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25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOs

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25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOs

ChatGPT is a revolutionary technology that will significantly change how we work.

As a programmer, I initially didn’t believe it could solve advanced tasks, but I was surprised to see how helpful it can be in my daily life.

So, I started playing around with ChatGPT and discovered several ways it could help me – and I think SEO pros and marketers should master it and make it part of their daily working routing as an assistant tool.

Let’s break down examples by niches you can use, such as:

  • Analytics and Data.
  • Digital Marketing.
  • Productivity.
  • Technical SEO.
  • Keyword Research.
  • On-Page SEO.

But before we start, I would like to point out one caveat you have to remember: The data that ChatGPT was trained on is from the third quarter of 2021 and based on what is available on the internet, which may contain misinformation and outdated.

That means fact-checking and revising ChatGPT’s answers are mandatory, so you don’t fall into trap of errors made by the machine.

Examples Of ChatGPT For Analytics And Data

1. Compose Regular Expressions In Analytics Reporting

Regular expressions can be used in composing analytic reports such as Google Search Console (GSC) or Google Analytics (GA).

Regular expressions are one of the most boring tasks I know, and it may really slow down work. For marketers, it is even tougher, as they typically don’t have a technical background.

Let’s look at an example of GSC’s reporting, which supports filtering by regexp (regular expression).

Screenshot of GSC Query Filter by Regexp, January 2023

If you are a marketer with no technical background, you may find it hard to use this feature and limit yourself to the few basic regexps, which you can find by searching dev-related forums.

Now, you have ChatGPT at your disposal.

Just go to ChatGPT and ask:  Compose regular expression which starts with “How To” or “What is” case insensitive using RE2 syntax.

ChatGPT ResponseScreenshot of ChatGPT response, January 2023

Yup!

(?i)^(?:How To|What is)

It got the job done instantly.

Copy and paste the pattern in GSC’s filter field, and you will have all the queries that are candidates to optimize for FAQ or HowTo schema.

GSC reportScreenshot of GSC report, January 2023

Pretty easy, isn’t it?

You can use it to compose regexp for GA reports as well.

For example, let’s say you want to filter a report which has in the URL the words “Samsung” and “phone.”

Just ask ChatGPT: Compose regular expression which contains words “Samsung” and “phone” case insensitive using RE2 syntax.

Just to note, it is important to mention “RE2 syntax” in the command, as Google’s reporting dashboards support that syntax.

2. Compose Complex Spreadsheet Formulas

Everyone works with Excel or Google Sheets at some time.

Spreadsheets are a part of daily work life for many of us. But composing spreadsheet formulas can be arduous, as you must research to find the function name you need and then spend 10 to 15 minutes figuring out how to make it work.

Now, it just takes you a minute to ask ChatGPT with a command like: Google Sheet formula which copies all rows from sheet1 where column "A" contains word "iphone".

And it didn’t take long to get the solution.

Google Sheet Formula ChatGPTScreenshot of Google Sheet Formula created by ChatGPT, January 2023

But, the formula it gave =QUERY(Sheet1!A:Z, "SELECT * WHERE A CONTAINS 'iphone'", "Sheet2!A1") has a small error.

Of course, ChatGPT doesn’t always provide 100% correct answers. You should always check its answers, as you may need to fix them manually.

The formula I got is 99% correct, except that the third parameter shouldn’t be there.

So, I removed it manually and now have =QUERY(Sheet1!A:Z, "SELECT * WHERE A CONTAINS 'iphone'") which works perfectly!

I always recommend using punctuation in ChatGPT to help it better understand the prompt.

For example, use a colon to end the prompt or quotes around any text that isn’t part of the prompt.

3. Composing SQL queries

With the introduction of GA4, marketers may often need to fetch data from BigQuery, as Google now offers a free connection of GA4 to BigQuery.

To query the dataset, you would need to learn SQL – or just ask ChatGPT to build a specific query for you to extract valuable data without sampling from the dataset.

SQL sample using ChatGPTScreenshot of an SQL sample using ChatGPT, January 2023

Examples Of ChatGPT For Digital Marketing

When using ChatGPT for market research and your brand marketing, always remember that it was trained on data up to the third quarter of 2021 and thus may not be the best tool for dealing with current trends.

