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18 Best B2B Website Examples & How to Design a Great B2B Website

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18 Best B2B Website Examples & How to Design a Great B2B Website

The right B2B website makes all the difference when it comes to converting visitors into buyers. In this post, we’ll share the best B2B website examples we’ve ever seen, then dive into three tips for building your site.

By the end, you’ll be able to create a site that drives conversions and keeps buyers coming back. Let’s get started.

With a host of great B2B website examples out there, we’ve curated a list of sites that stand out.

1. Blake Envelopes

b2b website examples: blake envelopes

Are envelopes exciting? Not really, but you wouldn’t know it from the Blake Envelope website. The colors are vibrant, the envelopes are everywhere, and the site manages to convey a sense of movement that makes you want to click through and see exactly what they have to offer. That’s exactly what you want from a B2B website.

2. Pixelgradeb2b website examples: pixelgrade

Pixelgrade makes it clear up front what they’re about: Offering simple WordPress themes to help anyone get their website up and running quickly. There’s no extraneous information here — they state their value proposition and offer a direct link to browse the themes they offer.

3. Reputation Squad

b2b website examples: reputation squad

Reputation management is key to online success for organizations. If companies can’t see what customers are saying about them, they could miss critical opportunities to improve.

Reputation Squad helps companies track their reputation online with a responsive monitoring system. Scrolling through their website gives the feeling they’re operating in the future; backgrounds move and shift as you head down the page and the content is set up in a way that’s easy to view, read, and contextualize.

4. Evernote

b2b website examples: evernote

Evernote isn’t new to the B2B space, but their site continues to make it abundantly clear what they’re good at: Taming your work and organizing your life by making it easy for you to take notes and keep schedules. Even more telling is their aim to help you “remember everything”, which suggests this isn’t just a single-function solution but a multipronged performance tool.

5. Dropbox

b2b website examples: dropbox

The five “S’s” here quickly communicate what Dropbox is all about. Not only can you store and sync files but easily share them and even add eSignatures. That’s it. That’s the value proposition. No fancy graphics, no beating around the bush — just getting straight to the point about how they can help.

6. Shepper

b2b website examples: shepper

Shepper is all about collecting data. And not just any data — the data you tell them you need to collect and analyze. This could be product or advertising information, or data about the overall customer experience. No matter what data you need or where it’s stored worldwide, Shepper can help.

7. HubSpot

b2b website examples: hubspot

We’ll admit it. We’re also pretty great at this B2B stuff. We’re also modest — you’ll notice HubSpot isn’t first on the list — but our site makes it clear what we offer: An easy-to-use CRM than can streamline your current processes and revolutionize the way you work. With both free and premium options, you’re in good hands with HubSpot.

8. Orbital Sidekick

b2b website examples: orbital sidekick

Orbital Sidekick delivers information from space to help government and commercial organizations meet their goals around environmental, social, and governance objectives. Using what’s known as “hyperspectral analysis” from a fleet of satellites, Orbital Sidekick gives companies the data they need to make decisions on-demand.

9. Trello

b2b website examples: trello

Trello is a collaboration tool designed to streamline operations. Given the increasing number of these tools on the market — and the fact that some hinder more than help — Trello makes it clear that no matter where or how teams prefer to work, the solution can help teams move forward.

10. Hootsuite

b2b website examples: hootsuite

Hootsuite’s tagline is simple: “Social is your superpower”. Combined with an image of a woman seemingly taking off into the air and backed by familiar social images and icons, it’s clear right away that Hootsuite is all about helping you get the most of your social media channels.

11. Yapstone

b2b website examples: yapstone

It’s a funny name with a great B2B angle: Local payment for global businesses. Not only does this tagline provide a sense of confidence and familiarity, but also manages to simultaneously suggest that Yapstone can help businesses anywhere power their payment platform.

12. Grammarly

b2b website examples: grammarly

Grammarly cuts right to the chase to showcase what it does best: Detecting and correcting grammar and spelling mistakes. An animated image takes users through a quick demonstration of what Grammarly has to offer, making it clear what users will get when they download and install the app.

13. Acme

b2b website examples: acme

Acme automates industrial warehouse operations. The sepia tones of its website combined with warehouse images and a clear message about what Acme does leave no room for misinterpretation. If you’re their target audience, you’ll click through. If not, you’ll leave.

