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Twitter Rolls Out Keyword Search for DMs

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Twitter Rolls Out Keyword Search for DMs


This is a good update.

Today, Twitter has finally launched keyword search for DMs, providing a means to locate specific mentions within any DM text, so you can track down past conversations, products and people mentioned, links shared, etc.

As you can see here, Twitter’s updates DM search options now filter your queries into four segments:

  • All – Which displays all the results for your query, including username and key term matches
  • People – Highlights relevant usernames based on your search term
  • Groups – Shows group chats that use your search term
  • Messages – Which now displays any keyword matches in specific DMs

That’ll make it a lot easier to scan through your DMs, and will provide more functionality for using DMs in a broader range of ways, especially for customer service and chasing up past responses and engagements.

The project has been in the works for over a year, with Debugger reporting last March that Twitter was looking to roll out DM keyword search. Up till now, you’ve only been able to search your DMs by username – which is helpful, but doesn’t give you the full capacity to look up relevant mentions and terms within your private messages.

But now you can, which, as noted, will open up a range of new options, and will make your DMs a more useful, and helpful resource, in a range of ways.

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Twitter has experimented with more advanced DM search features in the past, like searching in a specific DM thread for shared media and links.

But the capacity to search by message content is arguably the most significant development, and it’s good to finally have the functionality available, so we can start experimenting with what we can find.

And again, for brands, improved customer service response is the most obvious benefit. Providing more search tools will help to streamline your DM response – for example, you can now search for all users who’ve asked a question about a product, then provide relevant updates as they come to hand, or you can look up past answers to similar queries, saving you time in response.

There’s a range of ways it could be used – Twitter’s new DM search options are rolling out to all users from today.





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Facebook use plunges among US teens: survey

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Facebook use plunges among US teens: survey

Social media apps. — © AFP

US teens have left Facebook in droves over the past seven years, preferring to spend time at video-sharing venues YouTube and TikTok, according to a Pew Research Center survey data out Wednesday.

TikTok has “emerged as a top social media platform for US teens” while Google-run YouTube “stands out as the most common platform used by teens,” the report’s authors wrote.

Pew’s data comes as Facebook-owner Meta is in a battle with TikTok for social media primacy, trying to keep the maximum number of users as part of its multi-billion dollar ad-driven business.

The report said some 95 percent of the teens surveyed said they use YouTube, compared with 67 percent saying they are TikTok users.

Just 32 percent of teens surveyed said they log on to Facebook — a big drop from the 71 percent who reported being users during a similar survey some seven years ago.

Once the place to be online, Facebook has become seen as a venue for older folks with young drawn to social networks where people express themselves with pictures and video snippets.

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About 62 percent of the teens said they use Instagram, owned by Facebook-parent Meta, while 59 percent said they used Snapchat, researchers stated.

“A quarter of teens who use Snapchat or TikTok say they use these apps almost constantly, and a fifth of teen YouTube users say the same,” the report said.

In a bit of good news for Meta’s business, its photo and video sharing service Instagram was more popular with US teens than it was in the 2014-2015 survey.

Meanwhile, less than a quarter of the teens surveyed said they ever use Twitter, the report said.

The study also confirmed what casual observers may have suspected, 95 percent of US teens say they have smartphones, while nearly as many of them have desktop or laptop computers.

And the share of teens who say they are online almost constantly has nearly doubled to 46 percent when compared to survey results from seven years ago, researchers noted.

The report was based on a survey of 1,316 US teens, ranging in age from 13 years old to 17 years old, conducted from mid-April to early May of this year, according to Pew.

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