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The Cost to Build a WordPress Website

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WPLift.com has been running for many years now. In all that time, the question of how much it costs to build a WordPress website is one that we’ve received more than any other. 

The short answer is that it costs between $30.86 and $1,195 to build a basic WordPress website. 

There’s obviously a huge difference between those two figures, which is why the real, much longer answer, is that it all depends on what type of website you want to create. 

If you’re starting a blog, for example, then that’s probably going to cost you much less than starting an eCommerce store, while launching a basic company website for your new startup will likewise come with its own unique costs involved. 

Sound confusing?

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It doesn’t have to be. In this complete WordPress website cost breakdown, we’ll outline all of the essentials you’re going to need to create any kind of website to help you set an accurate budget for your project. 

How Much Does WordPress Hosting Cost? 

$23 – $86 Per Year

Regardless of whether you’re a blogger, online store owner, or startup, building a successful website of any kind starts with a solid and reliable web hosting package. 

This hosting plan is where you’ll store all of the files that make up your new site so that visitors can access them via their web browser. 

There are countless web hosting companies out there, and, as such, prices can vary dramatically. 

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Siteground is one of our favorite cheap web hosting providers. Their plans start at just $1.99 per month which works out at $23.88 per year. 

At the opposite end of the scale, an entry-level plan from Cloudways will cost $7.20 per month or $86.40 per year.
You can find more options in our guide to the best managed WordPress hosts.

How Much Does a Domain Name Cost?

$6.98 – $10.99+ Per Year

namecheap web hosting

Along with your hosting, you’re also going to need a domain name to direct people to your website. 

Most standard dot-com domain names will cost somewhere between $6 – $12 for the first year.

At Namecheap, for example, you can snap up a domain for 12 months at a cost of $6.98 while domains.com currently charges $10.99 per year

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It’s worth keeping in mind that other Top Level Domains (TLDs) such as .org, .net, and .info are usually priced differently.

Typical costs for common TLDs include: 

  • .Net – $12.99 p/y
  • .Org – $8.99 p/y
  • .Store – $9.99 p/y
  • .Blog – $6.99 p/y
  • .Info – $3.99.

Premium Domains: What You Need to Know

If you search for a domain name and find that the asking price is significantly higher than the $6 – $12 quoted above, there’s a good chance that this is a premium domain. 

Premium domains are those domains that have been purchased by a company or individual domain investor to make a profit from them. These domain names are usually short, catchy, and easy to remember which makes them highly sought-after. Thus, a domain investor can charge hundreds, if not thousands of dollars, to part with it. 

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How to Save Money on Hosting and Domains 

To help you keep your costs down, you may want to look for a web hosting provider that also doubles as a domain registrar. 

Hosting companies like Hostinger and Bluehost offer a free one-year domain registration when you buy a hosting plan from them. 

Though you’ll still have to pay for your domain after that first year is up, this can be a major help if you’re planning to launch your site on a shoestring budget. 

An additional benefit to this is that your domain will automatically be connected to your new website, saving you the time and hassle of configuring name servers manually. 

How Much Does WordPress Actually Cost? 

$0

wordpress install

Now that you’ve got your hosting and domain name set up, it’s time to install WordPress. 

The good news is that since WordPress is open-source software, it doesn’t cost you anything to use. 

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You can download WordPress and install it on your hosting server free of charge. 

Even better, pretty much all major hosting companies come with what’s known as “one-click installation,” which is exactly what it sounds like: 

Execute one click on the WordPress button in your hosting dashboard, and this will launch an installation wizard which takes you through the entire process with no technical ability required on your part. 

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Since this is part of your hosting package, it’s also free of charge. 

How Much Do WordPress Themes Cost? 

$0 – $175

astra wordpress themes cost

On its own, the default WordPress theme is rather basic and uninspiring. This is why the majority of users will shop around to find a theme that suits the type of site they want to create and does a great job of presenting their content in a way that’s attractive to visitors. 

If your budget is tight, you’ll be pleased to know that there are countless free WordPress themes available to use. 

While these themes are typically great for starter sites, most will restrict access to certain features that you can only access if you pay for the upgraded, premium version of that theme. 

To give you an example, Astra is one of the most popular free themes out there and is packed full of quality templates and tools that any novice WordPress user can take advantage of to put together a fantastic website. 

However, many of the theme’s best templates, along with features such as custom background styling and the ability to create custom 404 pages are only available to users who pay between $44 and $175 for one of the Astra Pro plans. 

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If you’re looking for a premium theme that’s a little more affordable, ThemeForest by Envato regularly has professional-grade WordPress themes available for between $30 – $60. 