14. Mailchimp

b2b website examples: mailchimp

Email platform Mailchimp is well-known for its work in marketing emails, and its website makes it clear that the goal of the platform is to grow both business audience and revenues with the help of automated tools and expert advice. With the goal of outperforming your last campaign, it’s a solid pitch for B2B sales.

15. Packlane

b2b website examples: packlane

Consumers don’t just want great products. They want great packaging that is interesting to look at, fun to open, and (ideally) environmentally sustainable. Packlane lets companies create custom packaging and boxes that best suit their products, and provides instant quoting to help companies quickly make a decision.

16. HireLevel

b2b website examples: hirelevel

Aside from making a great pun (higher level — get it?), HireLevel also does a great job of clearly defining what they do. Need a job? They can help. Looking to improve workplace management? They’ve got services to bridge the gap.

17. Netbase Quid

b2b website examples: netbase quid

Netbase Quid is all about consumer and market intelligence. The seven colored tabs on the homepage make it clear exactly how they can help, from tracking brand health to delivering trend analytics to improving crisis management.

18. Square

b2b website examples: square

Square is a payment platform that immediately prompt customers to get started as a first step to entering the site. It’s the first — and nearly only — thing a visitor encounters upon landing on the home page. That information allows Square to offer customers what feels like a much more customized web experience.

1. Make your website about the customer — not about you.

After reviewing hundreds of B2B websites across every major industry, we found only a handful that purposefully invite customers into a conversation. To do that, suppliers need to stop talking so much about themselves.

Rather, they should provide customers with an opportunity to share something about who they are and what they’re looking to do.

Really, it’s no different than common courtesy at a cocktail party. No one wants to be stuck talking to the person droning on about who they are and what they do. Yet that’s precisely what the vast majority of B2B websites do.

Not only is that kind of self-centered approach disengaging, but it also leaves the buyer wondering, “Do they even know who I am? Or what I actually do?” Or worse, “Do they even care?” It’s impersonal at best, and off-putting at worst — fostering questions rather than connections, and distance rather than assistance.

That said, we found a handful of websites that do, in fact, actively invite customers to engage on their terms. One example is vAuto.com. A division of Cox Automotive, vAuto sells enterprise software to auto dealers around world. Among those dealers are both used and new car sellers, along with wholesalers — some franchise-based, and some independent.

b2b website example: vauto

Those distinctions matter — not only for finding the appropriate vAuto solution, but they help to identify how that customer thinks about themselves.

vAuto has designed the front page of its website to allow buyers to self-identify along the dimensions most important to them, prior to going any deeper. The customer’s first choice upon landing at vauto.com is declaring, “I manage new vehicles,” “I manage used vehicles,” “I buy wholesale,” or “I manage reconditioning.”

Notice that even the pronouns are specifically chosen to position the website as a learning and buying tool for customers, rather than a broadcasting tool for the supplier.

Questions to ask yourself:

  • How do our customers define themselves?
  • In their minds, which aspects of their identity most affect the way they look at suppliers like us?

2. Emphasize your customers’ outcomes.

Just as the best websites invite customers into a conversation, they also guide buyers to supplier solutions using the language of customer outcomes — rather than supplier capabilities.

The best companies take the time to understand the specific business objectives customers are seeking to achieve, then organize their sites using language immediately recognizable to customers along those particular outcomes. That way, customers don’t have to translate.

Here’s another place where vAuto excels. The company employs actual customer-articulated business problems as the organizing framework for diving deeper into their broad solution set. It organizes this information around headings like, “Show me how to beat the competition,” and, “Show me to source more profitably.”

At every step, the goal is to make online learning and buying as easy and as resonant as possible — all through an easy-to-follow path of breadcrumbs leading directly to vAuto’s unique solutions.

Questions to ask yourself:

  • What help are customers seeking from a supplier in your category?
  • What specific language would best resonate with your customers to describe that help?

3. Help customers do what they are on your site to do.

Finally, the best websites identify and then facilitate the specific tasks that customers come to your website to complete.

Take something like a cost calculator embedded directly into a website. A tool like that enables customers to independently calculate the costs of (in)action, rather than relying on sales reps to make the case for change. It’s a simple, practical idea, but it’s deployed with single-minded purpose: to allow the buyer to easily progress along the journey, while remaining in her preferred channel of choice.

Questions to ask yourself:

  • What specific buying tasks are your customers coming to your website to complete?
  • How easy is it to find support for those tasks on your site right now?

Building a Better B2B Website

There’s a great deal to be learned from the handful of world-class websites we found. When it comes to building a better B2B site, it’s all about giving buyers an easy entry point, communicating your solutions in language they understand, and making it simple for them to do what they want to do.

