Connect with us

SEO

25 Best Examples Of Effective FAQ Pages

Published

on

25 Best Examples Of Effective FAQ Pages

Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) pages (or informational hubs) enable your business to respond, react, and anticipate the needs of your audience more quickly and appropriately than other types of destination page experiences.

An effective FAQ resource can educate, inform, and naturally guide the user through your website’s content and toward the goals and results you have set.

Over the years, the role of the FAQ page has changed substantially, and now an FAQ page is an essential webpage to have on your site.

Why An FAQ Resource?

Firstly, FAQ pages can bring new visitors to your website via organic search and drive them quickly to related pages – most typically deeper blog pages and service pages closely related to the questions being resolved.

Next, one of the most significant opportunities for impactful brand visibility within the search engine result pages (in-SERP) is targeting audience questions, wants, needs, and pain points.

The FAQ page is one of the best ways to help people visit your site and get snippets of answers in front of users before they click any results within the search pages.

A helpful FAQ page (more likely an FAQ hub of core pages and topical intent) shortens the time it takes for people to solve their search requirements.

The experience from the first visit to conversion is also faster because you remove any possible barriers to knowledge (informational and often trust).

As a company, you are showcasing expertise through FAQs, plus introducing your key staff, knowledge, and unique insights into the industry sooner.

You add credibility and value through meaningful content in the many forms your audience requires. This will typically include audio, visual/video, and layering of content types now, compared to traditional text-only content provision.

You are also servicing the need for offline conversation and experience through faster and always available online mechanisms.

People will always seek help and advice. They are unwilling to pick up the phone, walk into a store, or wait hours (even minutes) for that information or insight to become accessible.

It needs to be available now and in the format they enjoy the most.

Why FAQ Pages Are A Priority

FAQ pages continue to be a priority area for SEO and digital marketing professionals.

An FAQ page is one of the simplest ways to improve your site and help site visitors and users.

Your FAQ section should be seen as a constantly expanding source of value provided to your audience. It is a place where their ever-changing and growing requirements are not only met but anticipated and exceeded frequently.

In no small part, the importance of FAQ pages has been driven in recent years by the growth in voice search, mobile search, and personal/home assistants and speakers.

These predominantly rely on the pre-results (Google Answers and Featured Snippets) and can be explicitly targeted with FAQ pages.

People need conversation, comparison, and support for most of their decision-making online and offline; FAQs can cater to them all.

An effective FAQ page seeks to:

  • Reflect and respond to your audience’s needs wholly and thoroughly.
  • Cover a broad range of intent (transactional, informational, locational, etc.).
  • Stay updated based on new insights from your data, the industry, and broader best practices.
  • Land new users to the website by solving problems and supporting return visits with regular additions and valuable expertise sharing.
  • Drive internal pageviews to other important pages and support key conversion paths.
  • Fuel blog (and deeper content) creation logically and intuitively ties together semantically relevant content.
  • Shine a light on expertise, trust, and authority within your niche, giving your brand and key staff a platform to educate, inform, and support your community.

25 Of The Best Examples Of FAQ Pages

Now let’s look at 25 great examples of FAQ pages/resources and why they’re so effective.

1. Twitter

Twitter’s FAQ help center made a list as it factored in some fascinating personalization, easy-to-use search functionality, and has a positive user experience (something few FAQ pages ever achieve).

Screenshot from Twitter, July 2022

2. YouTube

YouTube’s FAQ page is clean, fresh, simple to use, and provides access to the most commonly asked “help” topics.

As you might expect, content delivery combines video/visual content with standard textual content. The role of mixed content types in FAQ pages is something often overlooked.

YouTube FAQ pageScreenshot from YouTube, July 2022

3. McDonald’s

The McDonald’s FAQ page feels informal and sociable, encouraging people to share their FAQ experiences (a rarity).

McDonald's Help - FAQ Page ExampleScreenshot from mcdonalds.com, July 2022

4. WhatsApp

The FAQ resource for Whatsapp is bright, easy to use, and categorized effectively for quick desktop or mobile use.

