Connect with us

SEO

When Is Paying For Engagement Worth It?

Published

on

When Is Paying For Engagement Worth It?


Before Facebook Ads introduced its ad platform, brands had to rely on growing their social following organically.

In 2022, Facebook (and its sister platform, Instagram) has become a pay-to-play market. You may be struggling to reach a wider audience without paying for visibility via ads.

Whether you’re starting a new company or are a well-established brand, you may need to consider paying for engagement through social platforms.

But how do you know when it’s worth the spend?

New Brands & Facebook Engagement

Every company must start somewhere with social media. If you’re a new brand, you may be under pressure to grow – and quickly.

How do you do that without a following?

You may hope to create viral-worthy content, but relying on this tactic alone for growth is not realistic for most.

Advertisement

We now know that organic engagement for page posts can range anywhere from 0.05% to 0.29%, according to We Are Social. With those abysmally low rates, you’re going to be hard-pressed to get eyes on your social content even with a large following.

So, when is it worth paying for engagement?

A few examples of why you should pay for engagement include:

  • To build a new audience and following quickly.
  • Amplifying content among your existing audience (if any at all).
  • You want to have the ability to create remarketing strategies from Engagement.

If you have the budget available, paying for engagement can be a cost-effective way to gain awareness instead of choosing the “Sales” or “Traffic” objectives.

Is your marketing budget too tight right now? You do have free options available.

Facebook has an “Invite to Follow” feature for pages. This is a free way to get additional page engagement.

The Invite to Follow feature does come with limitations, however.

See also  SiteGround Hosting Outage Over – What Happened via @sejournal, @martinibuster

One of the downsides is that you are only able to invite 200 friends per day. This means you have to choose personal friends to like the page, and they may not be your target audience.

This tactic probably isn’t relevant for brands wanting to reach the national level instead of small-to-medium-sized businesses.

Advertisement

Existing Brands & Facebook Engagement

Think you don’t have to pay for exposure if your brand already has a large following?

Think again.

As mentioned earlier in this article, organic reach to existing followers is minimal. What does that mean?

Your followers that you worked so hard to gain are likely not seeing your content!

For well-established brands, your reasons for paying for engagement may differ from up-and-coming brands. Some of these reasons may include:

  • Expanding your organic reach.
  • Exposing your posts to your audiences’ extended network.
  • Teaching or inspiring your audience.

Facebook users are not looking for sales pitches everywhere they turn. However, this is sadly the case for many individuals.

By focusing less on capturing the end sale of a user, you will already stand out from your competitors.

Showing that you have a consistent presence on social media platforms allows your audience to relate to you. The more users relate to brands, the more loyal they are to them.

Choosing The Engagement Objective

Now that you know why paid Facebook engagement is important, let’s dig into how to set up engagement campaigns.

Advertisement

Facebook has recently simplified its campaign objectives.

If you’re looking to build a following and social media strategy, choosing the “Engagement” objective may be worth it.

Screenshot taken by author, February 2022

Now, the campaign objective is only one piece of the puzzle. What’s more important is the content you are creating and amplifying.

See also  Cracking the code on podcast advertising for customer acquisition

In past experience, video content typically has lower costs per engagement, compared to static images or clickable links.

Why is that?

If you take a step back and think about where you’re reaching users, they are on a social media platform. They are there to engage with content from their friends, family, and brands.

Facebook does not like users to abandon their platform. Typically, standard static content with clickable links does just that – meaning Facebook is going to charge a premium for that type of content.

No wonder your promotional-only posts aren’t working for you!

By focusing on what truly matters to your users, whether it be a useful tip or tool or the mission behind your brand, try to focus on video-form content for the lowest cost per engagement.

Advertisement

Paid Facebook Engagement Strategies

We now know what type of content is the least expensive, so let’s take a look at a few ways to get you the most engagement for your budget.

1. Start With A Broad Audience

You may be prone to target who you think is your target audience right away. Narrowed audiences typically have higher costs associated with them, however.

By starting with a broad audience, you can then narrow down your audience based on the engagement metrics of your ads.

2. Create Remarketing Audiences

The beauty of engagement ads is that you can segment users further based on how they engage with you.