But it is a handy tool for many other tasks you may have. Let’s take a look at some of them.

4. Generate Audience Personas

Let’s say you’ve launched a new SaaS company and want to know who your audience is so that you can build your marketing efforts around them.

You can ask ChatGPT to create audience personas.

The prompt I would use is Create audience personas for the "physical threat detection software."

Audience persona created by ChatGPTScreenshot of an audience persona created by ChatGPT, January 2023

And the results are just a great place to start.

This doesn’t mean you should fire your marketing leader, but now, they have a tool that can 10x boost their performance and deliver faster results.

5. SWOT Analysis

This is a really cool prompt you can use for your brand or competitive analysis.

You can ask to do a SWOT analysis of any company.

For example, I used the prompt SWOT analysis of "Washington Post" , and the results were a very interesting starting point.

SWOT analysis Screenshot of SWOT analysis by ChatGPT, January 2023

6. S.M.A.R.T. Goals

SMART goals are important because they provide a clear framework for setting and achieving objectives.

With ChatGPT, you can get ideas for your company using the prompt S.M.A.R.T. goals for SaaS "<company name>."

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot of SMART Goals by ChatGPT, January 2023

7. Craft A Newsletter

You can use ChatGPT to craft an outline for the newsletter campaign you want to run.

Let’s say you have a sale on Black Friday and want to send a newsletter to promote your offer.

Just ask, Craft an email campaign newsletter on Black Friday for SaaS "<company name>" which offers 20% discount. Include a catchy call to action button at the end of the email.

Email newsletter generated by ChatGPTScreenshot of an email newsletter generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

Examples Of ChatGPT For Productivity

8. Craft Pitch Emails

Again, if you are a SaaS startup, you definitely need to sell your software.

Your sales team needs to pitch prospective customers and respond to hundreds of emails, which is exhausting and can be a slow process.

Increasing the productivity of your sales team can help you sell more and increase your revenue.

The example prompt you can use here is Craft a pitch email for selling "physical threat detection software."

Pitch email example generated by ChatGPTScreenshot of a pitch email example generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

Alternatively, there is a Chrome add-on that you may use.

9. Craft A Social Media Post

Let’s say you’ve published articles and want to push them to social media.

You would need a well-crafted and compelling text to post on social media so that users will click on your post.

Social media post crafted by ChatGPTScreenshot of social media posts crafted by ChatGPT, January 2023

I bet you would spend at least 15 minutes composing such a compelling social media post. But now, you can do it in one minute.

10. Write Ad Copy

If you are a PPC marketer, you deal a lot with creating ad copy – and having an extra resource to provide you with thought starters could save hundreds of hours a month for you.

The sample prompt I used is Write a Google ad text with a title of up to 30 characters and a description of up to 90 characters for SaaS "physical threat detection software."

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot of an ad copy by ChatGPT, January 2023

You may also include blog post article text from which to generate the ad copy, which will be more specific to you.

The sample prompt would be: Write a Google ad text with a title of up to 30 characters and a description of up to 90 characters for SaaS "<company type>" from the text below.

Just replace the prompt with the company type with your version.

11. Craft A Job Description

All companies need to hire, meaning they must write job descriptions.

Now, ChatGPT can help with that, too.

For example, Job description of Social Media Manager for real estate company.

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot of a job description generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

Always remember you can finetune the prompt by adding more details to it, which will make the answer even better.

Examples Of ChatGPT For Technical SEO

12. Generate FAQ Schema

You can have ChatGPT generate FAQ schema code from a text you provide.

FAQ schema generated by ChatGPTScreenshot of an FAQ schema generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

Of course, you may use a CMS plugin for that, too.

But what if you use Wix, for example, which doesn’t have a plugin? Should you copy and paste schema code into the editor? In this case, ChatGPT is a handy tool and assistant at your disposal.

You can generate any kind of schema by using a similar example.

13. Generate HowTo Schema

In the case of the HowTo schema, you can enter a similar prompt as we did for FAQ, and ChatGPT will do 99% of the job.

The prompt would be,Generate HowTo schema on how to bake a cake from the steps below and suggest images with each step.