When considering the functional role and practical requirements of an FAQ resource, it can be easy to forget the importance of loading time and speed of access to information.

Whats App FAQ PageScreenshot from faq.whatsapp.com, July 2022

5. Wikipedia

Wikipedia’s help center is an excellent example of an “old-school” FAQ page.

It is text-heavy, blocked into key topic areas, and has extensive access to all the critical support areas you could ever need.

There is something necessary, meaningful and nostalgic about FAQ-orientated websites like this, plus they are hugely helpful and remain more than fit for purpose.

wikipedia help centreScreenshot from en.wikipedia.org, July 2022

6. The University of East Anglia (UEA)

The University of East Anglia FAQ resource is more of an inbuilt problem-solving informational architecture than a separate FAQ resource.

This type of audience understanding throughout every critical section and site navigation reflects the potential to continuously service and support your audience as a core part of the business positioning.

Example of the University of East Anglia - FAQ Page HubScreenshot from uea.ac.uk, July 2022

7. UCAS

The FAQs section of UCAS  is simple, scaled back, and concise.

It includes a prompt to ask if the information was helpful and to gather user feedback to improve the resource.

This type of first-party/direct user feedback loop is excellent as it demonstrates a willingness to refine and improve the FAQ section iteratively.

UCAS FAQsScreenshot from ucas.com, July 2022

8. Foresters Friendly Society

The Foresters Friendly Society FAQ page example showcases topic-specific FAQ content clusters or hubs in action.

This facilitates a quick and effective experience for people to explore topics in detail that matter to them the most, without the added clicks or distractions of single-stop (all-topic) FAQ destinations.

Foresters Friendly Society - Example FAQ PageScreenshot from forestersfriendlysociety.co.uk, July 2022

9. Ontrack

The standout features of the Ontrack FAQ section include the simplified user experience and bold, functional (dialed back) access to crucial information.

The content isn’t cluttered, it’s easy to skim read, plus you can switch between FAQ-related resources within a single click to service various layers of user intent.

Example of Ontrack UK - FAQ ResourceScreenshot from ontrack.com, July 2022

10. DaysOutGuide

DaysOutGuide’s frequently asked questions resource incorporates tags to make the most out of single-click functionality for all device access to information.

The balance between text, images, and interactive features works well.

Content segments are demarked and intuitive.

daysoutguide faqsScreenshot from daysoutguide.co.uk, July 2022

11. SendInBlue

SendInBlue’s FAQs are by far the most basic by design (single grid defined by thin square design categories) included in this list of my best and most effective FAQs, but they work.

It’s a simple solution but almost always overlooked.

This offers a helpful reminder that it is the content value and ease of access to information instead of over-design when it comes to effective FAQ pages.

Send In Blue FAQsScreenshot from help.sendinblue.com, July 2022

12. FreeSpirit

The FreeSpirit FAQ page combines useful information navigational features with interactive content to empower users to progress through the site and make buying decisions faster.

Free Spirit FAQsScreenshot from freespirittravelinsurance.com, July 2022

13. Amazon Web Services

Amazon Web Services’ FAQs are functional, easy to skim through, and categorized for use.

There are no frills here.

But, in some cases, it’s better to get straight to the point.

Amazon Web Services FAQsScreenshot from aws.amazon.com, July 2022

14. Silicone Engineering

Silicone Engineering’s FAQs help demystify a traditionally complex industry.

The combination of quick links, ask the expert, and more profound content answers work well for the user regardless of time availability or device used.

Engineering and related industries can seem daunting to many, so this content distillation is always a welcome experience for the user.

Silicone Engineering FAQsScreenshot from silicone.co.uk, July 2022

15. Dropbox

Dropbox Help brings fun to the FAQ area with the choice of images and encourages the user to experience the site through self-discovery.

It’s a helpful reminder that FAQs can be a fun and engaging way to bring your brand in front of new and existing audiences in various ways.