For example, your first campaign is targeting a broad audience with a video ad. From there, you can create remarketing audiences on engagement such as:

  • Percentage of video watched.
  • Likes, comments, shares, saves.
See also  Branded Search vs. Non-Branded Search: What's the Difference?

This engagement tactic will allow you to reach a wide audience at scale, and then reintroduce engaged users to your brand in a cost-effective way.

3. Don’t Use Promotional-Only Posts

If you’re starting with a cold audience, do not spam them with promotional posts.

They don’t know enough about you or your products to want to click on your ads, let alone make a purchase!

Instead, save promotional posts for your loyal customers or a warm remarketing audience.

Advertisement

Additionally, keep promotions to a minimum if you’re able. If your only competitive point is your pricing, you may end up devaluing your brand unintentionally.

Unpaid Engagement Tactics

At some point, your brand will likely dabble into paid engagement ads. However, there are many ways that you can engage with your Facebook audience that does not come in the form of ads.

Some of these non-paid tactics can include:

  • Responding to users in comments or direct messages (DMs).
  • Asking questions in your posts to encourage engagement.
  • Keeping posts short and sweet.
  • Posting interesting, relevant content consistently.

Summary

Social media, particularly Facebook, is now pay-to-play. There’s no getting around that.

The rules behind Facebook organic posting and advertising have changed tenfold from when it was first established.

No matter what stage your brand is in, it’s vital to stay up-to-date on the strategies and tactics that can complement your organic efforts.

Create a paid and organic social media strategy that makes sense for your brand. Create content that is realistic and relatable to your audience.

Most importantly, be consistent in your efforts, and you’ll see the amplified efforts in your long-term brand building.

More Resources:

Advertisement

Featured Image: Sasha Ka/Shutterstock





Source link

Advertisement

SEO

A Complete Google Search Console Guide For SEO Pros

Published

on

A Complete Google Search Console Guide For SEO Pros

Google search console provides data necessary to monitor website performance in search and improve search rankings, information that is exclusively available through Search Console.

This makes it indispensable for online business and publishers that are keen to maximize success.

Taking control of your search presence is easier to do when using the free tools and reports.

What Is Google Search Console?

Google Search Console is a free web service hosted by Google that provides a way for publishers and search marketing professionals to monitor their overall site health and performance relative to Google search.

It offers an overview of metrics related to search performance and user experience to help publishers improve their sites and generate more traffic.

Search Console also provides a way for Google to communicate when it discovers security issues (like hacking vulnerabilities) and if the search quality team has imposed a manual action penalty.

Important features:

  • Monitor indexing and crawling.
  • Identify and fix errors.
  • Overview of search performance.
  • Request indexing of updated pages.
  • Review internal and external links.

It’s not necessary to use Search Console to rank better nor is it a ranking factor.

However, the usefulness of the Search Console makes it indispensable for helping improve search performance and bringing more traffic to a website.

Advertisement

How To Get Started

The first step to using Search Console is to verify site ownership.

Google provides several different ways to accomplish site verification, depending on if you’re verifying a website, a domain, a Google site, or a Blogger-hosted site.

Domains registered with Google domains are automatically verified by adding them to Search Console.

The majority of users will verify their sites using one of four methods:

  1. HTML file upload.
  2. Meta tag
  3. Google Analytics tracking code.
  4. Google Tag Manager.

Some site hosting platforms limit what can be uploaded and require a specific way to verify site owners.

But, that’s becoming less of an issue as many hosted site services have an easy-to-follow verification process, which will be covered below.

How To Verify Site Ownership

There are two standard ways to verify site ownership with a regular website, like a standard WordPress site.

  1. HTML file upload.
  2. Meta tag.

When verifying a site using either of these two methods, you’ll be choosing the URL-prefix properties process.

Let’s stop here and acknowledge that the phrase “URL-prefix properties” means absolutely nothing to anyone but the Googler who came up with that phrase.

Don’t let that make you feel like you’re about to enter a labyrinth blindfolded. Verifying a site with Google is easy.

