environment.

And that, too, is a facet of turning analysis into incremental revenue and faster and easier implementations.

How Does Botify Use Machine Learning?

Adrien Menard: I think to answer that, we have to ask what machine learning is really good at today.

The answer is that ML really shines at scale. It can’t necessarily solve a single complex problem any better than can a human expert can, but it can make far faster and better decisions regarding tens or hundreds of thousands or millions of pages.

So, we’ve made machine learning and AI integral parts of Botify’s solutions.

Machine learning helps us automate tasks that take weeks or months, shrinking them down to hours. Botify Intelligence and Botify Activation both rely on it.

Botify Intelligence automatically prioritizes action plans using powerful ML and AI models to tell users exactly which optimizations they should focus on and what impact those optimizations will have.

Botify Activation gives organic-search managers the autonomy to implement their projects and helps them do it faster, more easily, and in some cases automatically, without the support of an engineering team.

This enables organizations to save on resources and time and to shift to more strategic initiatives.

AI is today’s must-have feature: Companies are throwing machine learning models at every conceivable problem. But I believe our experience has confirmed that we are on the right track.

The competitive situation our customers face is just getting more formidable, so we are going to continue intensively investing in the ML portions of our tools.

For Botify Intelligence, we will deepen and enrich our models of the relationship between page optimizations and revenue, so we can predict more accurately just what the financial result will be for applying a given optimization.

For Botify Activation, we will continue to develop our models automating the application of optimizations to the customer’s site.

Is Botify Hiring SEO Pros?

Adrien Menard: With our planned expansion in 2022, we expect to be staffing where ever we’re located in Europe, in the United States, Australia, Singapore, and Japan; so, we have a wealth of locations and opportunities open – about 170 in 2022.

The specific positions we are seeking to fill include SEO professionals, software and DevOps engineers, customer success managers, and a range of marketing and sales positions at different levels of seniority.

This is a great opportunity to work for customers with some of the most advanced SEO organizations in the world!

Check out the open roles we have available here.

Any Other Advice For Enterprise Marketers & SEO Pros?

Adrien Menard: If I could leave our audience with one piece of advice, it would be to treasure agility.

Our world is changing at incredible speed: Search volumes are expanding, search terms are shifting daily, and enterprises are continually trying to find the best mix of organic search, paid search, and other tactics.

To be able to recognize shifts in the raw data immediately, interpret those shifts, recognize their implications for the key pages in a huge, complex site, and actually get the needed optimizations activated is an enormous challenge.

It is a challenge we are eager to solve.

More resources:


All images are courtesy of Botify




Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

SEO

Unlocking Brand Growth: Strategies for B2B and E-commerce Marketers

Published

on

Unlocking Brand Growth: Strategies for B2B and E-commerce Marketers

In today’s fast-paced digital landscape, scaling a brand effectively requires more than just an innovative product or service. For B2B and e-commerce marketers, understanding the intricacies of growth strategies across different stages of business development is crucial.  

A recent analysis of 71 brands offers valuable insights into the optimal strategies for startups, scaleups, mature brands, and majority offline businesses. Here’s what we learned. 

Startup Stage: Building the Foundation 

Key Strategy: Startups focus on impressions-driven channels like Paid Social to establish their audience base. This approach is essential for gaining visibility and creating a strong initial footprint in the market. 

Case Study: Pooch & Mutt exemplified this strategy by leveraging Paid Social to achieve significant year-on-year revenue gains while also improving acquisition costs. This foundational step is crucial for setting the stage for future growth and stability. 

Scaleup Stage: Accelerating Conversion 

Key Strategy: For scaleups, having already established an audience, the focus shifts to conversion activities. Increasing spend in impressions-led media helps continue generating demand while maintaining a balance with acquisition costs. 

Case Study: The Essence Vault successfully applied this approach, scaling their Meta presence while minimizing cost increases. This stage emphasizes the importance of efficient spending to maximize conversion rates and sustain growth momentum. 

Mature Stage: Expanding Horizons 

Key Strategy: Mature brands invest in higher funnel activities to avoid market saturation and explore international expansion opportunities. This strategic pivot ensures sustained growth and market diversification. 

