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39 Inspiring Examples of Contact Us Pages

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39 Inspiring Examples of Contact Us Pages

Most contact pages are designed with function in mind.

They slap an email address, phone, and location on a plain background and call it a day.

But basic contact pages don’t inspire visitors to reach out and connect.

Other pages make it easy to contact the company – which is awesome.

Except, that can also drive up customer service costs.

So what makes the perfect Contact Us page?

An awesome Contact Us page finds just the right balance between making it easy to reach the company and sharing resources users can use to answer their questions right away.

Keep reading to discover 39 examples of Contact Us pages that go beyond the basics and will, hopefully, inspire you to take your site to the next level.

39 Awesome Contact Us Page Examples You Need to See

1. Broker Notes

At first glance, Broker Notes‘ contact page looks pretty bare.

There’s no graphics, no quirky copy, just a plain old contact form.

Great for UX, but not so great for inspiring users to reach out.

So what stands out on this page?

The drop-down menu under “How can we help you?” lets users share the reason they are contacting the site.

This makes it easier to sort through requests and respond to important contacts as soon as possible.

For example, if you select “I am a broker looking to advertise on Broker Notes,” it takes you to another form to share more information about your firm.

The little bar at the bottom lets you know how much time is left in the form, so users are less likely to get annoyed.

2. Sleeknote

Sleeknote uses a similar format to Broker Notes – they ask how they can help and provide links to book a demo or become a partner.

If the user needs something else, they are invited to fill out the contact form.

contact us page sleeknote

Another feature that stands out is Sleeknote’s live chat option, where users can reach out to learn more about what they offer or ask questions.

Making it easy to find information serves two purposes. It:

  • Helps the customer find what they need.
  • Reduces the number of contacts the brand has to manage.

In other words, it’s a win-win.

3. Yeti

Yeti‘s contact us page stands out for several reasons.

First, they offer a beautiful (and on-brand) photo background. It is striking without drawing away from the copy.

The copy is a bit cheeky, “While we’re good with smoke signals, there are simpler ways for us to get in touch.”

contact us page yeti

Below the fold, Yeti offers a range of resources, including product FAQs, info on warranties, and links to check gift card balances.

But they also don’t bury the contact info, which would just frustrate users.

Clicking on the “Send us an email” button takes you right to the contact form.

It’s easy to find but not too easy to find. (Which also helps keep away those pesky bots.)

4. BrightLocal

BrightLocal keeps their contact page simple but personalizes it with the names and faces of their support team.

This helps users feel like they are connecting with real people, not just a faceless brand.

contact us page brightlocal

They also ask if users are a current customer, which lets them provide better service by understanding whether a contact is likely to have a question or need service.

5. RedBull

There’s a lot to love about RedBull‘s website, but their contact page really stands out.

Like Yeti, they use a striking image in the background.

They also provide a category drop-down so users can share what they need help with.

contact us page redbull

Just below the standard contact form, they provide a special form just for Press members, which is a nice touch (and likely cuts down on the number of press requests they get through their regular contact form!)

6. Chipotle

Chipotle‘s contact page starts off strong with a casual tone that fits with their corporate branding: “You’ve got questions, we’ve got answers on anything Chipotle.”

The page then offers an expansive list of FAQs (which, again, helps keep those contacts to a minimum).

contact us page chipotle

There are two things I really love about this page.

First, they get all up in your face to let you know that response times are longer than normal.

Yay for setting expectations.

But they also have a chatbot that helps people navigate the FAQs.

Chipotle strikes the perfect balance between limiting the number of emails and still providing great customer service.

7. MeUndies

If fun undies are your jam, then you’ll want to check out MeUndies.

The brand offers a fun vibe, and it shows on their contact us page.

Like most other brands, they try to steer users to their help center first.

contact us page me undies

Can’t find what you need?

They make it easy to reach out to their “CheekSquad” by chat, email, text, or social.

contact us page me undies 2

8. Podia

How many times have you reached out to customer support and spent days waiting for a response?

Podia starts out by highlighting their short wait time, which is really smart – especially as many people are working remotely these days.

contact us page podia

They also share live chat hours and pictures of their support team to remind customers they’ll be talking to a real live person.

contact us page podia 2

9. The Middle Finger Project

If you are looking for a book about getting unstuck and ridding yourself of imposter syndrome, I can’t recommend this book enough.