Not sure where to get started? Check out the examples above for inspiration and then grab HubSpot’s free ultimate workbook for redesigning your B2B site.

Editor’s note: This post was originally published in January 2018 and has been updated for comprehensiveness.    

Blog - Website Redesign Workbook Guide [List-Based]

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Feds finally file anti-monopoly suit over Google’s adtech

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Feds finally file anti-monopoly suit over Google's adtech

The Department of Justice has filed its long-threatened antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the company of using its adtech to create a monopoly. The suit seeks to force the tech giant get rid of its ad businesses and stop the company from engaging in allegedly anticompetitive practices.

“Having inserted itself into all aspects of the digital advertising marketplace, Google has used anticompetitive, exclusionary, and unlawful means to eliminate or severely diminish any threat to its dominance over digital advertising technologies,” the lawsuit says.

Why we care. Google simultaneously acting as broker, supplier and auctioneer of online ads has always been problematic at best. As Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) put it, “The conflicts of interest are so glaring that one Google employee described Google’s ad business as being like ‘if Goldman or Citibank owned the NYSE.’” Cracking down on monopolistic business practices does great things for the consumer and the economy. The breakup of AT&T in the 1980s is why communication is so inexpensive and widespread today.

In the past, Google has rebutted monopoly claims by pointing to the large number of other companies which facilitate online advertising. The company did not respond to a request for comment today. 

Dig deeper: Google offers adtech unit changes to fend off antitrust lawsuit

This is the fifth antitrust lawsuit filed by state and federal officials against Google since 2020. That year a group of states led by Texas filed an antitrust lawsuit over the company’s advertising technology, while the DOJ and another group of states sued Google over claims that it abused its dominance over online search. In 2021, several states also sued over Google’s app store practices.

Dig deeper: Antitrust bill could force Google, Facebook and Amazon to shutter parts of their ad businesses

Google and other tech giants are currently under pressure from governments around the world trying to restrain their power over online information and commerce. In the European Union, Amazon, Google, Apple and others have faced antitrust investigations and charges, as well as new laws limiting the use and collection of consumer data.


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About the author

Constantine von Hoffman

Constantine von Hoffman is managing editor of MarTech. A veteran journalist, Con has covered business, finance, marketing and tech for CBSNews.com, Brandweek, CMO, and Inc. He has been city editor of the Boston Herald, news producer at NPR, and has written for Harvard Business Review, Boston Magazine, Sierra, and many other publications. He has also been a professional stand-up comedian, given talks at anime and gaming conventions on everything from My Neighbor Totoro to the history of dice and boardgames, and is author of the magical realist novel John Henry the Revelator. He lives in Boston with his wife, Jennifer, and either too many or too few dogs.

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Storytelling: The Secret Sauce to Making More Sales With Email Marketing

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Storytelling: The Secret Sauce to Making More Sales With Email Marketing

Do businesses email their customers too often? According to a recent article on Business Insider, the answer is yes. But not for the reason you may think.

It’s not because customers loathe getting emails from companies. Or because frequent emails are considered spam. It’s actually because most brands nowadays email like this:

They use discounts as their main strategy to persuade customers to buy. But what happens when your customer’s whole inbox looks like the picture above? The inevitable: they stop paying attention to your emails.

Because here’s the thing.

Why would they open your emails if they can already predict the content inside? Why would they buy now when they can clearly see you’ve got discounts all the time? And, most importantly, why would they pick your brand over your competitors?

If you want to stand out in someone’s crowded inbox, you need to do the one thing that everybody else avoids doing: building strong relationships with your email subscribers. Here’s how:

Storytelling is the most effective way to communicate. That’s not me saying it. It’s the countless studies (such as this one, this one, and this one) that prove it, time and time again. Why?

Because storytelling helps you form positive emotional associations with you and your brand. The emotions you evoke with your stories go a long way in defining how people perceive you, creating a stronger connection in your audience’s mind between you and the problem you solve for them. But that’s only the tip of the iceberg. 

The truth is, writing story-based emails makes you more than just a brand that sells a solution to their pain: it makes you an entertainer, too. And as a marketer, being able to entertain while selling is like having a superpower. People hate being sold to. But they love being entertained (ever binge-watched a Netflix show? I know I have). 

Plus, with story-based emails, you can easily add more variability to your email calendar. As a result, customers will no longer be able to predict what your next email will be about: a fun story? A new product? Maybe even a discount? Curiosity translates to increased engagement. And increased engagement translates to stronger relationships with your customers. 