HowTo schema generated by ChatGPTScreenshot of a HowTo schema generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

Why 99% and not 100%? Simply because you need to replace sample image URLs.

It did, however, add HowTo schema steps with real images.

Just upload images in your CMS and replace the sample image path in the suggested schema.

14. Create Robots.txt Rules

SEO pros deal with robots.txt a lot.

Now you have a tool that can help you create any robots.txt rules with ease.

Below is an example of how to prevent Google from crawling your PPC campaign landing pages, which are located in directory /landing/but let Google ads bot in.

The prompt you can use is Robots.txt rule which blocks Google's access to directory /landing/ but allows Google ads bot.

Robots.txt rule created by ChatGPTScreenshot of a robots.txt rule created by ChatGPT, January 2023

After you’ve done edits, always test your robots.txt.

15. Generate htaccess Redirect Rules

SEO pros often deal with migrations and may need to redirect a lot of stuff, depending on what type of server one has.

You can now generate htaccess or Nginx redirect rules using ChatGPT.

The prompt I used is For redirecting folder1 to folder2 generate nxig and htaccess redirect rules,

The results are just neat.

Python script generated by ChatGPTScreenshot of a Python script generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

16. Connect To APIs And Coding

SEO pros often need to connect to various APIs and fetch data, but may lack programming skills.

Now you have ChatGPT at your disposal for basic tasks which require programming.

In the example below, I asked ChatGPT to get Google autosuggestion using the known “pytrends” library.

Python script generated by ChatGPTScreenshot of a Python script generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

You can basically use ChatGPT for coding in all programming languages.

The same prompt may be composed to ask the same, but in PHP: Get Google Keyword Suggestions using PHP.

For running PHP on your local machine, you may use the free environment XAMPP; for running Python, you may use Jupiter.

If you are a PPC marketer who wants to set up custom conversions when users perform certain actions on the website but don’t have a web developer’s help, it could be quite challenging in some situations.

Yes, you can use Google Tag Manager in many cases when users click on the link, but you could need something different, which is not a built-in feature of GTM.

For example, you need to send a conversion event when one lands on your landing page and scrolls through 35% of the page.

Now, you don’t need to hire a developer to get the job done.

Just go to ChatGPT and ask: Send Facebook pixel custom conversion event once as users scroll through 35% of the page using JavaScript, and it will do the magic!

JavaScript code firing custom facebook pixel eventScreenshot of JavaScript code firing custom Facebook pixel event, January 2023

You can copy and paste this code in your <head> tag of HTML, and you are done.

If you have a WordPress site, you can use plugins such WPCode to make the job easier.

Alternatively, you can use Google Tag Manager custom HTML tag to add your JavaScript code there.

It saves you the time of having to find a developer for small daily tasks. And even if you do have a dev team, you can significantly reduce their workload by doing it yourself.

Examples Of ChatGPT For Keyword Research

17. Get Keyword Ideas

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot of long-tail keywords generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

An example prompt you can use is Generate a list of long  and short tail keyword ideas on the topic “machine learning.”

Now SEO tools have a serious competitor that’s free to use.

The only caveat is that, as I’ve mentioned already, ChatGPT is trained on data up to the third quarter of 2021 and isn’t connected to the internet. Thus, it may fail to work in cases when you need more recent data.

For example, I asked who won Fifa 2022 World Cup, and it failed to answer.

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot from ChatGPT, January 2023

18. Get The Search Intent Of The Search Query

You have a lot of data in your GSC, which now you can copy and paste into ChatGPT to get more insights.

For example, you can copy-paste a list of search queries and ask for the intent of the query using the prompt What is the user intent behind these queries?.

Search intent generated by ChatGPTScreenshot of a search intent generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

19. Cluster Semantically Relevant Keywords

Again, you can use ChatGPT to organize the keywords you rank for – and not only those – into clusters: Cluster list of keywords based on their semantic relevance.

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot of ChatGPT, January 2023

Another case is to identify pages that rank for semantically relevant queries and restructure your URLs under silos.

For example, bring all pages that are about social media or under /social-media/ silo, which can help you boost ranking and help Google better understand your website structure.

20. Generate Related Keywords And Synonyms

It is always good to mention your content-related keywords and synonyms.