Dropbox Help Center Example Screenshot from help.dropbox.com, July 2022

16. TUI

TUI FAQs are in a grid format, include depth of topical coverage, and reflect the volumes of information available on the site.

The resource is not overly pretty by design, but it works and almost has a retro feel.

tui faqsScreenshot from tui.co.uk, July 2022

17. UPS

The UPS Help and Support Centre includes a virtual chat assistant which leverages the FAQs above the static functionality of most.

Chatbots are ideal FAQ considerations mainly based on their ability to expedite and drive the user journey (a key effectiveness area for any help and FAQ resource).

UPS FAQ PageScreenshot from ups.com, July 2022

18. Trent Furniture

In this example, the Trent Furniture FAQ and guides section acts as both an FAQ resource and a guide roll-up resource.

This means that users can access top-level information, deeper, more comprehensive buying guides, measurement information, and a whole host of other insights normally only accessible through blogs.

For ecommerce sites, it’s positive to access layers of content depth relevant to your buying decisions – whether you intend to purchase in the same session or are working your way through the buying and information-seeking journey.

Trent Furniture Guides and FAQs ExampleScreenshot from trentfurniture.co.uk, July 2022

19. FatFace

The FatFace help center and FAQs resource is a practical example of a bigger brand getting it right.

The help center places the users first with the topics covered and still manages to feel personable and helpful.

FatFace Help Centre Example FAQ ResourceScreenshot from fatface.com, July 2022

20. Stewarts Law

This Stewarts Law FAQs example demonstrates the multipurpose nature of informational content.

This case merges traditional news and article content provision alongside FAQs, insights, and broader expert opinions.

Stewarts Law - News Insights and FAQs ExampleScreenshot from stewartslaw.com, July 2022

21. Pinterest

Pinterest’s Help Center takes simplicity to the next level.

The design and information provided are prioritized for the mobile user by combining visual and textual triggers.

FAQ resources should place function first, and that’s clear in this example.

Pinterest Help - FAQ PageScreenshot from help.pinterest.com, July 2022

22. Elite Island Holidays UK

The audience’s needs drive Elite Island Holidays’ FAQs and set out to answer people’s holiday dilemmas, from preparation to last-minute help and support.

The blog nature of the answers means that the site visitor doesn’t need to travel beyond the FAQs page for help.

FAQ answers’ completeness can vary by industry and on a site-by-site basis.

In this example, the more profound content provision is good to see and helps prevent multiple clicks or return to search engine query refinement to find a complete answer.

Elite Island Resorts FAQsScreenshot from eliteislandholidays.com, July 2022

23. Airtable

Airtable’s Help Center is fun, visually driven, and even provides helpful information on how to use the FAQ section.

Making a help resource fun isn’t easy. However, Airtable has achieved this.

I like to be objective (as much as possible with opinion-based topics like this) and consider FAQ pages that stand out with clear purpose and thought.

Airtable's Help CenterScreenshot from support.airtable.com, July 2022

24. Pretty Little Thing

The FAQs on Pretty Little Thing immediately tell their audience and position the design and content accordingly.

The FAQs also appear well thought out and enticing to interact with.

The clickable visual elements reflect mobile and all device interaction, which is essential for online mobile-first and all device expectations.

Pretty Little Thing FAQScreenshot from prettylittlething.com, July 2022

25. First Direct

First Direct’s FAQs, Help Center, and Tools/Guide Resource brings many information-rich segmented guides and financial tools into one place.

Making often complex and dry financial topics straightforward and accessible is not easy, but this section does it well.

First Direct FAQ - Help Section ExampleScreenshot from www1.firstdirect.com, July 2022

Creating An Effective FAQ page

Whether you have an FAQ page in place, believe it can contribute more, or are looking to create a new FAQ resource for your website, it’s essential to consider the next steps.

Remember not to overlook the necessity to gather data in your FAQ section. Use this to continue adding to it, refine, and expand the ongoing value provision to your audience.

