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9 Creative Company Profile Examples to Inspire You [Templates]

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9 Creative Company Profile Examples to Inspire You [Templates]

What do your customers really know about you?

Do they know that you sell products and have a website? That’s not enough to build a brand identity that resonates with buyers and establishes your brand as the right choice.

In the digital world, an impactful first impression can make you stand out among the enormous amount of content out there. Being memorable is hard, but worth it if you want a brand that will resonate with customers, colleagues, and investors.

People who find you online want to know about your company’s mission, vision, and, of course, how you can help them solve their problems.

How can you make sure that they have all that information at their fingertips? Well, a company profile is the perfect tool for the job.

In this article, we’ll discuss:

A company profile serves multiple purposes , and two of its primary purposes are to attract investors for funding opportunities and to connect with the customers.

Why Company Profiles are Important

Company profiles go a step beyond the standard “about” page. They share how your company got started — and why you continue to serve customers.

Here are some of the reasons why having a company profile is important:

1. A company profile differentiates your brand.

A company profile describes what makes your company unique. It automatically differentiates your brand because no other company has the exact same founding story and reason for existing that your business does. Your history and values are integral parts of your brand positioning strategy, and a company profile is where you can mention this information without it feeling extraneous or out-of-place.

2. A company profile may justify a higher price point.

You can justify a higher price point for your products and services, if you go into details about your production values or ethically-sourced materials.

For instance, Starbucks’ coffee may not be necessarily better than Dunkin’ Donuts’ coffee, but because Starbucks goes into details about its high-quality ingredients, it immediately creates the sense that you’ll be paying a little more for a “better” product.

3. A Company profile builds your reputation.

What do you want your company to be known for?Is your company the one that started as a small family-owned shop then grew into a billion-dollar enterprise? Or is it a company that upholds sustainability and puts ethics at the forefront of its brand? You can build your reputation through marketing, service, and sales campaigns, but it all begins with a well-curated first impression.

Now that you understand the importance of a company profile, it’s time to learn how to write one. Creating a company profile doesn’t have to be nerve-wracking. In fact, it can be straightforward given the right guidance.

Here are 10 steps to guide you on how to write your company profile.

1. State the purpose of the company profile.

This is the most critical part when writing an effective company profile. You want to make sure that the statement aligns with what you’re trying to accomplish. For instance, if your goal is to attract investors, you can include:

  • Your business’s performance
  • The value of the products you sell
  • The company’s revenue

On the other hand, if you want to attract customers, it’s best to add the company values to your profile.

The purpose of a company profile should act as your guide throughout the process, so take your time on it.

2. Decide on the format or style.

How you present your profile significantly affects how successful it is. It’s important that the style offers excellent readability and encourages the audience to engage with it.

This depends on your audience – for example, it’s best to stick to the traditional format for an accounting firm. That is, list the company’s achievements and awards.

On the other hand, if you’re in a fashion or social media marketing firm, it’s advisable to be creative and visual.

Don’t be afraid to experiment or go wild with your ideas as long as they resonate with your target audience.

3. Tell your story & be authentic.

There are probably a million other businesses that sell what you’re selling, but no one else shares your story. Your story is what makes you unique. Don’t just write numbers and dates; let your prospects know who you really are. Be vulnerable and tell them why you started your business.

What inspired you? Share the bad and the good – it doesn’t have to be glamorous. It only has to be authentic.

4. Add your company’s mission statement.

If you don’t have a mission statement, it’s time to craft one. Writing a mission statement for your company isn’t as scary as it sounds, and there is no need to overthink about it. You only need to ask yourself these three questions:

  • Who you serve – this is your target consumer
  • How do you do it – what product or service do you provide to solve their problems?
  • What makes you different – why should your consumers buy from you or trust you over your competitors?

5. Write your company’s history.

This needs to be in chronological order; otherwise, it will confuse your readers. You can do it in a paragraph or a timeline format, as long as it shows a flow.

Another tip to have in mind is that, “less is more”. As tempting as it is to share all your milestones, stick to the major ones to avoid overwhelming the reader.

6. Describe the products and services you offer.

The next step is to describe what your company offers. You can choose a few of your best products or services and give an in-depth description or simply list down everything your business offers.

7. Name the awards your company has received.

If you have received any awards or recognition, add them to your profile and describe them. They showcase your company’s values and give the community a reason to trust you.