But, we’re here to talk about contact pages.

So, here’s The Middle Finger Project’s contact page:

contact us page tmfp

Form-wise, it’s not super exciting, right?

But I love the cheeky language and “What I really want to say is…” and the send button:

contact us page tmfp 2

I’m not sure what the average speed of a pack of wolves is, but it sounds good.

Who said contact pages had to be boring, anyway?

10. Brands to life

Brands to life is an Australian-based branding and creative agency that helps, well, bring brands to life.

They have a unique brand that is simple and straightforward.

Their contact page includes all the standard information — name, location, email, and so forth.

contact us page brands to life

The page feels plain, but it fits with the rest of their site and their overall branding, which lets the user know who the brand is and what they can expect.

This just goes to show that contact pages don’t have to be fancy – especially if your brand’s personality is simple.

11. Kick Point

Kick Point does a great job of weeding out people they don’t want to work with right from the start – “Don’t address your email to us “Dear Sirs.” is a pretty strong statement to have top and center on your contact form!

contact us page kick point

A bit further down the contact page, the team shares how long they take to respond.

It’s all relatable and on-brand.

I dig it.

12. Leeds Golf Centre

What does a golf course have to teach us about creating an awesome contact page?

First, they make it easy to book online, which is likely the main reason folks head to their website.

Smart.

contact us page leeds golf centre

A bit further down they list all their contact info – phone, email, even fax.

But what really stands out is their contact form, which features a nifty little checkbox for folks to sign up for their newsletter.

contact us page leeds golf centre

Users have to check the box – they aren’t being sneaky – but it’s an easy way to increase newsletter sign-ups.

13. Nebular

Nebular is a U.S.-based digital development agency.

Their website is bold and loud, and their contact page sticks to that theme.

contact us page nebular

The self-deprecating humor shows off who they are as a business in just a few lines and the bold colors are carried over from the rest of the site.

Simple, but effective.

14. Basecamp

Who is on the other end of that contact form?

With some companies, you’ll never know.

Basecamp, however, shows off their teams smiling (though drawn) faces right at the top of the contact form.

contact us page basecamp

They also include links to sign up, learn more about their offerings, and pricing.

As a result, their contact page feels welcoming and easy to use.

15. ConvertKit

ConvertKit is known for its automated email service tools designed to help customers get the most out of their marketing.

Their contact page highlights one of their main goals – customer success.

contact us page convertkit

Just below the hero image, customers can click to visit the knowledge base, reach out to support, or learn the basics in their workshops.

And, like many other brands, they offer live chat right on the contact page which can help reduce customer frustration by helping them find the info they need right away.

16. Moon Pie

Moon Pie has one of my favorite brand Twitter accounts (seriously, check it out), so I was going to go check out their contact page for this list.

Sadly, there was none of the tongue in cheek charm to be found on their contact page, but it is incredibly well laid out.

For starters, they offer easy links to call or contact each of the brand’s locations — and show where to place wholesale orders.

contact us page moon pie

A bit further down they share FAQs such as “Where can I find MoonPies in my area.” and “Are MoonPies kosher?”

Only after sharing that information do they give you a contact form.

The contact form isn’t hidden at all – but they sure do everything they can to answer your questions before giving you the contact form.

17. Taco Bell

Here’s another brand known for its snarky social presence.

Like MoonPies, Taco Bell keeps it direct but casual on their contact page.

They ask for contact information and try to direct users to their FAQ pages first.

contact us page tacobell

What really stands out is Taco Bell lets customers choose how to get a response – including an option for “No reply needed.”

This makes me feel like there’s a good chance they’ll actually respond to me.

18. Focus Lab

Here’s the thing – contact pages need to be functional.

If you get too crazy with the design, you might just end up frustrating users.

But, just because it has to work doesn’t mean it can’t be creative.

Focus Lab created this awesome interactive contact form that allows users to share their name, needs, and budget (which is critical for client work).

contact us page focus lab

It is unique, which is part of its brand appeal.

And if the form feels like too much, you can scroll down just a bit further to find their email, location, and social accounts.

19. 99Designs

Contact pages often end up as a catch-all box – which can be time-consuming to sort through.