Your FAQ resource needs to be proactively updated to cater to all the new and ever-changing data sets reflecting your existing and new community requirements, offline and online.

1. Decide On The Purpose Of The FAQ Page

Suppose you wish to bring your experts to the foreground and provide ongoing audience support. In that case, your FAQ hub will function very differently than it would if you intend to increase the ease of access to know cornerstone content on your website.

You need to have a clearly defined FAQ section purpose and ensure you support this with business objectives and KPIs.

This helps maintain prioritization and justification to keep investing resources and focus on FAQ development alongside more traditional commercial website pages.

2. Plan In Advance To Maintain And Grow Your FAQ Hub

Your audience questions will change frequently, and you must ensure that your FAQ content reflects this.

Data within Google Search Console (GSC), on-site search behavior, plus broader industry trends will help inform this.

Don’t limit your data gathering to a single source, however.

Look at the competition, consider Google Rich Results (using tools such as Semrush), and look at the completeness of your expertise provision through your FAQ content.

3. Look Outside Of Your Company Data Environment

While your data is fantastic for servicing your existing customer base, there are often multiple layers of FAQs to fulfill.

You can use free tools such as Answer the Public for more general questions, Google Trends, and competitor sites.

The opportunity to answer In-SERP questions grows all the time. You want to be present in these conversations by showcasing your FAQ content and creating compelling content types to target these items correctly.

4. Structuring FAQs

Both your page and individual FAQs (whether a single FAQ page or entire sections of your site specific to FAQ content) need some consideration on how you structure them and make a lot of varied content accessible for the user and search engines alike.

Consider the expandable on-click text at the individual FAQ level to keep answers clean and easy to use.

At the page structure level, take time to prioritize content based on value and demand, plus technical optimization areas such as the use of schema, page speed, and mobile-friendliness.

Remember that people look to digest content in many ways.

FAQ content does not have to be text only. It’s far broader reaching and valuable to people and for search if it’s multi-tiered and varied in content types.

5. Use Data To Refine & Improve: Part Of ‘Always On’ Focus

FAQ pages quickly become outdated, and their value declines over time.

Make sure you are testing page changes and iteratively improving everything from headings and clickable page elements to new data-led content additions and calls to action.

Every month there will be evidence-led chances to improve, and this mentality is key to maximizing business and user impact.

6. Don’t Forget The People Element

The most successful FAQ pages and help center hubs often stem from a deeper understanding of the people they are intended to help.

Data and evidence are always important, but you must balance this with real-world insights and offline experiences.

The best people to help with this are the front-line staff, who actively engage with your audience daily and truly understand how online and offline FAQs can support and enrich your problem-solving offering.

Your FAQ section supports your staff as much as it’s present to help educate and inform your community.

Think about your recurring conversations and how they can be served equally well online.

Don’t forget mixed content types to replicate the offline experience online, plus the need to gather feedback from your users directly.

As a final quick tip: Every FAQ resource, however complete it may appear, will have new ways to leverage the value received from it and areas to grow.

You can often reposition existing content for new search opportunities, bolster and expand its depth and value, plus create unique visual content from a text-only provision for many short-term and ongoing gains.

More Resources:


Featured Image: Kavaleuskaya Aksana/Shutterstock



Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

SEO

Technical SEO Checklist for 2024: A Comprehensive Guide

Published

on

Technical SEO Checklist 2024 Comprehensive Strategies

Technical SEO Checklist 2024 Comprehensive Strategies

With Google getting a whopping total of six algorithmic updates and four core updates in 2023, you can bet the search landscape is more complicated (and competitive) to navigate nowadays.

To succeed in SEO this year, you will need to figure out what items to check and optimize to ensure your website stays visible. And if your goal is to not just make your website searchable, but have it rank at the top of search engine results, this technical SEO checklist for 2024 is essential.

Webmaster’s Note: This is part one of our three-part SEO checklist for 2024. I also have a longer guide on advanced technical SEO, which covers best practices and how to troubleshoot and solve common technical issues with your websites.