How Much Does an SSL Certificate for WordPress Cost?

$0 – $117 Per Year

SSL certificate cost for wordpress

An SSL certificate is an essential component of any website as it provides extra security for your visitors, helps to inspire confidence among those visitors, and also appeals to Google’s algorithms which determine where your site ranks in search results. 

Some hosting and domain companies will offer a free SSL certificate. We also put together this guide on the best places to a free SSL certificate

However, free SSL certificates typically only offer a basic level of protection

For greater protection, you may want to invest in buying an SSL certificate. 

Companies such as the aforementioned Namecheap offer premium SSLs from as little as $5.99 per year to $117 per year. 

To help you understand which option is right for you, we put together this complete beginner’s guide to SSL certificates.

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How Much Do WordPress Security Plugins Cost?

$0 – $499 per year

sucuri wordpress security plugins cost

While an SSL certificate can help to protect your site, you’ll also benefit from installing a WordPress security plugin to ensure you have adequate protection against threats such as malware and brute force attacks.  

One of the best tools for this particular task is Sucuri which is available in both free and paid-for versions. 

The free version of Sucuri comes with solid WordPress hardening features, an excellent malware scanner, and tools to get your site back on track if you’ve already been hacked. 

However, it doesn’t offer a firewall. Nor does the free version include other 

useful features such as done-for-you malware removal, and DDoS (Domain Denial of Service) attack prevention.

To access those features, you’ll need to upgrade to one of Sucuri’s premium plans. 

These cost between $199 and $499 per year depending on your requirements. 

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To compare prices with similar tools, take a look at the options included in our list of the best WordPress security plugins

How Much Does it Cost to Start an Online Store with WordPress?

cost to start an online store with wordpress

If you’re planning to use your WordPress site to run an eCommerce business, you’ll need to use WooCommerce. This is a popular plugin that provides all of the basic essentials for an online store such as: 

  • Product pages
  • Shopping cats
  • Checkout pages
  • Flat Rate shipping.

The good news is that this is completely free, so building a basic online store won’t actually cost you anything. 

However, as you’ll read in our ultimate guide to WooCommerce, there are some additional features that you may need. These include: 

Shipping – From  $0 to $99

woocommerce shipping add-ons

The basic WooCommerce plugin allows you to set flat shipping rates as well as offer free shipping or local pickup from a physical location.

However, if your shopping requirements are more complex than that (for example, you want to offer different shipping rates based on location, product size, or order volume), you’ll need to install one of the many WooCommerce shipping add-ons that are available

The WooCommerce Table Rate Shipping add-on allows you to set multiple shipping rates depending on certain conditions. 

This will cost you $99.

You can also access shipping add-ons that connect you directly to services such as USPS and FedEx so that you access the best domestic and international shipping rates for your sold items in real time. 

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These plugins currently cost $47.40 each from the WooCommerce store. 

Payment Gateways – $0 – $30 p/m (plus 2.9% + $0.30c per transaction)

free woocommerce payments add-on

A critical part of any online store is the payment gateway which allows you to collect payments from your customers. 

Here, you have multiple options to choose from, the best of which include: 

WooCommerce payments – $0 

WooCommerce Payments is a free add-on that allows you to accept payments via credit and debit cards.

PayPal – $0 

This free add-on makes it easy to accept PayPal payments. Customers can also be directed to the PayPal website to pay with a credit or debit card. 

PayPal Pro – $30 p/m

If you want to offer customers the most seamless checkout process, directing them away from your site to the PayPal platform may not be ideal. 

In that case, you can upgrade to PayPal Pro which allows you to use PayPal to accept card payments directly from your website. 

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Stripe – $0 

With Stripe for WooCommerce, you can accept payments via debit and credit cards as well as local payments.

Authorize.Net – $25 p/m

Authorize.Net gives you the ability to accept all major payment types for one-off purchases, pre-orders, and subscriptions.

All four of these platforms offer the same transaction fees of 2.9% plus $0.30c per transaction. 

How Much Does it Cost to Add Contact Forms to WordPress?

$0 – $179

cost to add contact forms to wordpress

Whether you’re launching an online store, a blog, or a business website, it’s important that visitors have a way to get in touch with you if they have comments, questions, or complaints. 

The easiest way to do this is to use one of the best WordPress contact form plugins to add a contact form and manage any messages you receive via that form. 

Of all the countless contact form tools out there, WPForms remains among the best of the best. 