99Designs solves that problem by separating requests based on need with one link for help requests and a separate page for PR inquiries.

contact us page 99designs

If your support times are way down, it might be worth looking for ways to segment your contact form into separate inboxes.

20. Freshbooks

Freshbooks use their contact page to drive home one of their selling points – great customer support.

They don’t offer an email support form, but rather encourage customers to call and talk to a real, live person.

contact us page freshbooks

In a world of chatbots and email forms, this is pretty refreshing!

They also highlight what they offer and invite users to learn more about everything their software has to offer.

It’s almost a half landing page/half contact page.  And if you expect a lot of non-customers will end up on your contact page, this is a good strategy.

22. Five

Now, I may be partial to Five’s contact us page (full disclosure: I’ve worked with them in the past), but I’m obsessed with its drop-down feature from the main navigation.

contact us page five

As you hover over the navigation at the top, this drop-down appears on every page of the website, making it easy for users to ask questions wherever they are on the site.

23. Xbox

My favorite piece of the Xbox contact page is the “Disability answer desk.”

I have yet to see another company add this feature to their contact us page.

contact us page xbox

As accessibility grows in importance for SEO, I’m hoping we will start to see more brands feature these types of contact options.

Thanks for leading the charge, Xbox!

24. Zendesk

Zendesk is giving us Matrix-style vibes with their choice to choose between speaking with a sales member or browsing the help center.

Will you take the red pill or the blue pill?

contact us page zendesk

This is a common practice I’m beginning to see trending in the SaaS space.

As companies reduce overhead or work with minimum employees, they are forcing you to find the answer yourself within the help center.

But, if you want to buy, you have the opportunity to speak to a human.

25. Dollar Shave Club

While I was hoping for a unicorn or some sort of sarcasm while scanning Dollar Shave Club’s contact page, I was pleasantly surprised to find this interactive contact us page.

Contact us page dollar shave club

Dollar Shave Club merges the help center with their contact us page based on your query.

26. Kinsta

Kinsta, a premium WordPress hosting company, is one of my personal favorite WordPress hosting companies.

Mostly because I’ve seen page speed triple its performance after migrating to Kinsta.

contact us page kinsta

But, Kinsta’s WordPress hosting isn’t the only thing I’m in love with.

Kinsta’s contact page answers questions directly while providing a direct email address and live chat.

Full disclosure: I have provided copywriting services for Kinsta in the past. 

27. Swab the World

Swab the World is becoming one of my favorite websites, mostly for its quirky copy.

You can see in Swab the World’s contact page, they convey their conversational tone even in the minimal copy on the page.

Contact us pages swab the world

Plus, I love the shout out to snail mail. Does anyone still love getting snail mail? 🙋‍♀️

28. Shopify

Shopify serves up a friendly contact us page with a warm welcoming smile in the visuals.

More importantly, Shopify breaks down the sections of support you may need.

contact us page Shopify

Shopify highlights its community forums, help center, and contact information for support.

Notice the arrangement?

It’s signaling to users to seek help from the forum, then the help center, until finally, you need support from a human.

29. Trello

Similar to Shopify, Trello calls out their Trello Community to help users gain support.

As more customers begin to use your services or product, it’s helpful to provide additional support from other users who may have experienced the same issue.

contact us page trello

Still, when all else fails, users are able to contact Trello’s support team directly.

30. PayPal

PayPal’s customer service identifies the common queries it receives with its contact us page.

You can see below PayPal highlights issues with passwords, payments, donations, disputes, etc.

contact us page paypal

However, if you are still unable to find a solution, PayPal shares additional links to help its users find their answers quickly.

32. Ben & Jerry’s

While Ben & Jerry’s is one of my favorite ice cream brands (shout out to Phish Food lovers!), Ben & Jerry’s website design and copy have always been on the top of my list.

contact us page ben & jerrys

Again, similar to PayPal, Ben & Jerry’s provides an FAQ section with the most common questions asked to help speed up the response time.

33. Friends

The crew at Friends stays true to its brand with the monotone colors and playful copy.

contact us friends agency

As you continue to scroll down the contact us page, Friends shares a peek inside its multiple offices to give potential clients insight into what daily life is like at Friends.

contact us pages friends 2

34. Bite Size Entertainment

Bite Size Entertainment took an interesting spin on its contact us page.