So by choosing the right stories to tell in your emails (which we’ll discuss in a bit) and by writing them in an engaging way, you’re guaranteed to keep your audience hooked and excited to read your next email. As opposed to adding yet another sales email to their already crowded inbox.

1. Pick the Right Story 

The storytelling approach will give you little to no results if the stories you’re telling are flat to begin with. No matter how engaging your writing is. 

So the first thing you need to do is to make sure you select story ideas with potential. Okay, but where do you find these ideas? And what does a good story idea look like?

If you’re anything like me, your life isn’t that exciting or eventful. And yet, you may still have a funny conversation with your next-door neighbor. Or your team may geek out about wild adaptogen mushrooms at a team-building event. Or your spouse may accidentally spill coffee on your laptop (true story!). 

Any of these can be turned into fun story-based emails that tell your audience a little bit more about who you (or your team) are as a person. Most business owners assume their customers don’t want to know what goes on in their personal and business life. But that couldn’t be farther from the truth. 

In fact, customers want to know there are real people behind brand names. According to this report from Sprout Social, 70% of consumers report feeling more connected to a brand when its CEO is active on social media. 

And depending on how much you’re willing to share about your life, you can then select the types of personal stories to write about. When in doubt, think about what you’d want to tell your friends/family at the dinner table. More often than not, that’d make a great story for your email list too.

2. Write a Strong Hook

Let’s face it. 

Nowadays, attention spans are short. And no matter how good your story is, if how you write it isn’t engaging enough, your email subscribers aren’t going to read it. 

So the very first thing you want to do is to make sure the first three sentences of your story hook the reader into the action. Once someone reads that much into a story, it’s incredibly difficult for them to stop. 

So how do you do it? Any of these hooks have proven to work again and again whenever I write stories for myself or my clients:

  • Start in the middle of the action (and explain the context later). For example:

“RUN!”, the police officer yelled at me.

“Okay, thank you!”, I yelled back, running out of Paddington Station and trying to find a cab.

Except, it was 4 in the morning. And I had no idea where to look for one.”

  • Start with ‘x time ago’. Recalling a past event hooks people instantly into your story. For example:

“A few months ago, Joanna Wiebe (the original conversion copywriter) slid into my DMs on Slack completely out of nowhere…”

3. Segue to Your Sales Pitch Seamlessly

By the time you get to this part, your readers are entertained and primed to purchase your solution to their problems. Your brand is no longer just another brand in their busy inbox. It’s someone they now know, trust, and like. And so, buying from you feels just right.

But you can’t just end your story abruptly so you can sell your products/services. That’d feel intrusive. In the same way that, when you’re engaged in a YouTube video, an annoying ad interrupts your stream.

So you must find a way to tie your story to your product or service so seamlessly that your readers won’t even notice they’re now reading a sales pitch. Sounds difficult. But you’ll see how easy it actually is. In fact, what most people get wrong about this part is that they try to find the moral of the story and tie that to their sales pitch. 

For example, let’s say your story is about how your team went to a team-building event and someone accidentally broke a bunch of glasses. And if you’re selling a service, you might be able to spin that incident into saying something like: when you hire our software developers, your app stops breaking.

But that’s a predictable way to transition from your story to your sales pitch. Plus, not all stories will end with a moral. Most stories will be fragments of conversations you have with someone or something ridiculous that happened throughout the day (like forgetting your keys at the office). There’s no moral in that and there’s no need for one.

What you can do instead is to look back at your entire story and find one or a few phrases/words that could help you build that segway. Here’s an example of a full story-based email. Pay special attention to the part where the story ends and the sale begins.

“SUBJ: Hacker threatens to destroy my reputation in 72 hours straight

This morning, I was at my laptop reading my emails when suddenly, I came across an unread email from… 

Me.

What in the world…?

Out of confusion, I open it without reading the subject line. 

And once I go past the first sentence, it becomes pretty clear:

I’m being hacked.

“You may have noticed we are using your company’s servers to send you this email: we have hacked into your website, kaleidocopy[dot]com.”

Oh.

Okay… They did send this email from my email address. 

Still, I can’t help but wonder… could this be a hoax?

“This is not a hoax.”

Ah! Well, that settles it then.

“We are willing to forget about destroying the reputation of your site and company for a small fee. The current fee is at $2500 in bitcoin.”