Technical SEO Essentials for 2024

Technical SEO refers to optimizations that are primarily focused on helping search engines access, crawl, interpret, and index your website without any issues. It lays the foundation for your site to be properly understood and served up by search engines to users.

1. Website Speed Optimization

A site’s loading speed is a significant ranking factor for search engines like Google, which prioritize user experience. Faster websites generally provide a more pleasant user experience, leading to increased engagement and improved conversion rates.

Server Optimization

Often, the reason why your website is loading slowly is because of the server it’s hosted on. It’s important to choose a high-quality server that ensures quick loading times from the get-go so you skip the headache that is server optimization.

Google recommends keeping your server response time under 200ms. To check your server’s response time, you need to know your website’s IP address. Once you have that, use your command prompt.

In the window that appears, type ping, followed by your website’s IP address. Press enter and the window should show how long it took your server to respond. 

If you find that your server goes above the recommended 200ms loading time, here’s what you need to check:

  1. Collect the data from your server and identify what is causing your response time to increase. 
  2. Based on what is causing the problem, you will need to implement server-side optimizations. This guide on how to reduce initial server response times can help you here.
  3. Measure your server response times after optimization to use as a benchmark. 
  4. Monitor any regressions after optimization.

If you work with a hosting service, then you should contact them when you need to improve server response times. A good hosting provider should have the right infrastructure, network connections, server hardware, and support services to accommodate these optimizations. They may also offer hosting options if your website needs more server resources to run smoothly.

Website Optimization

Aside from your server, there are a few other reasons that your website might be loading slowly. 

Here are some practices you can do:

  1. Compressing images to decrease file sizes without sacrificing quality
  2. Minimizing the code, eliminating unnecessary spaces, comments, and indentation.
  3. Using caching to store some data locally in a user’s browser to allow for quicker loading on subsequent visits.
  4. Implementing Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) to distribute the load, speeding up access for users situated far from the server.
  5. Lazy load your web pages to prioritize loading the objects or resources only your users need.

A common tool to evaluate your website speed is Google’s PageSpeed Insights or Google Lighthouse. Both tools can analyze the content of your website and then generate suggestions to improve its overall loading speed, all for free. There are also some third-party tools, like GTMetrix, that you could use as well.

Here’s an example of one of our website’s speeds before optimization. It’s one of the worst I’ve seen, and it was affecting our SEO.

slow site speed score from GTMetrixslow site speed score from GTMetrix

So we followed our technical SEO checklist. After working on the images, removing render-blocking page elements, and minifying code, the score greatly improved — and we saw near-immediate improvements in our page rankings. 

site speed optimization results from GTMetrixsite speed optimization results from GTMetrix

That said, playing around with your server settings, coding, and other parts of your website’s backend can mess it up if you don’t know what you’re doing. I suggest backing up all your files and your database before you start working on your website speed for that reason. 

2. Mobile-First Indexing

Mobile-first Indexing is a method used by Google that primarily uses the mobile version of the content for indexing and ranking. 

It’s no secret that Google places a priority on the mobile users’ experience, what with mobile-first indexing being used. Beyond that, optimizing your website for mobile just makes sense, given that a majority of people now use their phones to search online.

This change signifies that a fundamental shift in your approach to your website development and design is needed, and it should also be part of your technical SEO checklist.

  1. Ensuring the mobile version of your site contains the same high-quality, rich content as the desktop version.
  2. Make sure metadata is present on both versions of your site.
  3. Verify that structured data is present on both versions of your site.

Tools like Google’s mobile-friendly test can help you measure how effectively your mobile site is performing compared to your desktop versions, and to other websites as well.

3. Crawlability & Indexing Check

Always remember that crawlability and Indexing are the cornerstones of SEO. Crawlability refers to a search engine’s ability to access and crawl through a website’s content. Indexing is how search engines organize information after a crawl and before presenting results.