Advertisement

HTML File Upload Method

Step 1: Go to the Search Console and open the Property Selector dropdown that’s visible in the top left-hand corner on any Search Console page.

Screenshot by author, May 2022

Step 2: In the pop-up labeled Select Property Type, enter the URL of the site then click the Continue button.

Step 2Screenshot by author, May 2022

Step 3: Select the HTML file upload method and download the HTML file.

Step 4: Upload the HTML file to the root of your website.

Root means https://example.com/. So, if the downloaded file is called verification.html, then the uploaded file should be located at https://example.com/verification.html.

Step 5: Finish the verification process by clicking Verify back in the Search Console.

Verification of a standard website with its own domain in website platforms like Wix and Weebly is similar to the above steps, except that you’ll be adding a meta description tag to your Wix site.

Duda has a simple approach that uses a Search Console App that easily verifies the site and gets its users started.

Troubleshooting With GSC

Ranking in search results depends on Google’s ability to crawl and index webpages.

The Search Console URL Inspection Tool warns of any issues with crawling and indexing before it becomes a major problem and pages start dropping from the search results.

Advertisement

URL Inspection Tool

The URL inspection tool shows whether a URL is indexed and is eligible to be shown in a search result.

For each submitted URL a user can:

  • Request indexing for a recently updated webpage.
  • View how Google discovered the webpage (sitemaps and referring internal pages).
  • View the last crawl date for a URL.
  • Check if Google is using a declared canonical URL or is using another one.
  • Check mobile usability status.
  • Check enhancements like breadcrumbs.
See also  How To Premiere A Video On Facebook Live

Coverage

The coverage section shows Discovery (how Google discovered the URL), Crawl (shows whether Google successfully crawled the URL and if not, provides a reason why), and Enhancements (provides the status of structured data).

The coverage section can be reached from the left-hand menu:

CoverageScreenshot by author, May 2022

Coverage Error Reports

While these reports are labeled as errors, it doesn’t necessarily mean that something is wrong. Sometimes it just means that indexing can be improved.

For example, in the following screenshot, Google is showing a 403 Forbidden server response to nearly 6,000 URLs.

The 403 error response means that the server is telling Googlebot that it is forbidden from crawling these URLs.

Coverage report showing 403 server error responsesScreenshot by author, May 2022

The above errors are happening because Googlebot is blocked from crawling the member pages of a web forum.

Every member of the forum has a member page that has a list of their latest posts and other statistics.

The report provides a list of URLs that are generating the error.

Advertisement

Clicking on one of the listed URLs reveals a menu on the right that provides the option to inspect the affected URL.

There’s also a contextual menu to the right of the URL itself in the form of a magnifying glass icon that also provides the option to Inspect URL.

Inspect URLScreenshot by author, May 2022

Clicking on the Inspect URL reveals how the page was discovered.

It also shows the following data points:

  • Last crawl.
  • Crawled as.
  • Crawl allowed?
  • Page fetch (if failed, provides the server error code).
  • Indexing allowed?

There is also information about the canonical used by Google:

  • User-declared canonical.
  • Google-selected canonical.

For the forum website in the above example, the important diagnostic information is located in the Discovery section.

This section tells us which pages are the ones that are showing links to member profiles to Googlebot.

With this information, the publisher can now code a PHP statement that will make the links to the member pages disappear when a search engine bot comes crawling.

Another way to fix the problem is to write a new entry to the robots.txt to stop Google from attempting to crawl these pages.

By making this 403 error go away, we free up crawling resources for Googlebot to index the rest of the website.

Google Search Console’s coverage report makes it possible to diagnose Googlebot crawling issues and fix them.

Advertisement

Fixing 404 Errors

The coverage report can also alert a publisher to 404 and 500 series error responses, as well as communicate that everything is just fine.

A 404 server response is called an error only because the browser or crawler’s request for a webpage was made in error because the page does not exist.

It doesn’t mean that your site is in error.

If another site (or an internal link) links to a page that doesn’t exist, the coverage report will show a 404 response.

Clicking on one of the affected URLs and selecting the Inspect URL tool will reveal what pages (or sitemaps) are referring to the non-existent page.