I mean… at least they are nice about it, you know? Their willingness to forgive and forget says a lot about a person’s character.

In the following lines, they take me through exactly what they’re going to do to ruin my company and reputation, step by step.

Then they teach me how to buy Bitcoin (I already know how, but I appreciate their thoughtfulness!).

And finally, they assure me that my Bitcoin payment will be anonymous and that no one will know that I complied with their master plan.

Mmmmkay. 

GET CERTIFIED. Discover the proven plan for effortless, automated email marketing. Click Here

Now that is a bit suspicious, Mr. Hackerman (or Ms. Hackerwoman — it’s 2022, what the heck.)

I’m willing to bet the $2500 on the fact that I’m not the only person they sent this to.

So if the payment is anonymous, how will they know it was ME who sent it? It just doesn’t make sense, y’know? 

Jokes aside, I’ve got to admit: seeing that the email came from my address made me panic a bit. 

But then I checked my Sent folder and the email wasn’t there.

I also checked to see if there were any alerts or logins from different devices on my Google account. There were none.

I also checked with my hosting provider, who reassured me no one has broken into anything. 

Soooo… hoax? Hopefully, lol. 

But if it isn’t, it means you’ve got 72 hours left to get Email Story Alchemy, my mini-course on turning boring day-to-day events from your life into story-based emails that build your fandom and help you stand out. 

After that, my business will supposedly disappear from the face of the Earth. And you’ll no longer be able to buy it. Everrr.”

Story is a structure, not a tale. Which means that you can apply it to anything, including email. And when you do it right, amazing things happen. 

Like building strong relationships with your customers. And turning a casual customer into a die-hard fan who wants to buy from you because they just can’t get enough of your brand.

Sure, discounts work too. But they work when used strategically and in moderation. So if you’re ever unsure about what to email your customers next, consider story-based emails. They’ll make your brand shine bright in anyone’s crowded inbox.



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What Is Amazon Buy With Prime? [2023 New Integrations and Capabilities]

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What Is Amazon Buy With Prime? [2023 New Integrations and Capabilities]

Ready to grow your DTC store and give customers more of what they want? If so, it’s time to add ‘Buy with Prime’ to your ecommerce site. Launched in April 2022, this Amazon offering allows merchants to easily offer the Prime shopping experience to customers. But how does it work?

In this post, we’ll cover everything you need to know about Buy with Prime including how it works, benefits, getting it on your site, the latest integrations and more. Let’s dive into it.
 

What is Buy with Prime?

 
Buy with Prime allows businesses to grow their online storefront by enabling customers to access the fast, free, and seamless checkout experience Amazon Prime members know and love. This means Buy with Prime is no longer limited to Amazon’s storefront alone. Prime benefits are top-of-the-line and now, these benefits can extend to a wider variety of sites improving customer experience and helping merchants accelerate their business. 

Source: Amazon

 

According to internal Amazon Data, Buy with Prime has been shown to increase shopper conversion by 25%* on average.

 
*This data point measures the average increase in shoppers who placed an order when Buy with Prime was an available purchase option versus when it was not, during the same time period. – Amazon
 

How Does Buy with Prime Work?

 
If you choose to add Buy With Prime to your storefront, when a user is viewing a product on your DTC site, they will now see a ‘Buy with Prime’ logo as well as an option to Buy With Prime (along with existing checkout options). Once the Buy With Prime button is clicked, the user will be prompted to log in to their Amazon account and from there, the checkout menu automatically populates all of the customers’ preferred payment and shipping information from their Amazon account. Buy with Prime makes the shopping experience seamless for both consumers and merchants.

Example of Buy With Prime Site

Source: Amazon

 

“Amazon’s Buy With Prime program brings the Amazon Prime shipping experience and world-class convenience which shoppers have all grown to love to brand sites across the web. Amazon shoppers will be delighted to be able to enjoy the same treatment they are used to on Amazon now being made available across their favorite brand stores.”

 

 
— Pat Petriello, Director, Amazon Strategy at Tinuiti
 

The Benefits of Using Buy with Prime

 
There are a variety of benefits when it comes to the new Buy with Prime feature that you should consider, including:
 

Giving Customers a Familiar Shopping Experience

 
Buy with Prime adds even more value to an Amazon Prime membership. Consumers know, love, and shop on Amazon frequently. By adding the Buy with Prime button to your DTC site, you can give shoppers a sense of familiarity and trust knowing that they will receive fast, free shipping with transparent delivery times as well as free returns on eligible orders. Easily turn Amazon customers into your customers, drive traffic to your site, and convert shoppers quickly with Buy With Prime.
 