  1. Utilizing a well-structured robots.txt file to communicate with web crawlers about which of your pages should not be processed or scanned.
  2. Using XML sitemaps to guide search engines through your site’s content and ensure that all valuable content is found and indexed. There are several CMS plugins you can use to generate your sitemap.
  3. Ensuring that your website has a logical structure with a clear hierarchy, helps both users and bots navigate to your most important pages easily. 

Google Search Console is the tool you need to use to ensure your pages are crawled and indexed by Google. It also provides reports that identify any problems that prevent crawlers from indexing your pages. 

4. Structured Data Markup

Structured Data Markup is a coding language that communicates website information in a more organized and richer format to search engines. This plays a strategic role in the way search engines interpret and display your content, enabling enhanced search results through “rich snippets” such as stars for reviews, prices for products, or images for recipes.

Doing this allows search engines to understand and display extra information directly in the search results from it.

Key Takeaway

With all the algorithm changes made in 2023, websites need to stay adaptable and strategic to stay at the top of the search results page. Luckily for you, this technical SEO checklist for 2024 can help you do just that. Use this as a guide to site speed optimization, indexing, and ensuring the best experience for mobile and desktop users.

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

SEO

Why Google Seems To Favor Big Brands & Low-Quality Content

Published

on

By

Why Google Seems To Favor Big Brands & Low-Quality Content

Many people are convinced that Google shows a preference for big brands and ranking low quality content, something that many feel has become progressively worse. This may not be a matter of perception, something is going on, nearly everyone has an anecdote of poor quality search results. The possible reasons for it are actually quite surprising.

Google Has Shown Favoritism In The Past

This isn’t the first time that Google’s search engine results pages (SERPs) have shown a bias that favored big brand websites. During the early years of Google’s algorithm it was obvious that sites with a lot of PageRank ranked for virtually anything they wanted.

For example, I remember a web design company that built a lot of websites, creating a network of backlinks, raising their PageRank to a remarkable level normally seen only in big corporate sites like IBM. As a consequence they ranked for the two-word keyword phrase, Web Design and virtually every other variant like Web Design + [any state in the USA].

Everyone knew that websites with a PageRank of 10, the highest level shown on Google’s toolbar, practically had a free pass in the SERPs, resulting in big brand sites outranking more relevant webpages. It didn’t go unnoticed when Google eventually adjusted their algorithm to fix this issue.

The point of this anecdote is to point out an instance of where Google’s algorithm unintentionally created a bias that favored big brands.

Here are are other  algorithm biases that publishers exploited:

  • Top 10 posts
  • Longtail “how-to” articles
  • Misspellings
  • Free Widgets in footer that contained links (always free to universities!)

Big Brands And Low Quality Content

There are two things that have been a constant for all of Google’s history:

  • Low quality content
  • Big brands crowding out small independent publishers

Anyone that’s ever searched for a recipe knows that the more general the recipe the lower the quality of recipe that gets ranked. Search for something like cream of chicken soup and the main ingredient for nearly every recipe is two cans of chicken soup.

A search for Authentic Mexican Tacos results in recipes with these ingredients:

  • Soy sauce
  • Ground beef
  • “Cooked chicken”
  • Taco shells (from the store!)
  • Beer

Not all recipe SERPs are bad. But some of the more general recipes Google ranks are so basic that a hobo can cook them on a hotplate.

Robin Donovan (Instagram), a cookbook author and online recipe blogger observed:

“I think the problem with google search rankings for recipes these days (post HCU) are much bigger than them being too simple.

The biggest problem is that you get a bunch of Reddit threads or sites with untested user-generated recipes, or scraper sites that are stealing recipes from hardworking bloggers.

In other words, content that is anything but “helpful” if what you want is a tested and well written recipe that you can use to make something delicious.”

Explanations For Why Google’s SERPs Are Broken

It’s hard not to get away from the perception that Google’s rankings for a variety of topics always seem to default to big brand websites and low quality webpages.