Case Study: Represent scaled their efforts on TikTok, enhancing growth and improving Meta efficiency. By expanding their presence in the US, they exemplified how mature brands can navigate saturation and seek new markets for continued success. 

Majority Offline Brands: Embracing Digital Channels 

Key Strategy: Majority offline brands primarily invest in click-based channels like Performance Max. However, the analysis reveals significant opportunities in Paid Social, suggesting a balanced approach for optimal results. 

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

SEO

How To Use The Google Ads Search Terms Report

Published

on

By

How To Use The Google Ads Search Terms Report

One of the most essential aspects of a profitable Google Ads strategy is reaching the right people, with the right message, while they’re searching.

To do this correctly, you need to know exactly how your ads are doing and what words potential customers are using to search.

This is where the Google Ads search terms report comes in handy.

This report is a goldmine and an invaluable asset to every Google Ads account.

With insights into exact phrases being used to trigger your ads, the search terms report can help:

  • Significantly refine your keyword strategy.
  • Enhance your targeting.
  • Boost your return on investment (ROI).

Let’s get into why the Google Ads search terms report is not only helpful but essential for maximizing Google Ads profitability.

What Is The Google Ads Search Terms Report?

The search terms report is a performance tool that shows how your ad performed when triggered by actual searches on the Google Search Network.

The report shows specific terms and phrases that triggered your ad to show, which helps determine if you’re bidding on the right keywords or using the right match types.

If you find search terms that aren’t relevant for your business, you can easily add them to your negative keyword list repository.

This helps you spend your budget more effectively by ensuring your ads are only triggered for relevant, useful searches by potential customers.

Keep in mind that there is a difference between a search term and a keyword:

  • Search term: Shows the exact word or phrase a customer enters on the Google Search Network to trigger an ad.
  • Keyword: The word or phrase that Google Ads advertisers target and bid on to show their ads to customers.

How To Create A Search Terms Report

Creating a search terms report in your Google Ads account is simple, and better yet – it can be automated!

To view your search terms report, you’ll need to:

  • Log into your Google Ads account.
  • Navigate to “Campaigns” >> “Insights & reports” >> “Search terms”

Below is an example of where to navigate in your Google Ads account to find the search terms report.

Screenshot taken by author, April 2024

After running this report, there are multiple actions you can take as a marketer:

  • Add top-performing searches to corresponding ad groups as keywords.
  • Select the desired match type (e.g. broad, phrase, exact) if adding new keywords.
  • Add irrelevant search terms to a negative keyword list.

3 Ways To Use Search Terms Report Data

As mentioned above, there are numerous ways you can use the search terms report data to optimize campaign performance.

Let’s take a look at three examples of how to use this report to get the best bang for your buck.

1. Refine Existing Keyword Lists

The first area the search terms report can help with is refining existing keyword lists.

By combing through the search terms report, you can find areas of opportunities, including:

  • What searches are leading to conversions.
  • What searches are irrelevant to the product or service.
  • What searches have high impressions but low clicks.
  • How searches are being mapped to existing keywords and ad groups.

For searches leading to conversions, it likely makes sense to add those as keywords to an existing ad group or create a new ad group.

If you’re finding some searches to be irrelevant to what you’re selling, it’s best to add them as negative keywords. That prevents your ad from showing up for that search moving forward.

If some searches have a high volume of impressions, but very few clicks, these will take further consideration. If it’s a keyword worth bidding on, it may indicate that the bid strategy isn’t competitive enough – meaning you’ll have to take action on your bid strategy.

If a search term is being triggered by multiple keywords and ad groups, this is a case of cross-pollution of keywords. This can lead to lower ROI because it’s essentially having multiple keywords bid on that search term, which can drive up the cost. If this happens, you have a few options:

  • Review and update existing keyword match types as necessary.
  • Add negative keywords where appropriate at the ad group or campaign level to avoid cross-pollution.

Ultimately, using the search terms report in this way allows you to determine what is performing well and eliminate poor performers.

2. Understand How Your Audience Is Actually Searching For Your Product

Something I often see is a mismatch of how a company talks about its product or service vs. how a customer is actually searching for it in the real world.