“Buy with Prime offers merchants an exciting new way to help improve onsite conversion, while blending the best in what Amazon Prime fulfillment has to offer, with the branding & customer retention strengths that a DTC site can provide.”

 

 
— Josh Brisco, Group Vice President, Acquisition Media at Tinuiti
 

Building Stronger Relationships 

 
With Buy With Prime, sellers will have access to customer order information like names and email addresses which you can utilize to build relationships with your shoppers via customer service, marketing, promotions, etc. (in compliance with privacy policies and applicable law)
 

“For over 20 years, we’ve been empowering small and medium-sized businesses with opportunities to grow. Allowing merchants to offer Prime shopping benefits on their own direct-to-consumer online stores is an exciting next step in our mission to help merchants of all sizes grow their business—whether on Amazon or beyond. With shoppers purchasing directly from merchants’ online stores, Buy with Prime will allow merchants to build customer relationships and brand loyalty while offering conversion-driving benefits like fast, free shipping (Source).”

 
— Peter Larsen, Vice President of Buy with Prime at Amazon
 

Fulfillment Made Easy

 
For sellers utilizing FBA (Fulfilled by Amazon), the setup process is simple considering Amazon can use your inventory (already stored at their fulfillment centers) to complete Buy with Prime orders. To make things even easier, with FBA, Amazon takes care of the storage, delivery, and returns so you can stay focused on driving sales.
 

New Integration with Big Commerce

 
On January 10, BigCommerce announced the Buy with Prime app for BigCommerce. This new self-service integration will help BigCommerce merchants easily enable Buy with Prime on their storefronts—no coding required.

“We’ve been working closely with merchants since launching Buy with Prime, and we’re thrilled to hear that the program has helped drive such impressive results so far. We’ll continue innovating and investing in new features and tools to help merchants of all sizes succeed—and give Prime members the shopping benefits they love, whether it’s on Amazon or beyond.” – Amazon
 

How to Add a Buy with Prime Button to Your Website

 

According to a recent announcement, Buy With Prime is no longer invitation only. The program will be widely available to more U.S.-based merchants by January 31, 2023.

 
FBA merchants can add Buy with Prime to their website in just a few clicks. You can confirm if you are eligible here. Check out the four-step process below.

  • Step 1: Sign up and Create an Account
  • Step 2: Set up Buy With Prime
  • Step 3: Designate Products
  • Step 4: Add Buy with Prime Button

 

Buy With Prime Set Up Steps

Source: Amazon

Hot tip: Make sure you have registered for Amazon Pay to ensure a frictionless checkout experience for buyers.

Buy with Prime is designed to work with most ecommerce providers. And when it comes to cost, Amazon noted, “Using Buy with Prime, merchants simply pay for what they use. Pricing is based on a service fee, a payment processing fee, and fulfillment and storage fees that are calculated per unit. With no fixed subscription fee or long-term contract required, merchants can expand selection or cancel at any time” (Source).

 

Expand Your Reach With Amazon Display Ads

 
When you’re a Buy With Prime merchant, you also have the opportunity to accelerate your business even further by incorporating Amazon Display Ads into your marketing strategy. With Amazon Display Ads, you can drive traffic to your DTC site by remarketing to Amazon audiences on third-party websites. Plus, you’ll have access to exclusive insights and Amazon shopping signals to build audiences so your ads connect with the most relevant consumers. When you partner with a dedicated agency like Tinuiti, you’ll have support to produce your creative assets and manage the ongoing performance of your advertising. 
 

How Buy with Prime Works for Customers

 
Incorporating Buy with Prime into your ecommerce site is a huge win for shoppers as it elevates their shopping experience as a whole. Consumers will just have to look for the Prime logo as they shop at participating merchants’ online stores. From there, they will have access to the fast, free shipping that they’ve grown accustomed to with Amazon Prime. Users can easily complete their order in just a few clicks and will receive order updates just like they would when purchasing directly from Amazon.com. 
 

Interested in Buy With Prime?

 
If you’re interested in adding Buy with Prime to your DTC website, you’ve come to the right place. Tinuiti is proud to be an Amazon Ads Advanced Partner and we have a dedicated team of experts in place to get Buy With Prime up and running on your site. If you’re interested in learning more about this new feature or any of our wide variety of Amazon services, please contact us today.
 
Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in September 2022 and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

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