From there you can decide if the link is broken and needs to be fixed (in the case of an internal link) or redirected to the correct page (in the case of an external link from another website).

Or, it could be that the webpage never existed and whoever is linking to that page made a mistake.

If the page doesn’t exist anymore or it never existed at all, then it’s fine to show a 404 response.

Advertisement

Taking Advantage Of GSC Features

The Performance Report

The top part of the Search Console Performance Report provides multiple insights on how a site performs in search, including in search features like featured snippets.

There are four search types that can be explored in the Performance Report:

  1. Web.
  2. Image.
  3. Video.
  4. News.

Search Console shows the web search type by default.

Change which search type is displayed by clicking the Search Type button:

Default search typeScreenshot by author, May 2022

A menu pop-up will display allowing you to change which kind of search type to view:

Search Types MenuScreenshot by author, May 2022

A useful feature is the ability to compare the performance of two search types within the graph.

Four metrics are prominently displayed at the top of the Performance Report:

  1. Total Clicks.
  2. Total Impressions.
  3. Average CTR (click-through rate).
  4. Average position.
Screenshot of Top Section of the Performance PageScreenshot by author, May 2022

By default, the Total Clicks and Total Impressions metrics are selected.

See also  Branded Search vs. Non-Branded Search: What's the Difference?

By clicking within the tabs dedicated to each metric, one can choose to see those metrics displayed on the bar chart.

Impressions

Impressions are the number of times a website appeared in the search results. As long as a user doesn’t have to click a link to see the URL, it counts as an impression.

Additionally, if a URL is ranked at the bottom of the page and the user doesn’t scroll to that section of the search results, it still counts as an impression.

Advertisement

High impressions are great because it means that Google is showing the site in the search results.

But, the meaning of the impressions metric is made meaningful by the Clicks and the Average Position metrics.

Clicks

The clicks metric shows how often users clicked from the search results to the website. A high number of clicks in addition to a high number of impressions is good.

A low number of clicks and a high number of impressions is less good but not bad. It means that the site may need improvements to gain more traffic.

The clicks metric is more meaningful when considered with the Average CTR and Average Position metrics.

Average CTR

The average CTR is a percentage representing how often users clicked from the search results to the website.

Advertisement

A low CTR means that something needs improvement in order to increase visits from the search results.

A higher CTR means the site is performing well.

This metric gains more meaning when considered together with the Average Position metric.

Average Position

Average Position shows the average position in search results the website tends to appear in.

An average in positions one to 10 is great.

An average position in the twenties (20 – 29) means that the site is appearing on page two or three of the search results. This isn’t too bad. It simply means that the site needs additional work to give it that extra boost into the top 10.

Average positions lower than 30 could (in general) mean that the site may benefit from significant improvements.

Advertisement

Or, it could be that the site ranks for a large number of keyword phrases that rank low and a few very good keywords that rank exceptionally high.

In either case, it may mean taking a closer look at the content. It may be an indication of a content gap on the website, where the content that ranks for certain keywords isn’t strong enough and may need a dedicated page devoted to that keyword phrase to rank better.

All four metrics (Impressions, Clicks, Average CTR, and Average Position), when viewed together, present a meaningful overview of how the website is performing.

The big takeaway about the Performance Report is that it is a starting point for quickly understanding website performance in search.

It’s like a mirror that reflects back how well or poorly the site is doing.

Performance Report Dimensions

Scrolling down to the second part of the Performance page reveals several of what’s called Dimensions of a website’s performance data.

There are six dimensions:

1. Queries: Shows the top search queries and the number of clicks and impressions associated with each keyword phrase.

Advertisement

2. Pages: Shows the top-performing web pages (plus clicks and impressions).

3. Countries: Top countries (plus clicks and impressions).

4. Devices: Shows the top devices, segmented into mobile, desktop, and tablet.

5. Search Appearance: This shows the different kinds of rich results that the site was displayed in. It also tells if Google displayed the site using Web Light results and video results, plus the associated clicks and impressions data. Web Light results are results that are optimized for very slow devices.

6. Dates: The dates tab organizes the clicks and impressions by date. The clicks and impressions can be sorted in descending or ascending order.