For budget-conscious WordPress users, the free version of this plugin, WPForms Lite comes with an intuitive drag-and-drop builder that makes it easy to create basic contact forms and configure options such as what happens after users complete the form (for example, seeing a ‘Thank You’ message or being redirected to another page).

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If you need more than that, prices for WPForms Pro run from $49.50 to $179.70 and include additional features such as: 

  • Subscription forms
  • Payment collection forms and integrations with payment services such as Stripe, Paypal, and Square
  • File uploads
  • Advanced form fields
  • Multi-page forms
  • Surveys 
  • Newsletter forms
  • Integration with top email newsletter plugins such as MailChimp and Sendinblue.

Calculating the Cost of Building a WordPress  Website: A Few Final Things to Consider 

We started this guide by noting that the cost to build a WordPress website can run anywhere from as low as $30.86 to as much as $1,115

If you read everything that followed, we hope you’ve seen how we came to those figures. If not, it really was as simple as calculating all the lowest possible prices we could find (including zero-cost options) and then doing the same thing again with the highest prices. 

The figure that you’re most likely to pay will largely depend on the type of site you’re creating. We should also state that these are the fundamentals. We have not included the cost of content development such as copywriting. However, as this can technically be done by the website owner, we’ve not factored this as a cost.

If you’re planning to launch a simple blog to share your thoughts with the world, for example, you could probably get away with spending $23.88 per year on hosting from Siteground and $6.98 for a dot-com domain name from Namecheap and then relying solely on free themes and plugins to build and manage your site. 

If you’re starting a website to promote your new business, you may want to invest in things like paid security plugins and SSL certificates which will up the cost to between $100 – $300. 

However, if you’re going all out to create an all-singing, all-dancing eCommerce store, you’ll not only want top-level security and eCommerce-optimized web hosting, but you’ll also want to consider shipping and payment gateways too. All told, this could easily push the cost of your WordPress website to the top end of the pricing scale. 
Not that it always has to be so expensive. For ideas on how you can save money when creating your website, check out our detailed guide to the best free WordPress plugins to use for your new site.

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[GET] The7 Website And Ecommerce Builder For WordPress

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The7 website and ecommerce builder for wordpress is the most customizable WordPress, Elementor, and WooCommerce theme available on the market up to …

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Making 43% of the Web More Dynamic with the WordPress Interactivity API – WordPress.com News

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Making 43% of the Web More Dynamic with the WordPress Interactivity API – WordPress.com News

Creating rich, engaging, and interactive website experiences is a simple way to surprise, delight, and attract attention from website readers and users. Dynamic interactivity like instant search, form handling, and client-side “app-like” navigation where elements can persist across routes, all without a full page reload, can make the web a more efficient and interesting place for all.

But creating those experiences on WordPress hasn’t always been the easiest or most straightforward, often requiring complex JavaScript framework setup and maintenance. 

Now, with the Interactivity API, WordPress developers have a standardized way for doing that, all built directly into core. 

The Interactivity API started as an experimental plugin in early 2022, became an official proposal in March 2023, and was finally merged into WordPress core with the release of WordPress 6.5 on April 2, 2024. It provides an easier, standardized way for WordPress developers to create rich, interactive user experiences with their blocks on the front-end.

ELI5: The Interactivity API and the Image Block

Several core WordPress blocks, including the Query Loop, Image, and Search blocks, have already adopted the Interactivity API. The Image block, in particular, is a great way to show off the Interactivity API in action. 

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At its core, the Image blocks allow you to add an image to a post or page. When a user clicks on an image in a post or page, the Interactivity API launches a lightbox showing a high-resolution version of the image.

The rendering of the Image block is handled server-side. The client-side interactivity, handling resizing and opening the lightbox, is now done with the new API that comes bundled with WordPress. You can bind the client-side interactivity simply by adding the wp-on--click directive to the image element, referencing the showLightbox action in view.js.

You might say, “But I could easily do this with some JavaScript!” With the Interactivity API, the code is compact and declarative, and you get the context (local state) to handle the lightbox, resizing, side effects, and all of the other needed work here in the store object.

actions: {
			showLightbox() {
				const ctx = getContext();

				// Bails out if the image has not loaded yet.
				if ( ! ctx.imageRef?.complete ) {
					return;
				}

				// Stores the positons of the scroll to fix it until the overlay is
				// closed.
				state.scrollTopReset = document.documentElement.scrollTop;
				state.scrollLeftReset = document.documentElement.scrollLeft;

				// Moves the information of the expaned image to the state.
				ctx.currentSrc = ctx.imageRef.currentSrc;
				imageRef = ctx.imageRef;
				buttonRef = ctx.buttonRef;
				state.currentImage = ctx;
				state.overlayEnabled = true;

				// Computes the styles of the overlay for the animation.
				callbacks.setOverlayStyles();
			},
...