Small sites grow to become big brands that dominate the SERPs, it happens. But that’s the thing, even when a small site gets big, it’s now another big brand dominating the SERPs.

Typical explanations for poor SERPs:

  • It’s a conspiracy to increase ad clicks
  • Content itself these days are low quality across the board
  • Google doesn’t have anything else to rank
  • It’s the fault of SEOs
  • Affiliates
  • Poor SERPs is Google’s scheme to drive more ad clicks
  • Google promotes big brands because [insert your conspiracy]

So what’s going on?

People Love Big Brands & Garbage Content

The recent Google anti-trust lawsuit exposed the importance of the Navboost algorithm signals as a major ranking factor. Navboost is an algorithm that interprets user engagement signals to understand what topics a webpage is relevant for, among other things.

The idea of using engagement signals as an indicator of what users expect to see makes sense. After all, Google is user-centric and who better to decide what’s best for users than the users themselves, right?

Well, consider that arguably the the biggest and most important song of 1991, Smells Like Teen Spirt by Nirvana, didn’t make the Billboard top 100 for that year. Michael Bolton and Rod Stewart made the list twice, with Rod Stewart top ranked for a song called “The Motown Song” (anyone remember that one?)

Nirvana didn’t make the charts until the next year…

My opinion, given that we know that user interactions are a strong ranking signal, is that Google’s search rankings follow a similar pattern related to users’ biases.

People tend to choose what they know. It’s called a Familiarity Bias.

Consumers have a habit of choosing things that are familiar over those that are unfamiliar. This preference shows up in product choices that prefer brands, for example.

Behavioral scientist, Jason Hreha, defines Familiarity Bias like this:

“The familiarity bias is a phenomenon in which people tend to prefer familiar options over unfamiliar ones, even when the unfamiliar options may be better. This bias is often explained in terms of cognitive ease, which is the feeling of fluency or ease that people experience when they are processing familiar information. When people encounter familiar options, they are more likely to experience cognitive ease, which can make those options seem more appealing.”

Except for certain queries (like those related to health), I don’t think Google makes an editorial decision to certain kinds of websites, like brands.

Google uses many signals for ranking. But Google is strongly user focused.

I believe it’s possible that strong user preferences can carry a more substantial weight than Reviews System signals. How else to explain why Google seemingly has a bias for big brand websites with fake reviews rank better than honest independent review sites?

It’s not like Google’s algorithms haven’t created poor search results in the past.

  • Google’s Panda algorithm was designed to get rid of a bias for cookie cutter content.
  • The Reviews System is a patch to fix Google’s bias for content that’s about reviews but aren’t necessarily reviews.

If Google has systems for catching low quality sites that their core algorithm would otherwise rank, why do big brands and poor quality content still rank?

I believe the answer is that is what users prefer to see those sites, as indicated by user interaction signals.

The big question to ask is whether Google will continue to rank what users biases and inexperience trigger user satisfaction signals.  Or will Google continue serving the sugar-frosted bon-bons that users crave?

Should Google make the choice to rank quality content at the risk that users find it too hard to understand?

Or should publishers give up and focus on creating for the lowest common denominator like the biggest popstars do?



Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

SEO

Google Announces Gemma: Laptop-Friendly Open Source AI

Published

on

By

Google Announces Gemma: Laptop-Friendly Open Source AI

Google released an open source large language model based on the technology used to create Gemini that is powerful yet lightweight, optimized to be used in environments with limited resources like on a laptop or cloud infrastructure.

Gemma can be used to create a chatbot, content generation tool and pretty much anything else that a language model can do. This is the tool that SEOs have been waiting for.

It is released in two versions, one with two billion parameters (2B) and another one with seven billion parameters (7B). The number of parameters indicates the model’s complexity and potential capability. Models with more parameters can achieve a better understanding of language and generate more sophisticated responses, but they also require more resources to train and run.

The purpose of releasing Gemma is to democratize access to state of the art Artificial Intelligence that is trained to be safe and responsible out of the box, with a toolkit to further optimize it for safety.