You can do it at scale by using ChatGPT.

Just ask:Generate related keywords or the list of keywords below.

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot from ChatGPT, January 2023

21. Generate Article Titles Based On Keywords

As you have keywords you want to write articles about, it is time to brainstorm titles for your articles.

The prompt I used is Suggest titles based on keywords list below.

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot from ChatGPT, January 2023

Examples Of ChatGPT For On-Page SEO

22. Generate Meta Descriptions

You can copy and paste text into ChatGPT and ask it to create a meta description from it.

The prompt I used is Generate concise and compelling meta description of up to 200 characters from the provided text.

Meta description generated by ChatGPTScreenshot of a meta description generated by ChatGPT, January 2023

23. Optimize For PAA Box And Featured Snippets

SEO professionals may need help getting related questions from users to optimize content for a specific keyword.

You can use ChatGPT to get these related questions to make your content more helpful.

If you have a travel blog, you may ask: Related questions regarding "cozy cities in Germany," and ChatGPT will draw many queries which really make sense.

ChatGPT Keyword ResearchScreenshot of ChatGPT performing keyword research, January 2023

Of course, there may be ones that don’t make sense – but they will do 90% of the job.

The questions it suggests may not have any search volume, but it is still worth going after them because zero search volume keywords may drive significant traffic.

24. Generate FAQ For The Product With Answers

If you have an ecommerce store and want to enhance your product pages with an FAQ section, you can ask ChatGPT to help you.

The example prompt I used is Generate FAQ for the Galaxy A23 5G with answers. Based on the results generate also FAQ schema.

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot of ChatGPT generating FAQ for a product, January 2023

And you can shoot two rabbits with one shot, as you will also get an FAQ schema you can use.

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot of ChatGPT generating an FAQ schema, January 2023

Pretty simple, isn’t it?

If you worry about being penalized by Google for AI-written content, I think you are okay as long as you fact-check and revise it for errors.

But I am strictly against generating full article copy using ChatGPT because you must fact-check it and likely spend more time revising it than writing from scratch. With the rise of AI detectors, Google may eventually be able to detect it.

Treat ChatGPT as an assistant that you can use wisely when you next an extra hand.

25. Suggest Heading Tags

Let’s say you have a big chunk of text and want to get ideas about what subheadings to add to make your content more structured.

You can ask ChatGPT to do that time-consuming editorial task for you just by asking, Suggest H2 subheadings to content below without modifying the text.

25 ChatGPT Examples For Digital Marketers & SEOsScreenshot of ChatGPT generating subheadings, January 2023

Of course, it might not always offer exactly what you wanted, but you may play with the prompt and add more context to it – or take ChatGPT hints and work from there by adding your edits to subheadings.

Conclusion

There are talks that ChatGPT is going to replace humans, and many professions are just going to die out.

In my personal opinion, that won’t happen – but ChatGPT will make life easier in different industries and professional fields.

Make sure also to check out the AIRPM Chrome add-on, as it contains tons of useful prompts you can use.


Have you got an example of using ChatGPT? Share with us on Twitter and we might feature you.

More Resources:


Featured Image: LALAKA/Shutterstock



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Do Higher Content Scores Mean Higher Google Rankings? Our Data Says It’s Unlikely.

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Do Higher Content Scores Mean Higher Google Rankings? Our Data Says It's Unlikely.

I studied the correlation between rankings and content scores from four popular content optimization tools: Clearscope, Surfer, MarketMuse, and Frase. The result? Weak correlations all around.

This suggests (correlation does not necessarily imply causation!) that obsessing over your content score is unlikely to lead to significantly higher Google rankings.

Does that mean content optimization scores are pointless?

No. You just need to know how best to use them and understand their flaws.

Most tools’ content scores are based on keywords. If top-ranking pages mention keywords your page doesn’t, your score will be low. If it does, your score will be high.

While this has its obvious flaws (having more keyword mentions doesn’t always mean better topic coverage), content scores can at least give some indication of how comprehensively you’re covering the topic. This is something Google is looking for.

Google says that comprehensively covering the topic is a sign of quality contentGoogle says that comprehensively covering the topic is a sign of quality content

If your page’s score is significantly lower than the scores of competing pages, you’re probably missing important subtopics that searchers care about. Filling these “content gaps” might help improve your rankings.

