Connect with us

MARKETING

Put These Call-to-Action Tips on Your Favorites List

Published

on

Put These Call-to-Action Tips on Your Favorites List

Content can take your brand almost anywhere it wants to go.

But if you want your audience to take steps beyond viewing or reading, you need to show them where to go next. And that means creating a compelling call to action (CTA).

To help you achieve the results you want from your CTAs, I’ve gathered ideas and tips for the strategic fundamentals you’ll need. Review those, then keep reading for tactical tips and examples for making your copy more compelling, layouts more appealing, and campaigns more successful.

Set your audience on the right path with a compelling call to action, says @joderama via @CMIContent @semrush. #ContentMarketing Click To Tweet

Plan your approach strategically

You can’t ask consumers to act until you know what specific action you want them to take – and what might interest them in doing so.

Determine your target goal

Before you write your CTA or plot where and how to place it in your content, you need to decide the goal. Start with the consumer actions that deliver the greatest benefit to your business now.

Focus on the goals your business cares about most, typically one of the ones CMI founder Joe Pulizzi outlined:

Advertisement
  • Sales
  • ROI
  • Decreased costs
  • Improved customer loyalty and retention

But revenue-related conversions aren’t the only meaningful actions. You can focus CTAs around content marketing goals, like sending more traffic to your website, increasing downloads of lead-gen content, encouraging viewers to join your communities, or growing a subscribed audience.

Revenue-related CTAs aren’t the only meaningful actions. Think about #ContentMarketing goals, like driving more traffic to your site, increasing downloads, etc., says @joderama via @CMIContent @semrush. Click To Tweet

See also  A Checklist to Help You Establish Your Brand Identity

Make your offers contextually relevant

Take the audience’s context into consideration when planning your CTA and crafting the copy.

For example, imagine a consumer scrolling through their Instagram feed on their phone, and a picture of a trendy outfit from your summer catalog catches their attention. A CTA to visit your e-commerce site for more details about the clothes would be a natural fit, while a CTA to download the catalog might be too much to ask in this setting.

You’ll also want to make sure your CTA aligns well – message, tone, topic, and imagery – with the content it’s connected to. Continuing with the clothing example, a high-quality photo of someone wearing that trendy outfit to a summer BBQ could trigger FOMO (fear of missing out) feelings – and a click to your mobile storefront. Asking them to download a lengthy report on sustainable fabric sourcing practices would be out of place.

Lastly, whenever possible, match your CTA copy to the mindset and intent of your targeted consumers. Remember engaging with a content asset isn’t necessarily a signal that the consumer is looking to make a purchase right now (or at all) – especially for a high-consideration product like a car or an enterprise software solution. So, if you send an email to sales-qualified leads with a CTA for a 25% discount, it might be the perfect catalyst to buy. But if the email goes to everyone in your database, stick to lower-level commitments like downloading a white paper or attending a virtual product demo.

Match your #CTA to the mindset and intent of your targeted consumers, says @joderama via @CMIContent @semrush. Click To Tweet

See also  4 SEO Copywriting Tips For Sharper, More Effective Copy

HANDPICKED RELATED CONTENT:

Communicate clearly, succinctly, and convincingly

Calls-to-action point consumers to attractive offerings that might enhance their trust and satisfaction with your business. But if your CTAs derail their purpose, confuse them, or fail to deliver on the expectations you establish, you risk losing their attention for good.

Advertisement

Follow these creative tips to give your calls to action their best chance of success:

Keep them focused and short

Avoid inserting multiple calls into a single piece of content – there are only so many requests a reader will consider before they lose their focus. Get right to the point with brief, succinct statements that won’t confuse readers. Also, Pawan Deshpande says if you’re using a CTA button, long strings of text won’t have the same positive visual impact as a short one.

Provide clear direction 

Beginning your CTA with an active verb – like “Subscribe to our newsletter” or “Download our app” – tells consumers exactly what action you would like them to take, while vague statements like “Learn more” could lead to confusion or disinterest.

Be transparent about what happens next

Will clicking disrupt their content experience by taking them to an off-site page? Will that page contain the information they expect, or will they have to search around for it? Will they get direct access to the download your CTA referenced, or will there be a form? You may not have the space to include every detail of the experience that follows the click, but avoid ambiguity by using words like “register,” “sign up,” or “visit our site” to help set clear expectations.