Instead of including a form, they use an interactive map embed to highlight restaurants, bars, and coffee shops near its office.

contact us pages bite size Bite Size Entertainment shows its personality by using inspiring copy like “your future dream job,” and getting personal with “talk over coffee.”

Even on its contact us page, the conversational tone is carried throughout the website.

35. Poo-Pourri

After listening to a podcast with Suzy Batiz a few years back, I’ve been a big fan of the Poo-Pourri copy.

They play directly into their target audience as you can see in the live chat, “Tell us a bit about your stinkin’ self.”

contact us pages poo pourri

36. Squatty Potty

Squatty Potty became a big deal after it’s premiere on Shark Tank and this YouTube commercial that went viral.

But, Squatty Potty’s unique sense of humor and love for 💩 isn’t the only thing I love about this brand.

Squatty Potty’s contact us page is one you’ll want to take a peek at.

 

contact us pages squatty potty

Not only does Squatty Potty provide a contact form, but they include an organized FAQ section below to help answer your questions faster.

contact us pages squatty potty 2

37. Velocity

Velocity is a B2B marketing agency that has been making me chuckle with its website copy for years.

It plays into its own services by acknowledging that if you land on this page, you’re in the “later stages of the B2B purchase journey.”

contact us page velocity

If you’re an SEO professional, you’ll love the way Velocity added directions to its offices sending tons of local signals to the SERPs by acknowledging specific train stations, cinemas, bridges, and more.

contact us page velocity

38. Ann Handley

Ann Handley has long been a fan favorite of the Search Engine Journal team.

But we’re not just fans of Ann’s storytelling.

Her contact us page nails it again.

contact us pages ann handley

After Ann charms you with her copy above, she dives into specifics on how to email her to get a quicker response.

contact us pages ann handley

 

39. Pit Viper Sunglasses

I have to admit, I bought a pair of these sunglasses based only on the website design and copy of Pit Vipers.

Between its borderline rude and snarky website copy and use of comic sans font, it’s difficult as an SEO nerd to not want to buy from this site.

contact us pit vipers

Contact Us Pages Are the Tattoos of Your Site

It’s sad but true, contact us pages are the tattoos of your website.

You know they are there, but you probably forgot to take care of them and touch them up.

Contact pages need to put function first. But, as these examples show, contact pages don’t have to be boring.

Don’t be afraid to make your page fun with beautiful photos, interactive elements, and quirky copywriting that show off your brand’s personality.

More Resources:


Image Credits

Featured Image: Created by author, September 2020
All screenshots taken by author, September 2020



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Google Documents Leaked & SEOs Are Making Some Wild Assumptions

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Google Documents Leaked & SEOs Are Making Some Wild Assumptions

You’ve probably heard about the recent Google documents leak. It’s on every major site and all over social media.

Where did the docs come from?

My understanding is that a bot called yoshi-code-bot leaked docs related to the Content API Warehouse on Github on March 13th, 2024. It may have appeared earlier in some other repos, but this is the one that was first discovered.

They were discovered by an anonymous ex-Googler who shared the info with Erfan Azimi who shared it with Rand Fishkin who shared it with Mike King. The docs were removed on May 7th.

I appreciate all involved for sharing their findings with the community.

Google’s response

There was some debate if the documents were real or not, but they mention a lot of internal systems and link to internal documentation and it definitely appears to be real.

A Google spokesperson released the following statement to Search Engine Land:

We would caution against making inaccurate assumptions about Search based on out-of-context, outdated, or incomplete information. We’ve shared extensive information about how Search works and the types of factors that our systems weigh, while also working to protect the integrity of our results from manipulation.

SEOs interpret things based on their own experiences and bias

Many SEOs are saying that the ranking factors leaked. I haven’t seen any code or weights, just what appear to be descriptions and storage info. Unless one of the descriptions says the item is used for ranking, I think it’s dangerous for SEOs that all of these are used in ranking.

Having some features or information stored does not mean they’re used in ranking. For our search engine, Yep.com, we have all kinds of things stored that might be used for crawling, indexing, ranking, personalization, testing, or feedback. We even have things stored that we aren’t doing things with yet.

What is more likely is that SEOs are making assumptions that favor their own opinions and biases.

It’s the same for me. I may not have full context or knowledge and may have inherent biases that influence my interpretation, but I try to be as fair as I can be. If I’m wrong, it means that I will learn something new and that’s a good thing! SEOs can, and do, interpret things differently.