However, there’s nuance to this. If competing pages score in the 80-85 range while your page scores 79, it likely isn’t worth worrying about. But if it’s 95 vs. 20 then yeah, you should probably try to cover the topic better.

Key takeaway

Don’t obsess over content scores. Use them as a barometer for topic coverage. If your score is significantly lower than competitors, you’re probably missing important subtopics and might rank higher by filling those “content gaps.”

There are at least two downsides you should be aware of when it comes to content scores.

They’re easy to cheat

Content scores tend to be largely based on how many times you use the recommended set of keywords. In some tools, you can literally copy-paste the entire list, draft nothing else, and get an almost perfect score.

Scoring 98 on MarketMuse after shoehorning all the suggested keywords without any semblance of a draftScoring 98 on MarketMuse after shoehorning all the suggested keywords without any semblance of a draft

This is something we aim to solve with our upcoming content optimization tool: Content Master.

I can’t reveal too much about this yet, but it has a big USP compared to most existing content optimization tools: its content score is based on topic coverage—not just keywords.

For example, it tells us that our SEO strategy template should better cover subtopics like keyword research, on-page SEO, and measuring and tracking SEO success.

Preview of our upcoming Content Master toolPreview of our upcoming Content Master tool

But, unlike other content optimization tools, lazily copying and pasting related keywords into the document won’t necessarily increase our content score. It’s smart enough to understand that keyword coverage and topic coverage are different things.

Sidenote.

This tool is still in production so the final release may look a little different.

They encourage copycat content

Content scores tell you how well you’re covering the topic based on what’s already out there. If you cover all important keywords and subtopics from the top-ranking pages and create the ultimate copycat content, you’ll score full marks.

This is a problem because quality content should bring something new to the table, not just rehash existing information. Google literally says this in their helpful content guidelines.

Google says quality content goes beyond obvious information. It needs to bring something new to the tableGoogle says quality content goes beyond obvious information. It needs to bring something new to the table

In fact, Google even filed a patent some years back to identify ‘information gain’: a measurement of the new information provided by a given article, over and above the information present in other articles on the same topic.

You can’t rely on content optimization tools or scores to create something unique. Making something that stands out from the rest of the search results will require experience, experimentation, or effort—something only humans can have/do.

Enrich common knowledge with new information and experiences in your contentEnrich common knowledge with new information and experiences in your content

Big thanks to my colleagues Si Quan and Calvinn who did the heavy lifting for this study. Nerd notes below. 😉

  • For the study, we selected 20 random keywords and pulled the top 20 ranking pages.
  • We pulled the SERPs before the March 2024 update was rolled out.
  • Some of the tools had issues pulling the top 20 pages, which we suspect was due to SERP features.
  • Clearscope didn’t give numerical scores; they opted for grades. We used ChatGPT to convert those grades into numbers.
  • Despite their increasing prominence in the SERPs, most of the tools had trouble analyzing Reddit, Quora, and YouTube. They typically gave a zero or no score for these results. If they gave no scores, we excluded them from the analysis.
  • The reason why we calculated both Spearman and Kendall correlations (and took the average) is because according to Calvinn (our Data Scientist), Spearman correlations are more sensitive and therefore more prone to being swayed by small sample size and outliers. On the other hand, the Kendall rank correlation coefficient only takes order into account. So, it is more robust for small sample sizes and less sensitive to outliers.

Final thoughts

Improving your content score is unlikely to hurt Google rankings. After all, although the correlation between scores and rankings is weak, it’s still positive. Just don’t obsess and spend hours trying to get a perfect score; scoring in the same ballpark as top-ranking pages is enough.

You also need to be aware of their downsides, most notably that they can’t help you craft unique content. That requires human creativity and effort.

Any questions or comments? Ping me on X or LinkedIn.



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Unlocking Brand Growth: Strategies for B2B and E-commerce Marketers

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Unlocking Brand Growth: Strategies for B2B and E-commerce Marketers

In today’s fast-paced digital landscape, scaling a brand effectively requires more than just an innovative product or service. For B2B and e-commerce marketers, understanding the intricacies of growth strategies across different stages of business development is crucial.  