8. Add your customer’s testimonials.

Your customers may take everything you say with a grain of salt, but they will believe other customers who have used your products.

This is an excellent way to promote your business without having your products or services come off as hard-sell.

If you’re a B2C business, simply include some of your customer’s best quotes, tied with your best value products. If you’re a B2B business, have a testimonial from the most prominent client on your profile.

9. Include a call to action.

This isn’t mandatory, but it’s a nice touch to your company’s profile. What do you want the readers to do after reading the profile? Visit your branch, check out your website, or call you? Simply include it at the end of your profile. This brings us to our last step.

10. Add your company’s contact information.

This is one of the most critical parts of the company profile. Include all the possible ways your prospects can reach you. This may include but is not limited to; social media profiles, website, phone number, fax, email, and a physical address.

Make sure it’s visible to anyone who reads your company profile.

Company Overview Template

Now that we have gone through all the necessary steps you need to create a company profile, it’s time to put all that into action. Here is a simple company overview template that will help you get started.

Our Story

[Company name] was founded in [Year], and we have accomplished so much over the years. To create a world where [ the solution your business solves] has always been our goal.

Our Founder and CEO [Name] was inspired to start this company by [ one or two sources of inspiration].

At [Company Name], we encourage our community to [ a positive statement related to your brand].

Meet our Team

[Photo] [Name] [Job Title] [Photo] [Name] [Job Title] [Photo] [Name] [Job Title]

Our Mission, Vision & Values

Mission

Our goal is to provide our customers with the best [ service or product] at the best possible market price without compromising quality.

Vision

To be the most reliable [ service or product] provider and enhance [what your product or service does].

Core values

[List your company’s core values]

What Our Customers are Saying

[Insert customer’s testimonials]

Contact Information

Location

Website URL

Social Media Pages

Cell Number

Company Profile Examples

1. Starbucks

Company Profile Examples: Starbucks

Starbucks’ company profile has it all — the company’s mission, background story, products, store atmosphere, and even folklore regarding the name. Best of all, they somehow manage to pull off sounding both genuine and grandiose. I don’t know many other coffee stores that could claim that their mission is “to inspire and nurture the human spirit.”

Starbucks’ company profile is a fantastic example of a store with a common household product, which is coffee. Starbucks managed to stand out from the competition through their mission and values.

2. Wales Bonner

Company profile example: Wales BonnerIf your company has an interesting and intellectual history, you might consider creating a company profile like Wales Bonner’s. The profile reads like an essay from the very first line — “Informed by broad research encompassing critical theory, musical composition, literature and history .WALES BONNER embraces a multiplicity of perspectives, proposing a distinct notion of luxury, via a hybrid of European and Afro-Atlantic approaches.”

After sharing the brand’s intellectual background, it describes the owner’s journey in building the company, starting from the time she was a college student. With a good balance of image and text, the timeline serves as a reminder of Wales Bonner’s stability and growth.

3. Diehl Group Architects

Company profile example: Diehl Group ArchitectsFor both cleanliness and ease-of-use, take a look at Diehl Group Architects’ company profile. The web page uses clickable boxes to separate topics, allowing users to choose which subject they’d like to learn more about. Additionally, the entire design — including the page’s background, which displays a floor-plan — mirrors the company’s purpose.

4. Bloomberg

Company profile example: Bloomberg

Nearly nine out of ten people report wanting to see more videos from brands, so you might consider using a compelling video to convey your company’s story, like Bloomberg does in their company profile.

Bloomberg’s profile proves the company knows its audience, because they offer a few quick statistics, and then link to other areas of the site, such as Careers and Tech. While other businesses might do well in offering a creative, long-form story, Bloomberg’s typical demographic is likely more analytical.

5. Nike

Company profile example: NikeYou can get a sense of Nike’s two primary purposes almost instantly — fitness and people. When you first open their company profile, you’re greeted with videos of people of different ages, gender, and nationalities playing sports.

Additionally, their initial introduction is this: “Bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete* in the world.” The asterisk implies, “If you have a body, you are an athlete.” As you scroll, you’ll see information on their internal diversity and inclusion initiative, their global community impact, and their sustainable business program, with very little mention of their products.