If you’re bidding on keywords you think describe your product or service but are not getting any traction, you could be misaligning expectations.

Oftentimes, searches that lead to conversions are from terms you wouldn’t have thought to bid on without looking at the search terms report.

One of this report’s most underutilized use cases is finding lesser-known ways customers are searching for and finding your product.

Finding these types of keywords may result in the creation of a new campaign, especially if the search terms don’t fit existing ad group structures.

Building out campaigns by different search themes allows for appropriate bidding strategies for each because not all keyword values are created equal!

Understanding how a customer is describing their need for a product or service not only helps your keyword strategy but can lead to better-aligned product positioning.

This leads us to a third way the search term report can help your campaigns.

3. Optimize Ad Copy and Landing Pages

As discussed in #2, customers’ language and phrases can provide valuable insights into their needs and preferences.

Marketers can use the search terms report to better tailor ad copy, making it more relevant and appealing to prospective customers.

And let’s not forget about the corresponding landing page!

Once a user clicks on an ad, they expect to see an alignment of what they searched for and what is presented on a website.

Make sure that landing page content is updated regularly to better match the searcher’s intent.

This can result in a better user experience and an improvement in conversion rates.

How Using The Search Terms Report Can Help ROI

All three examples above are ways that the search terms report can improve campaign ROI.

How so?

Let’s take a look at each example further.

How Refining Keywords Helps ROI

Part of refining existing keywords is negating any irrelevant search terms that trigger an ad.

Having a solid negative keyword strategy gets rid of “unwanted” spending on keywords that don’t make sense.

That previously “wasted” spend then gets redirected to campaigns that regularly drive higher ROI.

Additionally, adding top-performing search terms gives you better control from a bid strategy perspective.

Being able to pull the appropriate levers and setting proper bid strategies by search theme ultimately leads to better ROI.

How Understanding Audience Intent Helps ROI

By understanding the exact language and search terms that potential customers use, marketers can update ad copy and landing pages to better match those searches.

This can increase ad relevance and Ad Rank within Google Ads.

These items help with keyword Quality Score, which can help reduce CPCs as your Quality Score increases.

More relevant ads likely lead to higher click-through rates, which leads to a higher likelihood of converting those users!

How Updating Ad Copy And Landing Pages Helps ROI

This example goes hand-in-hand with the above recommendation.

As you start to better understand the audience’s search intent, updating ad copy and landing pages to reflect their search indicates better ad relevance.

Once a user clicks on that relevant ad, they find the content of the landing page matches better to what they’re looking for.

This enhanced relevance can significantly increase the likelihood of conversion, which ultimately boosts ROI.

Use This Report To Make Data-Driven Decisions

Google Ads is an integral part of any digital marketing strategy, often accounting for a large portion of your marketing budget.

By regularly reviewing the search terms report, you can refine your marketing budget to make your Google Ads campaigns more effective.

Using this report to make data-driven decisions that fine-tune multiple facets of campaign management leads to more effective ad spending, higher conversions, and ultimately higher ROI.

More resources: 


Featured Image: FGC/Shutterstock

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

SEO

Google’s Search Algorithm Exposed in Document Leak

Published

on

The Search Algorithm Exposed: Inside Google’s Search API Documents Leak

Google’s search algorithm is, essentially, one of the biggest influencers of what gets found on the internet. It decides who gets to be at the top and enjoy the lion’s share of the traffic, and who gets regulated to the dark corners of the web — a.k.a. the 2nd and so on pages of the search results. 

It’s the most consequential system of our digital world. And how that system works has been largely a mystery for years, but no longer. The Google search document leak, just went public just yesterday, drops thousands of pages of purported ranking algorithm factors onto our laps. 

The Leak

There’s some debate as to whether the documentation was “leaked,” or “discovered.” But what we do know is that the API documentation was (likely accidentally) pushed live on GitHub— where it was then found.

The thousands and thousands of pages in these documents, which appear to come from Google’s internal Content API Warehouse, give us an unprecedented look into how Google search and its ranking algorithms work. 