A recent analysis of 71 brands offers valuable insights into the optimal strategies for startups, scaleups, mature brands, and majority offline businesses. Here’s what we learned. 

Startup Stage: Building the Foundation 

Key Strategy: Startups focus on impressions-driven channels like Paid Social to establish their audience base. This approach is essential for gaining visibility and creating a strong initial footprint in the market. 

Case Study: Pooch & Mutt exemplified this strategy by leveraging Paid Social to achieve significant year-on-year revenue gains while also improving acquisition costs. This foundational step is crucial for setting the stage for future growth and stability. 

Scaleup Stage: Accelerating Conversion 

Key Strategy: For scaleups, having already established an audience, the focus shifts to conversion activities. Increasing spend in impressions-led media helps continue generating demand while maintaining a balance with acquisition costs. 

Case Study: The Essence Vault successfully applied this approach, scaling their Meta presence while minimizing cost increases. This stage emphasizes the importance of efficient spending to maximize conversion rates and sustain growth momentum. 

Mature Stage: Expanding Horizons 

Key Strategy: Mature brands invest in higher funnel activities to avoid market saturation and explore international expansion opportunities. This strategic pivot ensures sustained growth and market diversification. 

Case Study: Represent scaled their efforts on TikTok, enhancing growth and improving Meta efficiency. By expanding their presence in the US, they exemplified how mature brands can navigate saturation and seek new markets for continued success. 

Majority Offline Brands: Embracing Digital Channels 

Key Strategy: Majority offline brands primarily invest in click-based channels like Performance Max. However, the analysis reveals significant opportunities in Paid Social, suggesting a balanced approach for optimal results. 

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How To Use The Google Ads Search Terms Report

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How To Use The Google Ads Search Terms Report

One of the most essential aspects of a profitable Google Ads strategy is reaching the right people, with the right message, while they’re searching.

To do this correctly, you need to know exactly how your ads are doing and what words potential customers are using to search.

This is where the Google Ads search terms report comes in handy.

This report is a goldmine and an invaluable asset to every Google Ads account.

With insights into exact phrases being used to trigger your ads, the search terms report can help:

  • Significantly refine your keyword strategy.
  • Enhance your targeting.
  • Boost your return on investment (ROI).

Let’s get into why the Google Ads search terms report is not only helpful but essential for maximizing Google Ads profitability.

What Is The Google Ads Search Terms Report?

The search terms report is a performance tool that shows how your ad performed when triggered by actual searches on the Google Search Network.

The report shows specific terms and phrases that triggered your ad to show, which helps determine if you’re bidding on the right keywords or using the right match types.

If you find search terms that aren’t relevant for your business, you can easily add them to your negative keyword list repository.

This helps you spend your budget more effectively by ensuring your ads are only triggered for relevant, useful searches by potential customers.

Keep in mind that there is a difference between a search term and a keyword:

  • Search term: Shows the exact word or phrase a customer enters on the Google Search Network to trigger an ad.
  • Keyword: The word or phrase that Google Ads advertisers target and bid on to show their ads to customers.

How To Create A Search Terms Report

Creating a search terms report in your Google Ads account is simple, and better yet – it can be automated!

To view your search terms report, you’ll need to:

  • Log into your Google Ads account.
  • Navigate to “Campaigns” >> “Insights & reports” >> “Search terms”

Below is an example of where to navigate in your Google Ads account to find the search terms report.

Screenshot taken by author, April 2024

After running this report, there are multiple actions you can take as a marketer:

  • Add top-performing searches to corresponding ad groups as keywords.
  • Select the desired match type (e.g. broad, phrase, exact) if adding new keywords.
  • Add irrelevant search terms to a negative keyword list.

3 Ways To Use Search Terms Report Data

As mentioned above, there are numerous ways you can use the search terms report data to optimize campaign performance.

Let’s take a look at three examples of how to use this report to get the best bang for your buck.

1. Refine Existing Keyword Lists

The first area the search terms report can help with is refining existing keyword lists.

By combing through the search terms report, you can find areas of opportunities, including:

  • What searches are leading to conversions.
  • What searches are irrelevant to the product or service.
  • What searches have high impressions but low clicks.
  • How searches are being mapped to existing keywords and ad groups.