Nike’s company profile portrays a larger, grander vision, compelling an audience to believe in their brand even before they purchase a product.

6. Seattle Cider

Company profile example: Seattle CiderSeattle Cider Company’s profile is minimal and engages the user through compelling animations that demonstrate the company’s cider selection. The page flows seamlessly, and provides critical information regarding the product before displaying the company’s mission and values. This profile is a good example of a company that understands its users’ concerns (in this case, quality ingredients), and addresses those issues while still displaying personality and flair.

7. Delta

Company profile example: Delta

Delta’s page is well-organized by topic, and showcases the company’s values, including efforts to engage with the community and promote sustainability. They’ve included brief meta-descriptions below each category. The design allows for users to click-through if they want to learn more. Overall, Delta’s company profile is simple and uncluttered, but includes all the necessary information to demonstrate why Delta is unique.

8. Roam Loud

Company profile example: Roam LoudDo you have a personal story behind your company’s founding? Roam Loud’s example is the one you may just want to copy or get inspiration from. The brand’s company profile is simple yet effective, starting with a friendly greeting “Hey there!” and ending with a list of values. In between, the founder makes it clear why she created this brand, and why its existence is so important to her and prospective buyers.

9. MAD Architects

Company profile example: MAD ArchitectsFor simplicity and informativeness, take a look at MAD Architects’ company profile. The profile isn’t shy about the firm’s numerous accomplishments, and it gives readers the opportunity to dive deeper by listing the firm’s exhibitions, lectures, awards, and publications, all visible on different tabs within the same page. If your business is a leader in its field, it’s important to establish that in your company profile. Consider creating one similar to MAD Architects’ profile.

With this in mind, the description serves to align with the prospect as they are evaluating which providers are right for them. By leaning into a strong brand voice and providing details about what makes your company unique or superior to the prospect’s alternatives, customers will believe in your brand and want to do business with you.

Examples of Company Descriptions

Here are some examples of company descriptions that enhance their organizations’ company profile.

1. HubSpot

Company description example: HubSpotOn HubSpot’s company profile page, you can find a quick description of the company’s mission and what it does. In just a few words, HubSpot explains that the company’s goal is to help businesses grow through its specialized inbound software.

2. Landed, Inc.

landed inc company description

Landed, Inc. ‘s About Us page starts with their vision statement: “If we want stronger schools and safer communities, we need to support those who make it possible.” From there, they talk about their history before launching into their mission statement and company description. The latter is summarized succinctly in bullet points in its own separate section, making it easy for prospects to find and understand.

3. H&H Wealth

example company description: h&h wealth In the “Why Us” page of their website, the founder of H&H Wealth gives a brief introduction of what she believes in and encourages her customers to walk the journey with her. She also makes a promise to her clients, which sets the expectations and the tone for the service being delivered. As a result, the tone comes across as that of a partner rather than a vendor.

4. Tesla

example company description: Tesla

In this description, Tesla explains when it was founded, the company mission, and what types of products it specializes in. It also provides added information about the history of the company and how it has continued to grow with the same values.

5. Authentique Agency

Authentique Agency provides a lot of information up front for their customers because they know that partnering with an agency (and choosing which one on top of that) is a big decision for scaling businesses. It does not only provide information about its values, it also tells about its long-standing experience in the industry as well as their primary goals when they work with clients.

6. The Cru

example company description: The CruThe Cru is a service that connects members with like-minded women to fuel personal and professional growth. They use an “Our Story” page as their company profile, where the founder details how the organization was formed and how she owns “Cru” (a play on the word “crew”). This summary is a testament to the value of the service. The “letter from the founder” style also feels very personal and welcoming.

7. H.J Russell & Company

Company description example: H&J Russell

H.J Russell & Company opens up its description with its history and specialities: “H. J. Russell & Company, founded over 60 years ago, is a vertically integrated service provider specializing in real estate development, construction, program management, and property management.” It also makes its values clear in the last sentence, so that you get a snapshot of the company’s values, key value proposition, and leadership status in just a few sentences.

8. Carol H. Williams

Company description example: Carol H. Williams

Carol H. Williams, an advertising agency, doesn’t have an “about” page or a formal company description. However, it displays a snapshot of what the company is all about in its “Team” page. It emphasizes its core values and uses trendy language (“#squadgoals”) to establish that it keeps up with the current trends.