Fast Facts About the Google Search API Documentation

  • Reported to be the internal documentation for Google Search’s Content Warehouse API.
  • The documentation indicates this information is accurate as of March 2024.
  • 2,596 modules are represented in the API documentation with 14,014 attributes. These are what we might call ranking factors or features, but not all attributes may be considered part of the ranking algorithm. 
  • The documentation did not provide how these ranking factors are weighted. 

And here’s the kicker: several factors found on this document were factors that Google has said, on record, they didn’t track and didn’t include in their algorithms. 

That’s invaluable to the SEO industry, and undoubtedly something that will direct how we do SEO for the foreseeable future.

Is The Document Real? 

Another subject of debate is whether these documents are real. On that point, here’s what we know so far:

  • The documentation was on GitHub and was briefly made public from March to May 2024.
  • The documentation contained links to private GitHub repositories and internal pages — these required specific, Google-credentialed logins to access.
  • The documentation uses similar notation styles, formatting, and process/module/feature names and references seen in public Google API documentation.
  • Ex-Googlers say documentation similar to this exists on almost every Google team, i.e., with explanations and definitions for various API attributes and modules.

No doubt Google will deny this is their work (as of writing they refuse to comment on the leak). But all signs, so far, point to this document being the real deal, though I still caution everyone to take everything you learn from it with a grain of salt.

What We Learnt From The Google Search Document Leak

With over 2,500 technical documents to sift through, the insights we have so far are just the tip of the iceberg. I expect that the community will be analyzing this leak for months (possibly years) to gain more SEO-applicable insights.

Other articles have gotten into the nitty-gritty of it already. But if you’re having a hard time understanding all the technical jargon in those breakdowns, here’s a quick and simple summary of the points of interest identified in the leak so far:

  • Google uses something called “Twiddlers.” These are functions that help rerank a page (think boosting or demotion calculations). 
  • Content can be demoted for reasons such as SERP signals (aka user behavior) indicating dissatisfaction, a link not matching the target site, using exact match domains, product reviews, location, or sexual content.
  • Google uses a variety of measurements related to clicks, including “badClicks”, ”goodClicks”, ”lastLongestClicks” and ”unsquashedClicks”.
  • Google keeps a copy of every version of every page it has ever indexed. However, it only uses the last 20 changes of any given URL when analyzing a page.
  • Google uses a domain authority metric, called “siteAuthority
  • Google uses a system called “NavBoost” that uses click data for evaluating pages.
  • Google has a “sandbox” that websites are segregated to, based on age or lack of trust signals. Indicated by an attribute called “hostAge
  • May be related to the last point, but there is an attribute called “smallPersonalSite” in the documentation. Unclear what this is used for.
  • Google does identify entities on a webpage and can sort, rank, and filter them.
  • So far, the only attributes that can be connected to E-E-A-T are author-related attributes.
  • Google uses Chrome data as part of their page quality scoring, with a module featuring a site-level measure of views from Chrome (“chromeInTotal”)
  • The number, diversity, and source of your backlinks matter a lot, even if PageRank has not been mentioned by Google in years.
  • Title tags being keyword-optimized and matching search queries is important.
  • siteFocusScore” attribute measures how much a site is focused on a given topic. 
  • Publish dates and how frequently a page is updated determines content “freshness” — which is also important. 
  • Font size and text weight for links are things that Google notices. It appears that larger links are more positively received by Google.

Author’s Note: This is not the first time a search engine’s ranking algorithm was leaked. I covered the Yandex hack and how it affects SEO in 2023, and you’ll see plenty of similarities in the ranking factors both search engines use.

Action Points for Your SEO

I did my best to review as much of the “ranking features” that were leaked, as well as the original articles by Rand Fishkin and Mike King. From there, I have some insights I want to share with other SEOs and webmasters out there who want to know how to proceed with their SEO.

Links Matter — Link Value Affected by Several Factors 

Links still matter. Shocking? Not really. It’s something I and other SEOs have been saying, even if link-related guidelines barely show up in Google news and updates nowadays.

Still, we need to emphasize link diversity and relevance in our off-page SEO strategies. 