The lower-level implementation details, like keeping the server and client side in sync, just work; developers no longer need to account for them.

This functionality is possible using vanilla JavaScript, by selecting the element via a query selector, reading data attributes, and manipulating the DOM. But it’s far less elegant, and up until now, there hasn’t been a standardized way in WordPress of handling interactive events like these.

With the Interactivity API, developers have a predictable way to provide interactivity to users on the front-end. You don’t have to worry about lower-level code for adding interactivity; it’s there in WordPress for you to start using today. Batteries are included.

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How is the Interactivity API different from Alpine, React, or Vue?

Prior to merging the Interactivity API into WordPress core, developers would typically reach for a JavaScript framework to add dynamic features to the user-facing parts of their websites. This approach worked just fine, so why was there a need to standardize it?

At its core, the Interactivity API is a lightweight JavaScript library that standardizes the way developers can build interactive HTML elements on WordPress sites.

Mario Santos, a developer on the WordPress core team, wrote in the Interactivity API proposal that, “With a standard, WordPress can absorb the maximum amount of complexity from the developer because it will handle most of what’s needed to create an interactive block.”

The team saw that the gap between what’s possible and what’s practical grew as sites became more complex. The more complex a user experience developers wanted to build, the more blocks needed to interact with each other, and the more difficult it became to build and maintain sites. Developers would spend a lot of time making sure that the client-side and server-side code played nicely together.

For a large open-source project with several contributors, having an agreed-upon standard and native way of providing client-side interactivity speeds up development and greatly improves the developer experience.

Five goals shaped the core development team’s decisions as they built the API: 

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  1. Block-first and PHP-first: Prioritizing blocks for building sites and server side rendering for better SEO and performance. Combining the best for user and developer experience.
  2. Backward-compatible: Ensuring compatibility with both classic and block themes and optionally with other JavaScript frameworks, though it’s advised to use the API as the primary method. It also works with hooks and internationalization.
  3. Declarative and reactive: Using declarative code to define interactions, listening for changes in data, and updating only relevant parts of the DOM accordingly.
  4. Performant: Optimizing runtime performance to deliver a fast and lightweight user experience.
  5. Send less JavaScript: Reduce the overall amount of JavaScript being sent on the page by providing a common framework that blocks can reuse.  So the more that blocks leverage the Interactivity API, the less JavaScript will be sent overall.

Other goals are on the horizon, including improvements to client-side navigation, as you can see in this PR.

Interactivity API vs. Alpine

The Interactivity API shares a few similarities to Alpine—a lightweight JavaScript library that allows developers to build interactions into their web projects, often used in WordPress and Laravel projects.

Similar to Alpine, the Interactivity API uses directives directly in HTML and both play nicely with PHP. Unlike Alpine, the Interactivity API is designed to seamlessly integrate with WordPress and support server-side rendering of its directives.

With the interactivity API, you can easily generate the view from the server in PHP, and then add client-side interactivity. This results in less duplication, and its support in WordPress core will lead to less architectural decisions currently required by developers. 

So while Alpine and the Interactivity API share a broadly similar goal—making it easy for web developers to add interactive elements to a webpage—the Interactivity API is even more plug-and-play for WordPress developers.

Interactivity API vs. React and Vue

Many developers have opted for React when adding interactivity to WordPress sites because, in the modern web development stack, React is the go-to solution for declaratively handling DOM interactivity. This is familiar territory, and we’re used to using React and JSX when adding custom blocks for Gutenberg.

Loading React on the client side can be done, but it leaves you with many decisions: “How should I handle routing? How do I work with the context between PHP and React? What about server-side rendering?”

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Part of the goal in developing the Interactivity API was the need to write as little as little JavaScript as possible, leaving the heavy lifting to PHP, and only shipping JavaScript when necessary.

The core team also saw issues with how these frameworks worked in conjunction with WordPress. Developers can use JavaScript frameworks like React and Vue to render a block on the front-end that they server-rendered in PHP, for example, but this requires logic duplication and risks exposure to issues with WordPress hooks.

For these reasons, among others, the core team preferred Preact—a smaller UI framework that requires less JavaScript to download and execute without sacrificing performance. Think of it like React with fewer calories.

Luis Herranz, a WordPress Core contributor from Automattic, outlines more details on Alpine vs the Interactivity API’s usage of Preact with a thin layer of directives on top of it in this comment on the original proposal.