Company Profile Templates

Company Profile Template

Download These Templates for Free

  • Company name
  • Established date
  • Physical address per location
  • Contact information

About Us / Our Story / Our Beginning

In this part of the company profile, you will need to include a brief introduction to your company, including where, when, and by whom the company was founded, the company’s mission statement, and/or the company’s vision and purpose. You don’t necessarily have to include products or services in this section yet, but focus on your bigger meaning, and how you stand out from competitors instead. Tell your story in a compelling way. For instance, HubSpot starts their About Us section with, “More than ten years ago, we had a vision — an inbound world”. HubSpot doesn’t mention their products until further down the page.

If you want to add your company history in a more compact way, consider adding a company timeline, like this one:

Company Profile Template: Company History

Download This Template

Our Mission / Values

Here, you need to say what your company stands for on a larger scale. You can state your ultimate goal, and your hopes for your products or services. Take a look at these inspiring company vision and mission statement examples for ideas. Here’s an example:

Company Profile Template: Mission & Values

Download This Template

Our Team

Provide a picture or brief paragraph describing your tea.You can focus on leadership, or provide an explanation of your company’s culture. Ultimately, this section should help users understand how your employees can uniquely serve them.

Company Profile Template: Meet the Team

Download This Template

Our Product / Services

Describe a high-level overview of what your product is, and how you hope it will positively impact the user’s life. You can link to a Product page if necessary, so keep this section relatively general.

Start Your Company Profile Today

There are a few elements that can contribute to a stellar company profile, and by adhering to a template, you can build one quickly and effectively.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in January 2019 but has been updated for comprehensiveness.Discover videos, templates, tips, and other resources dedicated to helping you  launch an effective video marketing strategy. 


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Is Twitter Still a Thing for Content Marketers in 2023?

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Is Twitter Still a Thing for Content Marketers in 2023?

The world survived the first three months of Elon Musk’s Twitter takeover.

But what are marketers doing now? Did your brand follow the shift Dennis Shiao made for his personal brand? As he recently shared, he switched his primary platform from Twitter to LinkedIn after the 2022 ownership change. (He still uses Twitter but posts less frequently.)

Are those brands that altered their strategy after the new ownership maintaining that plan? What impact do Twitter’s service changes (think Twitter Blue subscriptions) have?

We took those questions to the marketing community. No big surprise? Most still use Twitter. But from there, their responses vary from doing nothing to moving away from the platform.

Lowest points

At the beginning of the Elon era, more than 500 big-name advertisers stopped buying from the platform. Some (like Amazon and Apple) resumed their buys before the end of 2022. Brand accounts’ organic activity seems similar.

In November, Emplifi research found a 26% dip in organic posting behavior by U.S. and Canadian brands the week following a significant spike in the negative sentiment of an Elon tweet. But that drop in posting wasn’t a one-time thing.

Kyle Wong, chief strategy officer at Emplifi, shares a longer analysis of well-known fast-food brands. When comparing December 2021 to December 2022 activity, the brands posted 74% less, and December was the least active month of 2022.

Fast-food brands posted 74% less on @Twitter in December 2022 than they did in December 2021, according to @emplifi_io analysis via @AnnGynn @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

When Emplifi analyzed brand accounts across industries (2,330 from U.S. and Canada and 6,991 elsewhere in the world), their weekly Twitter activity also fell to low points in November and December. But by the end of the year, their activity was inching up.

“While the percentage of brands posting weekly is on the rise once again, the number is still lower than the consistent posting seen in earlier months,” Kyle says.

Quiet-quitting Twitter

Lacey Reichwald, marketing manager at Aha Media Group, says the company has been quiet-quitting Twitter for two months, simply monitoring and posting the occasional link. “It seems like the turmoil has settled down, but the overall impact of Twitter for brands has not recovered,” she says.

@ahamediagroup quietly quit @Twitter for two months and saw their follower count go up, says Lacey Reichwald via @AnnGynn @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

She points to their firm’s experience as a potential explanation. Though they haven’t been posting, their follower count has gone up, and many of those new follower accounts don’t seem relevant to their topic or botty. At the same time, Aha Media saw engagement and follows from active accounts in the customer segment drop.