Keywords

The keywords are displayed in the Queries as one of the dimensions of the Performance Report (as noted above). The queries report shows the top 1,000 search queries that resulted in traffic.

Of particular interest are the low-performing queries.

Advertisement

Some of those queries display low quantities of traffic because they are rare, what is known as long-tail traffic.

But, others are search queries that result from webpages that could need improvement, perhaps it could be in need of more internal links, or it could be a sign that the keyword phrase deserves its own webpage.

See also  Where To Invest In SEO For Maximum Impact

It’s always a good idea to review the low-performing keywords because some of them may be quick wins that, when the issue is addressed, can result in significantly increased traffic.

Links

Search Console offers a list of all links pointing to the website.

However, it’s important to point out that the links report does not represent links that are helping the site rank.

It simply reports all links pointing to the website.

This means that the list includes links that are not helping the site rank. That explains why the report may show links that have a nofollow link attribute on them.

Advertisement

The Links report is accessible  from the bottom of the left-hand menu:

Links reportScreenshot by author, May 2022

The Links report has two columns: External Links and Internal Links.

External Links are the links from outside the website that points to the website.

Internal Links are links that originate within the website and link to somewhere else within the website.

The External links column has three reports:

  1. Top linked pages.
  2. Top linking sites.
  3. Top linking text.

The Internal Links report lists the Top Linked Pages.

Each report (top linked pages, top linking sites, etc.) has a link to more results that can be clicked to view and expand the report for each type.

For example, the expanded report for Top Linked Pages shows Top Target pages, which are the pages from the site that are linked to the most.

Clicking a URL will change the report to display all the external domains that link to that one page.

The report shows the domain of the external site but not the exact page that links to the site.

Advertisement

Sitemaps

A sitemap is generally an XML file that is a list of URLs that helps search engines discover the webpages and other forms of content on a website.

Sitemaps are especially helpful for large sites, sites that are difficult to crawl if the site has new content added on a frequent basis.

Crawling and indexing are not guaranteed. Things like page quality, overall site quality, and links can have an impact on whether a site is crawled and pages indexed.

Sitemaps simply make it easy for search engines to discover those pages and that’s all.

Creating a sitemap is easy because more are automatically generated by the CMS, plugins, or the website platform where the site is hosted.

Some hosted website platforms generate a sitemap for every site hosted on its service and automatically update the sitemap when the website changes.

Search Console offers a sitemap report and provides a way for publishers to upload a sitemap.

Advertisement

To access this function click on the link located on the left-side menu.

sitemaps

The sitemap section will report on any errors with the sitemap.

Search Console can be used to remove a sitemap from the reports. It’s important to actually remove the sitemap however from the website itself otherwise Google may remember it and visit it again.

Once submitted and processed, the Coverage report will populate a sitemap section that will help troubleshoot any problems associated with URLs submitted through the sitemaps.

Search Console Page Experience Report

The page experience report offers data related to the user experience on the website relative to site speed.

Search Console displays information on Core Web Vitals and Mobile Usability.

This is a good starting place for getting an overall summary of site speed performance.

Rich Result Status Reports

Search Console offers feedback on rich results through the Performance Report. It’s one of the six dimensions listed below the graph that’s displayed at the top of the page, listed as Search Appearance.

Advertisement

Selecting the Search Appearance tabs reveals clicks and impressions data for the different kinds of rich results shown in the search results.

This report communicates how important rich results traffic is to the website and can help pinpoint the reason for specific website traffic trends.

The Search Appearance report can help diagnose issues related to structured data.

For example, a downturn in rich results traffic could be a signal that Google changed structured data requirements and that the structured data needs to be updated.

It’s a starting point for diagnosing a change in rich results traffic patterns.

Search Console Is Good For SEO

In addition to the above benefits of Search Console, publishers and SEOs can also upload link disavow reports, resolve penalties (manual actions), and security events like site hackings, all of which contribute to a better search presence.

It is a valuable service that every web publisher concerned about search visibility should take advantage of.

More Resources:

Advertisement

Featured Image: bunny pixar/Shutterstock



Source link

Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending

en_USEnglish