See also  CORE Branding with Jeff J Hunter and Trisha Leconte [VIDEO]

Select words that set intentions

If your content’s purpose is to drive an immediate conversion, Shane Barker recommends creating a sense of urgency with words like “now,” “instant,” or “today.” If your message is meant to make your customers feel unique or special, he says using words like “custom” or “exclusive” can help convey that they’ll receive VIP treatment.

Use your available space wisely

Shane also points out that if your CTA comes at the end of a blog post or email, outlining your ask in a detailed sentence is acceptable. However, if you’re placing it elsewhere in your content or on a dedicated landing page, he says it’s best to limit the CTA to five to six words.

For social media content, available space and formatting options vary. Get familiar with each channel’s specifications before you publish or critical details may get cut off. Notice how the text gets cut off in the Doodly ad below to read: “Create Doodle Videos With Doodly. Zero Technical or De…”. Confused consumers are less likely to click.

A Doodly ad showing a green background with a white chalk outline of a man holding a laptop with the words "80% off!" on the laptop screen. The title of the ad reads "Easily Create Doodle Videos". The subhead reads "Special". The CTA below the image is cut off. It reads “Create Doodle Videos With Doodly. Zero Technical or De...”

Copy is cut off in Doodly’s CTA, which can confuse customers and make them less likely to click.

Advertisement

Show ’em the money (or other attractive benefits)

Who doesn’t wonder “what’s in it for me” when they see a promo touting a brand’s amazing features and competitive advantages? Focusing your CTA copy on the benefits consumers stand to receive can communicate greater personal relevance – and increase their interest in clicking.

For example, in this sponsored Facebook spot, BuzzSumo smartly syncs up its offer of a helpful content toolkit with a discount-centric CTA to sweeten the deal: “Feeling stuck? BuzzSumo’s all-in-one content toolkit can help generate ideas … Save now with 20% off annual subscriptions.”

BuzzSumo Facebook Sponsored post showing a blue box with the copy “Feeling stuck? BuzzSumo’s all-in-one content toolkit can help generate ideas … Save now with 20% off annual subscriptions.”

BuzzSumo aims to boost subscription purchases with a CTA that offers a 20% discount.

Brain training app Elevate doesn’t offer a discount, but its Instagram post features a checklist of attractive benefits that gives gamers a glimpse of what they might achieve if they install the app: Read faster, write more clearly, and speak with confidence.

Elevate’s checklist of benefits illustrates the value of clicking its CTA.

HANDPICKED RELATED CONTENT:

Perfect your placements

CTAs can’t do their jobs if consumers don’t notice them. So, marketers need to design and position them for optimal findability, appeal, and usability.

Some things to consider:

Advertisement
  • Don’t overwhelm your copy. Stuffing a CTA in the middle of short snippets of text, like a collection of curated quotes or a bulleted list, can disrupt the flow of your content, making it hard for readers to follow the story. Among his CTA tips for content curators, Pawan suggests placing calls within longer sections of copy, instead – for example, a detailed explanation of why the quotes you’ve cited are relevant.
  • Make them easy to spot and read. The above advice also applies to the visual aspects of your CTAs: They should fit with the accompanying content without getting lost. Think brightly colored buttons that grab attention but don’t stray from your brand’s style guide. Adjust the fonts and colors as necessary for the copy that sits on top of the buttons, so it’s clearly readable against the background.
  • Make them mobile-friendly. Mobile devices (excluding tablets) generated 4% of global website traffic in 2021. Your CTAs should follow best practices for mobile-responsive content. Make buttons large enough that visitors won’t accidentally click on the wrong spots, and double-check that your copy doesn’t get cut off on a small screen. Consider using click-to-call features or substitute drop-down selections for detailed forms so mobile users don’t have to type a lot to accept your offer.

HANDPICKED RELATED CONTENT:


ADVERTISEMENT

The State of Content Marketing 2022 Global Report

500K articles analyzed. 1,500 marketers surveyed. 9 experts interviewed. Download the biggest industry report by Semrush and explore thousands of data points to build a better content marketing strategy.


Grab extra attention with unique designs and special features

Speaking of opt-in form alternatives, Treasure Data CMO Tom Treanor shared some formats commonly used to drive subscriptions that can be adapted for other marketing goals. Below are a few of his suggestions for making your CTAs more visible, dynamic, and inviting. (You can find additional ideas in his article on ways to get more opt-ins from your content.)