Some insights from the documentation:

  • PageRank of the referring domain’s homepage (also known as Homepage Trust) affects the value of the link.
  • Indexing tier matters. Regularly updated and accessed content is of the highest tier, and provides more value for your rankings.

If you want your off-page SEO to actually do something for your website, then focus on building links from websites that have authority, and from pages that are either fresh or are otherwise featured in the top tier. 

Some PR might help here — news publications tend to drive the best results because of how well they fulfill these factors.

As for guest posts, there’s no clear indication that these will hurt your site, but I definitely would avoid approaching them as a way to game the system. Instead, be discerning about your outreach and treat it as you would if you were networking for new business partners.

Aim for Successful Clicks 

The fact that clicks are a ranking factor should not be a surprise. Despite what Google’s team says, clicks are the clearest indicator of user behavior and how good a page is at fulfilling their search intent.

Google’s whole deal is providing the answers you want, so why wouldn’t they boost pages that seem to do just that?

The core of your strategy should be creating great user experiences. Great content that provides users with the right answers is how you do that. Aiming for qualified traffic is how you do that. Building a great-looking, functioning website is how you do that.

Go beyond just picking clickbait title tags and meta descriptions, and focus on making sure users get what they need from your website.

Author’s Note: If you haven’t been paying attention to page quality since the concepts of E-E-A-T and the HCU were introduced, now is the time to do so. Here’s my guide to ranking for the HCU to help you get started.

Keep Pages Updated

An interesting click-based measurement is the “last good click.” That being in a module related to indexing signals suggests that content decay can affect your rankings. 

Be vigilant about which pages on your website are not driving the expected amount of clicks for its SERP position. Outdated posts should be audited to ensure content has up-to-date and accurate information to help users in their search journey. 

This should revive those posts and drive clicks, preventing content decay. 

It’s especially important to start on this if you have content pillars on your website that aren’t driving the same traffic as they used to.

Establish Expertise & Authority  

Google does notice the entities on a webpage, which include a bunch of things, but what I want to focus on are those related to your authors.

E-E-A-T as a concept is pretty nebulous — because scoring “expertise” and “authority” of a website and its authors is nebulous. So, a lot of SEOs have been skeptical about it.

However, the presence of an “author” attribute combined with the in-depth mapping of entities in the documentation shows there is some weight to having a well-established author on your website.

So, apply author markups, create an author bio page and archive, and showcase your official profiles on your website to prove your expertise. 

Build Your Domain Authority

After countless Q&As and interviews where statements like “we don’t have anything like domain authority,” and “we don’t have website authority score,” were thrown around, we find there does exist an attribute called “siteAuthority”.

Though we don’t know specifically how this measure is computed, and how it weighs in the overall scoring for your website, we know it does matter to your rankings.

So, what do you need to do to improve site authority? It’s simple — keep following best practices and white-hat SEO, and you should be able to grow your authority within your niche. 

Stick to Your Niche

Speaking of niches — I found the “siteFocusScore” attribute interesting. It appears that building more and more content within a specific topic is considered a positive.

It’s something other SEOs have hypothesized before. After all, the more you write about a topic, the more you must be an authority on that topic, right?

But anyone can write tons of blogs on a given topic nowadays with AI, so how do you stand out (and avoid the risk of sounding artificial and spammy?)

That’s where author entities and link-building come in. I do think that great content should be supplemented by link-building efforts, as a sort of way to show that hey, “I’m an authority with these credentials, and these other people think I’m an authority on the topic as well.”

Key Takeaway

Most of the insights from the Google search document leak are things that SEOs have been working on for months (if not years). However, we now have solid evidence behind a lot of our hunches, providing that our theories are in fact best practices. 

The biggest takeaway I have from this leak: Google relies on user behavior (click data and post-click behavior in particular) to find the best content. Other ranking factors supplement that. Optimize to get users to click on and then stay on your page, and you should see benefits to your rankings.

Could Google remove these ranking factors now that they’ve been leaked? They could, but it’s highly unlikely that they’ll remove vital attributes in the algorithm they’ve spent years building. 

So my advice is to follow these now validated SEO practices and be very critical about any Google statements that follow this leak.

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

Trending