For searches leading to conversions, it likely makes sense to add those as keywords to an existing ad group or create a new ad group.

If you’re finding some searches to be irrelevant to what you’re selling, it’s best to add them as negative keywords. That prevents your ad from showing up for that search moving forward.

If some searches have a high volume of impressions, but very few clicks, these will take further consideration. If it’s a keyword worth bidding on, it may indicate that the bid strategy isn’t competitive enough – meaning you’ll have to take action on your bid strategy.

If a search term is being triggered by multiple keywords and ad groups, this is a case of cross-pollution of keywords. This can lead to lower ROI because it’s essentially having multiple keywords bid on that search term, which can drive up the cost. If this happens, you have a few options:

  • Review and update existing keyword match types as necessary.
  • Add negative keywords where appropriate at the ad group or campaign level to avoid cross-pollution.

Ultimately, using the search terms report in this way allows you to determine what is performing well and eliminate poor performers.

2. Understand How Your Audience Is Actually Searching For Your Product

Something I often see is a mismatch of how a company talks about its product or service vs. how a customer is actually searching for it in the real world.

If you’re bidding on keywords you think describe your product or service but are not getting any traction, you could be misaligning expectations.

Oftentimes, searches that lead to conversions are from terms you wouldn’t have thought to bid on without looking at the search terms report.

One of this report’s most underutilized use cases is finding lesser-known ways customers are searching for and finding your product.

Finding these types of keywords may result in the creation of a new campaign, especially if the search terms don’t fit existing ad group structures.

Building out campaigns by different search themes allows for appropriate bidding strategies for each because not all keyword values are created equal!

Understanding how a customer is describing their need for a product or service not only helps your keyword strategy but can lead to better-aligned product positioning.

This leads us to a third way the search term report can help your campaigns.

3. Optimize Ad Copy and Landing Pages

As discussed in #2, customers’ language and phrases can provide valuable insights into their needs and preferences.

Marketers can use the search terms report to better tailor ad copy, making it more relevant and appealing to prospective customers.

And let’s not forget about the corresponding landing page!

Once a user clicks on an ad, they expect to see an alignment of what they searched for and what is presented on a website.

Make sure that landing page content is updated regularly to better match the searcher’s intent.

This can result in a better user experience and an improvement in conversion rates.

How Using The Search Terms Report Can Help ROI

All three examples above are ways that the search terms report can improve campaign ROI.

How so?

Let’s take a look at each example further.

How Refining Keywords Helps ROI

Part of refining existing keywords is negating any irrelevant search terms that trigger an ad.

Having a solid negative keyword strategy gets rid of “unwanted” spending on keywords that don’t make sense.

That previously “wasted” spend then gets redirected to campaigns that regularly drive higher ROI.

Additionally, adding top-performing search terms gives you better control from a bid strategy perspective.

Being able to pull the appropriate levers and setting proper bid strategies by search theme ultimately leads to better ROI.

How Understanding Audience Intent Helps ROI

By understanding the exact language and search terms that potential customers use, marketers can update ad copy and landing pages to better match those searches.

This can increase ad relevance and Ad Rank within Google Ads.

These items help with keyword Quality Score, which can help reduce CPCs as your Quality Score increases.

More relevant ads likely lead to higher click-through rates, which leads to a higher likelihood of converting those users!

How Updating Ad Copy And Landing Pages Helps ROI

This example goes hand-in-hand with the above recommendation.

As you start to better understand the audience’s search intent, updating ad copy and landing pages to reflect their search indicates better ad relevance.

Once a user clicks on that relevant ad, they find the content of the landing page matches better to what they’re looking for.

This enhanced relevance can significantly increase the likelihood of conversion, which ultimately boosts ROI.

Use This Report To Make Data-Driven Decisions

Google Ads is an integral part of any digital marketing strategy, often accounting for a large portion of your marketing budget.

By regularly reviewing the search terms report, you can refine your marketing budget to make your Google Ads campaigns more effective.

Using this report to make data-driven decisions that fine-tune multiple facets of campaign management leads to more effective ad spending, higher conversions, and ultimately higher ROI.

More resources: 


Featured Image: FGC/Shutterstock

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