The pop-up

“The pop-up is one of the most familiar opt-in forms for a good reason,” says Tom. “Even the data scientist of HubSpot found it increases email opt-ins without hurting anything else.”

That lesson can be observed in this pop-up CTA with the message: “Do You To Convert Your Abandoning Visitors Into Subscribers?” followed by yes and no buttons to register for a free 14-day trial.

An example of a CTA formatted as a pop-up from HubSpot.

The pop-up is one of the most familiar opt-in forms and for a good reason. Even the data scientist of @HubSpot found that it increases email opt-ins, says @RtMixMktg via @joderama @CMIContent @semrush. Click To Tweet

The slide-in

Tom says slide-ins create dynamic movement, which can help draw the viewer’s attention. He also reminds marketers that timing your slide-in is important: “You want to catch visitors before they click away.”

He shares an example from AppSumo, which slides into view with an attractive offer of insider knowledge – “Learn exactly how I grew AppSumo to 700,000+ subscribers” –followed by a space to enter an email address and receive that information.

An example of a CTA that slides into view from the side of the screen.

Advertisement

The footer CTA

“Once people have finished reading a great piece of content, they are more likely to consider other offerings from your brand,” says Tom. The footer option capitalizes on this concept. “You can use it with a lead-magnet offer or message that invites people to get similar content by subscribing.”

In this example from Fleet Feet, the footer includes a built-in CTA reading “Join Our Newsletter” with a field to enter an email address.

An example of a post footer CTA from Fleet Feet.

Use tech and personalization to your advantage

If you’re ready to take your CTAs further, apply some of these more customized approaches. Their benefits range from simplifying the design and implementation process to enhancing personal resonance.

Leverage the power of tech

In a recent post on improving sales enablement content, Ann Smarty recommended a few tech tools that can make CTA customization and implementation easier:

  • Vcita lets marketers create customizable and contextual widgets that help ensure that CTAs appear in content where they’re most relevant and appropriate.
  • Finteza offers the ability to dynamically serve different CTAs depending on what page the visitor first lands on, the site they were referred from, or prior actions they may have performed on your site. Marketers choose which site pages the modules appear on and the campaign length.

Get up close and personal

You can use CTAs to gather first-party data (an increasingly important goal as privacy regulations limit third-party cookies). For example, Los Angeles-based media site LAist targeted voters with the sponsored Instagram post shown here. While the “Learn more” CTA is standard fare, it’s paired with a political matchmaking quiz to help users determine which of the seven candidates on the primary ballot align most strongly with their views on key issues.

LAist cleverly tempts readers to click the CTA to get personalized election guidance with the copy: “Meet your Mayor – A political matchmaking quiz for LA voters.” The visual catches the eye with circular headshots of each of the seven candidates.

Go beyond the obvious

Shop now, sign-up, register today … spend a few minutes perusing your social feeds and you’ll see a dozen ads using these simple imperatives. You might have a better chance of standing apart and capturing their clicks with an unexpected approach.

For example, cosmetics company Il Makiage is building its brand on a try-before-you-buy model. In keeping with that concept, the company featured a “Watch the transformation” CTA on a recent Instagram post, which clicks through to a video of @realbettymaxwell trying the brand’s makeup.

Advertisement

The CTA in this Il Makiage’s social spot creates intrigue with the promise of an exciting transformation.

 

Consumers who click through on the Il Makiage CTA see the brand’s products in action.

In her sales-enablement discussion, Ann Smarty offered another unique CTA approach: the in-content form. “It’s designed to feel more like a one-on-one interaction than an institutional form completion,” says Ann.

She shared this example of WordPress plug-in Conversational Forms, which lets visitors answer one question before a new question appears.

A sample of WordPress plug-in Conversational Forms. Image via Wpforms.com.

Stop using institutional field completion forms. A tool like Conversational Forms from @easywpforms lets visitors answer a question before a new question appears, says @SEOSmarty via @joderama @CMIContent @semrush. Click To Tweet

Create CTAs that compel customers to act

Despite their simplicity, effective CTAs involve a lot of strategic and creative decisions. Are you giving your CTAs the attention they deserve? Have any tips we may have missed? Let us know by posting a comment.

Advertisement

All tools mentioned in this article are identified by the author. If you have a tool to suggest, please add it in the comments.

Want more content marketing tips, insights, and examples? Subscribe to workday or weekly emails from CMI.

Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute



Source link

MARKETING

B2B customer journeys that begin at review sites are significantly shorter

Published

on

B2B customer journeys that begin at review sites are significantly shorter

The B2B customer journey can be a long one, especially when the purchase of expensive software subscriptions is under consideration.

“The average B2B customer journey takes 192 days from anonymous first touch to won,” according to Dreamdata in their 2022 B2B Go-to-Market Benchmarks — a statistic described by co-founder and CMO Steffen Hedebrandt as “alarming.”

But the report also indicates that this journey can be significantly sped up — by as much as 63% — if accounts begin their research at software review sites, gathering information and opinions from their peers. Journeys that originate at a review site often lead to deals of higher value too.

Fragmented data on the customer journey. Dreamdata is a B2B go-to-market platform. In any B2B company, explained Hedebrandt, there are typically 10 or even 20 data silos that contain fragments of the customer journey. Website visits, white paper downloads, social media interactions, webinar or meeting attendance, demos, and of course intent data from review site visits — this data doesn’t typically sit in one place within an organization.

“We built an account-based data model because we believe that there’s such a thing as an account journey and not an individual journey,” said Hedebrandt. “So if there are two, three or five people representing an account, which is typically what you see in B2B, all of these touches get mapped into the same timeline.”

Among those many touches is the intent data sourced from software review site G2. Dreamdata has an integration with G2 and a G2 dashboard allowing visualization of G2-generated intent data. This includes filtering prospects who are early in their journey, who have not yet discovered the customer’s product, or who have discovered it but are still searching. This creates a basis for attributing pipelines, conversions and revenue to the activity.

See also  CMOs, put these 4 trends at the top of your agenda for success this year

“Strategically, our ideal customer profile is a B2B software-as-a-service company,” said Hedenbrandt. “B2B SaaS companies are particularly ripe for understanding this digital customer journey; their main investment is in digital marketing, they have a salesforce that use software tools to do this inside sales model; and they also deliver their product digitally as well.” What’s more, it takes twice as long to close SaaS deal as it does to close deals with B2B commercial and professional services companies.

Advertisement

Read next: A look at the tech review space

The Benchmarks findings. The conclusions of the 2022 Benchmarks report is based on aggregated, anonymized data from more than 400 Dreamdata user accounts. Focusing on first-touch attribution (from their multi-touch model), Dreamdata found that customer journeys where a review site is the first touch are 63% shorter than the average. In contrast, where the first touch channel is social, the journey is much longer than average (217%); it’s the same when paid media is the first touch (155%).

As the Benchmarks report suggests, this may well mean that social is targeting prospects that are just not in-market. It makes sense that activity on a review site is a better predictor of intent.

Hedenbrandt underlines the importance of treating the specific figures with caution. “It’s not complete science what we’ve done,” he admits, “but it’s real data from 400 accounts, so it’s not going to be completely off. You can only spend your time once, and at least from what we can see here it’s better to spend your time collecting reviews than writing another Facebook update.”

See also  Does your organization need a marketing automation platform?

While Dreamdata highlights use of G2, Hedenbrandt readily concedes that competitor software review sites might reasonably be expected to show similar effects. “Definitely I would expect it to be similar.”

Why we care. It’s not news that B2B buyers researching software purchases use review sites and that those sites gather and trade in the intent data generated. Software vendors encourage users to post reviews. There has been a general assumption that a large number of hopefully positive reviews is a good thing to have.


Get the daily newsletter digital marketers rely on.

Advertisement


What Dreamdata’s findings indicate is that the effect of review sites on the buyer journey — especially as the first-touch channel — can be quantified and a value placed on it. “None of us questioned the value of reviews, but during this process you can actually map it into a customer journey where you can see the journey started from G2, then flowed into sales meetings, website visits, ads, etc. Then we can also join the deal value to the intent that started from G2.”

Likely, this is also another example of B2B learning from B2C. People looking at high consideration B2C purchases are now accustomed to seeking advice both from friends and from online reviews. The same goes for SaaS purchases, Hedenbrandt suggests: “More people are turning to sites like G2 to understand whether this is a trustworthy vendor or not. The more expensive it is, the more validation you want to see.”


About The Author

Advertisement

Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space.

See also  How 500 Marketers are Leveraging Instagram Shopping Tools [Data]

He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020.

Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.

Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending

en_USEnglish