Blue bonus

One change at Twitter has piqued some brands’ interest in the platform, says Dan Gray, CEO of Vendry, a platform for helping companies find agency partners to help them scale.

“Now that getting a blue checkmark is as easy as paying a monthly fee, brands are seeing this as an opportunity to build thought leadership quickly,” he says.

Though it remains to be seen if that strategy is viable in the long term, some companies, particularly those in the SaaS and tech space, are reallocating resources to energize their previously dormant accounts.

Automatic verification for @TwitterBlue subscribers led some brands to renew their interest in the platform, says Dan Gray of Vendry via @AnnGynn @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

These reenergized accounts also are seeing an increase in followers, though Dan says it’s difficult to tell if it’s an effect of the blue checkmark or their renewed emphasis on content. “Engagement is definitely up, and clients and agencies have both noted the algorithm seems to be favoring their content more,” he says.

New horizon

Faizan Fahim, marketing manager at Breeze, is focused on the future. They’re producing videos for small screens as part of their Twitter strategy. “We are guessing soon Elon Musk is going to turn Twitter into TikTok/YouTube to create more buzz,” he says. “We would get the first moving advantage in our niche.”

He’s not the only one who thinks video is Twitter’s next bet. Bradley Thompson, director of marketing at DigiHype Media and marketing professor at Conestoga College, thinks video content will be the next big thing. Until then, text remains king.

“The approach is the same, which is a focus on creating and sharing high-quality content relevant to the industry,” Bradley says. “Until Twitter comes out with drastically new features, then marketing and managing brands on Twitter will remain the same.

James Coulter, digital marketing director at Sole Strategies, says, “Twitter definitely still has a space in the game. The question is can they keep it, or will they be phased out in favor of a more reliable platform.”

Interestingly given the thoughts of Faizan and Bradley, James sees businesses turning to video as they limit their reliance on Twitter and diversify their social media platforms. They are now willing to invest in the resource-intensive format given the exploding popularity of TikTok, Instagram Reels, and other short-form video content.

“We’ve seen a really big push on getting vendors to help curate video content with the help of staff. Requesting so much media requires building a new (social media) infrastructure, but once the expectations and deliverables are in place, it quickly becomes engrained in the weekly workflow,” James says.

What now

“We are waiting to see what happens before making any strong decisions,” says Baruch Labunski, CEO at Rank Secure. But they aren’t sitting idly by. “We’ve moved a lot of our social media efforts to other platforms while some of these things iron themselves out.”

What is your brand doing with Twitter? Are you stepping up, stepping out, or standing still? I’d love to know. Please share in the comments.

Want more content marketing tips, insights, and examples? Subscribe to workday or weekly emails from CMI.

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Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute



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45 Free Content Writing Tools to Love [for Writing, Editing & Content Creation]

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45 Free Content Writing Tools to Love [for Writing, Editing & Content Creation]

Creating content isn’t always a walk in the park. (In fact, it can sometimes feel more like trying to swim against the current.)

While other parts of business and marketing are becoming increasingly automated, content creation is still a very manual job. (more…)

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MARKETING

How data clean rooms might help keep the internet open

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How data clean rooms might help keep the internet open

Are data clean rooms the solution to what IAB CEO David Cohen has called the “slow-motion train wreck” of addressability? Voices at the IAB will tell you that they have a big role to play.

“The issue with addressability is that once cookies go away, and with the loss of identifiers, about 80% of the addressable market will become unknown audiences which is why there is a need for privacy-centric consent and a better consent-value exchange,” said Jeffrey Bustos, VP, measurement, addressability and data at the IAB.

“Everyone’s talking about first-party data, and it is very valuable,” he explained, “but most publishers who don’t have sign-on, they have about 3 to 10% of their readership’s first-party data.” First-party data, from the perspective of advertisers who want to reach relevant and audiences, and publishers who want to offer valuable inventory, just isn’t enough.

Why we care. Two years ago, who was talking about data clean rooms? The surge of interest is recent and significant, according to the IAB. DCRs have the potential, at least, to keep brands in touch with their audiences on the open internet; to maintain viability for publishers’ inventories; and to provide sophisticated measurement capabilities.

How data clean rooms can help. DCRs are a type of privacy-enhancing technology that allows data owners (including brands and publishers) to share customer first-party data in a privacy-compliant way. Clean rooms are secure spaces where first-party data from a number of sources can be resolved to the same customer’s profile while that profile remains anonymized.