Gemma By DeepMind

The model is developed to be lightweight and efficient which makes it ideal for getting it into the hands of more end users.

Google’s official announcement noted the following key points:

  • “We’re releasing model weights in two sizes: Gemma 2B and Gemma 7B. Each size is released with pre-trained and instruction-tuned variants.
  • A new Responsible Generative AI Toolkit provides guidance and essential tools for creating safer AI applications with Gemma.
  • We’re providing toolchains for inference and supervised fine-tuning (SFT) across all major frameworks: JAX, PyTorch, and TensorFlow through native Keras 3.0.
  • Ready-to-use Colab and Kaggle notebooks, alongside integration with popular tools such as Hugging Face, MaxText, NVIDIA NeMo and TensorRT-LLM, make it easy to get started with Gemma.
  • Pre-trained and instruction-tuned Gemma models can run on your laptop, workstation, or Google Cloud with easy deployment on Vertex AI and Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE).
  • Optimization across multiple AI hardware platforms ensures industry-leading performance, including NVIDIA GPUs and Google Cloud TPUs.
  • Terms of use permit responsible commercial usage and distribution for all organizations, regardless of size.”

Analysis Of Gemma

According to an analysis by an Awni Hannun, a machine learning research scientist at Apple, Gemma is optimized to be highly efficient in a way that makes it suitable for use in low-resource environments.

Hannun observed that Gemma has a vocabulary of 250,000 (250k) tokens versus 32k for comparable models. The importance of that is that Gemma can recognize and process a wider variety of words, allowing it to handle tasks with complex language. His analysis suggests that this extensive vocabulary enhances the model’s versatility across different types of content. He also believes that it may help with math, code and other modalities.

It was also noted that the “embedding weights” are massive (750 million). The embedding weights are a reference to the parameters that help in mapping words to representations of their meanings and relationships.

An important feature he called out is that the embedding weights, which encode detailed information about word meanings and relationships, are used not just in processing input part but also in generating the model’s output. This sharing improves the efficiency of the model by allowing it to better leverage its understanding of language when producing text.

For end users, this means more accurate, relevant, and contextually appropriate responses (content) from the model, which improves its use in conetent generation as well as for chatbots and translations.

He tweeted:

“The vocab is massive compared to other open source models: 250K vs 32k for Mistral 7B

Maybe helps a lot with math / code / other modalities with a heavy tail of symbols.

Also the embedding weights are big (~750M params), so they get shared with the output head.”

In a follow-up tweet he also noted an optimization in training that translates into potentially more accurate and refined model responses, as it enables the model to learn and adapt more effectively during the training phase.

He tweeted:

“The RMS norm weight has a unit offset.

Instead of “x * weight” they do “x * (1 + weight)”.

I assume this is a training optimization. Usually the weight is initialized to 1 but likely they initialize close to 0. Similar to every other parameter.”

He followed up that there are more optimizations in data and training but that those two factors are what especially stood out.

Designed To Be Safe And Responsible

An important key feature is that it is designed from the ground up to be safe which makes it ideal for deploying for use. Training data was filtered to remove personal and sensitive information. Google also used reinforcement learning from human feedback (RLHF) to train the model for responsible behavior.

It was further debugged with manual re-teaming, automated testing and checked for capabilities for unwanted and dangerous activities.

Google also released a toolkit for helping end-users further improve safety:

“We’re also releasing a new Responsible Generative AI Toolkit together with Gemma to help developers and researchers prioritize building safe and responsible AI applications. The toolkit includes:

  • Safety classification: We provide a novel methodology for building robust safety classifiers with minimal examples.
  • Debugging: A model debugging tool helps you investigate Gemma’s behavior and address potential issues.
  • Guidance: You can access best practices for model builders based on Google’s experience in developing and deploying large language models.”

Read Google’s official announcement:

Gemma: Introducing new state-of-the-art open models

Featured Image by Shutterstock/Photo For Everything



Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

Trending

Follow by Email
RSS