Preact only loads if the page source contains an interactive block, meaning it is not loaded until it’s needed, aligning with the idea of shipping as little JavaScript as possible (and shipping no JavaScript as a default).

In the original Interactivity API proposal, you can see the run-down and comparison of several frameworks and why Preact was chosen over the others.

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What does the new Interactivity API provide to WordPress developers?

In addition to providing a standardized way to render interactive elements client-side, the Interactivity API also provides developers with directives and a more straightforward way of creating a store object to handle state, side effects, and actions.

Graphic from Proposal: The Interactivity API – A better developer experience in building interactive blocks on WordPress.org

Directives

Directives, a special set of data attributes, allow you to extend HTML markup. You can share data between the server-side-rendered blocks and the client-side, bind values, add click events, and much more. The Interactivity API reference lists all the available directives.

These directives are typically added in the block’s render.php file, and they support all of the WordPress APIs, including actions, filters, and core translation APIs. 

Here’s the render file of a sample block. Notice the click event (data-wp-on--click="actions.toggle"), and how we bind the value of the aria-expanded attributes via directives.

<div
	<?php echo get_block_wrapper_attributes(); ?>
	data-wp-interactive="create-block"
	<?php echo wp_interactivity_data_wp_context( array( 'isOpen' => false ) ); ?>
	data-wp-watch="callbacks.logIsOpen"
>
	<button
		data-wp-on--click="actions.toggle"
		data-wp-bind--aria-expanded="context.isOpen"
		aria-controls="<?php echo esc_attr( $unique_id ); ?>"
	>
		<?php esc_html_e( 'Toggle', 'my-interactive-block' ); ?>
	</button>

	<p
		id="<?php echo esc_attr( $unique_id ); ?>"
		data-wp-bind--hidden="!context.isOpen"
	>
		<?php
			esc_html_e( 'My Interactive Block - hello from an interactive block!', 'my-interactive-block' );
		?>
	</p>
</div>

Do you need to dynamically update an element’s inner text? The Interactivity API allows you to use data-wp-text on an element, just like you can use v-text in Vue.

You can bind a value to a boolean or string using wp-bind– or hook up a click event by using data-wp-on–click on the element. This means you can write PHP and HTML and sprinkle in directives to add interactivity in a declarative way.

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Handling state, side effects, and actions

The second stage of adding interactivity is to create a store, which is usually done in your view.js file. In the store, you’ll have access to the same context as in your render.php file.

In the store object, you define actions responding to user interactions. These actions can update the local context or global state, which then re-renders and updates the connected HTML element. You can also define side effects/callbacks, which are similar to actions, but they respond to state changes instead of direct user actions.

import { store, getContext } from '@wordpress/interactivity';

store( 'create-block', {
	actions: {
		toggle: () => {
			const context = getContext();
			context.isOpen = ! context.isOpen;
		},
	},
	callbacks: {
		logIsOpen: () => {
			const { isOpen } = getContext();
			// Log the value of `isOpen` each time it changes.
			console.log( `Is open: ${ isOpen }` );
		},
	},
} );

Try it out for yourself

The Interactivity API is production-ready and already running on WordPress.com! With any WordPress.com plan, you’ll have access to the core blocks built on top of the Interactivity API. 

If you want to build your own interactive blocks, you can scaffold an interactive block by running the below code in your terminal:

npx @wordpress/create-block@latest my-interactive-block --template @wordpress/create-block-interactive-template 

This will give you an example interactive block, with directives and state handling set up. 

You can then play around with this locally, using wp-env, using a staging site, or by uploading the plugin directly to your site running a plugin-eligible WordPress.com plan

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If you want a seamless experience between your local dev setup and your WordPress.com site, try using it with our new GitHub Deployments feature! Developing custom blocks is the perfect use case for this new tool.

The best way to learn something new is to start building. To kick things off, you may find the following resources a good starting point:


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The Masters Golf Tournament – WordPress.com News

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The Masters Golf Tournament – WordPress.com News

What’s harder: winning the Masters Tournament or re-creating its website in under 30 minutes? Watch the video and find out.

Congratulations are in order for Scottie Scheffler, the winner of the 2024 Masters Tournament in Augusta, Georgia! In today’s Build and Beyond video, Jamie Marsland takes on the slightly less intimidating task of re-creating the Masters website as quickly as he can. Can he possibly do it in just 30 minutes?

Along the way, you’ll learn about sticky navigation menus, image overflows and breakouts, card layouts, and more.

Interested in a free trial that allows you to test our all that WordPress.com has to offer? Click below:


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