In other words, a DCR is a kind of Switzerland — a space where a truce is called on competition while first-party data is enriched without compromising privacy.

“The value of a data clean room is that a publisher is able to collaborate with a brand across both their data sources and the brand is able to understand audience behavior,” said Bestos. For example, a brand selling eye-glasses might know nothing about their customers except basic transactional data — and that they wear glasses. Matching profiles with a publisher’s behavioral data provides enrichment.

“If you’re able to understand behavioral context, you’re able to understand what your customers are reading, what they’re interested in, what their hobbies are,” said Bustos. Armed with those insights, a brand has a better idea of what kind of content they want to advertise against.

The publisher does need to have a certain level of first-party data for the matching to take place, even if it doesn’t have a universal requirement for sign-ins like The New York Times. A publisher may be able to match only a small percentage of the eye-glass vendor’s customers, but if they like reading the sports and arts sections, at least that gives some directional guidance as to what audience the vendor should target.

Dig deeper: Why we care about data clean rooms

What counts as good matching? In its “State of Data 2023” report, which focuses almost exclusively on data clean rooms, concern is expressed that DCR efficacy might be threatened by poor match rates. Average match rates hover around 50% (less for some types of DCR).

Bustos is keen to put this into context. “When you are matching data from a cookie perspective, match rates are usually about 70-ish percent,” he said, so 50% isn’t terrible, although there’s room for improvement.

One obstacle is a persistent lack of interoperability between identity solutions — although it does exist; LiveRamp’s RampID is interoperable, for example, with The Trade Desk’s UID2.

Nevertheless, said Bustos, “it’s incredibly difficult for publishers. They have a bunch of identity pixels firing for all these different things. You don’t know which identity provider to use. Definitely a long road ahead to make sure there’s interoperability.”

Maintaining an open internet. If DCRs can contribute to solving the addressability problem they will also contribute to the challenge of keeping the internet open. Walled gardens like Facebook do have rich troves of first-party and behavioral data; brands can access those audiences, but with very limited visibility into them.

“The reason CTV is a really valuable proposition for advertisers is that you are able to identify the user 1:1 which is really powerful,” Bustos said. “Your standard news or editorial publisher doesn’t have that. I mean, the New York Times has moved to that and it’s been incredibly successful for them.” In order to compete with the walled gardens and streaming services, publishers need to offer some degree of addressability — and without relying on cookies.

But DCRs are a heavy lift. Data maturity is an important qualification for getting the most out of a DCR. The IAB report shows that, of the brands evaluating or using DCRs, over 70% have other data-related technologies like CDPs and DMPs.

“If you want a data clean room,” Bustos explained, “there are a lot of other technological solutions you have to have in place before. You need to make sure you have strong data assets.” He also recommends starting out by asking what you want to achieve, not what technology would be nice to have. “The first question is, what do you want to accomplish? You may not need a DCR. ‘I want to do this,’ then see what tools would get you to that.”

Understand also that implementation is going to require talent. “It is a demanding project in terms of the set-up,” said Bustos, “and there’s been significant growth in consulting companies and agencies helping set up these data clean rooms. You do need a lot of people, so it’s more efficient to hire outside help for the set up, and then just have a maintenance crew in-house.”

Underuse of measurement capabilities. One key finding in the IAB’s research is that DCR users are exploiting the audience matching capabilities much more than realizing the potential for measurement and attribution. “You need very strong data scientists and engineers to build advanced models,” Bustos said.

“A lot of brands that look into this say, ‘I want to be able to do a predictive analysis of my high lifetime value customers that are going to buy in the next 90 days.’ Or ‘I want to be able to measure which channels are driving the most incremental lift.’ It’s very complex analyses they want to do; but they don’t really have a reason as to why. What is the point? Understand your outcome and develop a sequential data strategy.”

Trying to understand incremental lift from your marketing can take a long time, he warned. “But you can easily do a reach and frequency and overlap analysis.” That will identify wasted investment in channels and as a by-product suggest where incremental lift is occurring. “There’s a need for companies to know what they want, identify what the outcome is, and then there are steps that are going to get you there. That’s also going to help to prove out ROI.”

Dig deeper: Failure to get the most out of data clean rooms is costing marketers money


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