Gael Breton said it well:

I’ve been around long enough to see many SEO myths created over the years and I can point you to who started many of them and what they misunderstood. We’ll likely see a lot of new myths from this leak that we’ll be dealing with for the next decade or longer.

Let’s look at a few things that in my opinion are being misinterpreted or where conclusions are being drawn where they shouldn’t be.

SiteAuthority

As much as I want to be able to say Google has a Site Authority score that they use for ranking that’s like DR, that part specifically is about compressed quality metrics and talks about quality.

I believe DR is more an effect that happens as you have a lot of pages with strong PageRank, not that it’s necessarily something Google uses. Lots of pages with higher PageRank that internally link to each other means you’re more likely to create stronger pages.

  • Do I believe that PageRank could be part of what Google calls quality? Yes.
  • Do I think that’s all of it? No.
  • Could Site Authority be something similar to DR? Maybe. It fits in the bigger picture.
  • Can I prove that or even that it’s used in rankings? No, not from this.

From some of the Google testimony to the US Department of Justice, we found out that quality is often measured with an Information Satisfaction (IS) score from the raters. This isn’t directly used in rankings, but is used for feedback, testing, and fine-tuning models.

We know the quality raters have the concept of E-E-A-T, but again that’s not exactly what Google uses. They use signals that align to E-E-A-T.

Some of the E-E-A-T signals that Google has mentioned are:

  • PageRank
  • Mentions on authoritative sites
  • Site queries. This could be “site:http://ahrefs.com E-E-A-T” or searches like “ahrefs E-E-A-T”

So could some kind of PageRank scores extrapolated to the domain level and called Site Authority be used by Google and be part of what makes up the quality signals? I’d say it’s plausible, but this leak doesn’t prove it.

I can recall 3 patents from Google I’ve seen about quality scores. One of them aligns with the signals above for site queries.

I should point out that just because something is patented, doesn’t mean it is used. The patent around site queries was written in part by Navneet Panda. Want to guess who the Panda algorithm that related to quality was named after? I’d say there’s a good chance this is being used.

The others were around n-gram usage and seemed to be to calculate a quality score for a new website and another mentioned time on site.

Sandbox

I think this has been misinterpreted as well. The document has a field called hostAge and refers to a sandbox, but it specifically says it’s used “to sandbox fresh spam in serving time.”

To me, that doesn’t confirm the existence of a sandbox in the way that SEOs see it where new sites can’t rank. To me, it reads like a spam protection measure.

Clicks

Are clicks used in rankings? Well, yes, and no.

We know Google uses clicks for things like personalization, timely events, testing, feedback, etc. We know they have models upon models trained on the click data including navBoost. But is that directly accessing the click data and being used in rankings? Nothing I saw confirms that.

The problem is SEOs are interpreting this as CTR is a ranking factor. Navboost is made to predict which pages and features will be clicked. It’s also used to cut down on the number of returned results which we learned from the DOJ trial.

As far as I know, there is nothing to confirm that it takes into account the click data of individual pages to re-order the results or that if you get more people to click on your individual results, that your rankings would go up.

That should be easy enough to prove if it was the case. It’s been tried many times. I tried it years ago using the Tor network. My friend Russ Jones (may he rest in peace) tried using residential proxies.

I’ve never seen a successful version of this and people have been buying and trading clicks on various sites for years. I’m not trying to discourage you or anything. Test it yourself, and if it works, publish the study.

Rand Fishkin’s tests for searching and clicking a result at conferences years ago showed that Google used click data for trending events, and they would boost whatever result was being clicked. After the experiments, the results went right back to normal. It’s not the same as using them for the normal rankings.

Authors

We know Google matches authors with entities in the knowledge graph and that they use them in Google news.

There seems to be a decent amount of author info in these documents, but nothing about them confirms that they’re used in rankings as some SEOs are speculating.

Was Google lying to us?

What I do disagree with whole-heartedly is SEOs being angry with the Google Search Advocates and calling them liars. They’re nice people who are just doing their job.

If they told us something wrong, it’s likely because they don’t know, they were misinformed, or they’ve been instructed to obfuscate something to prevent abuse. They don’t deserve the hate that the SEO community is giving them right now. We’re lucky that they share information with us at all.

If you think something they said is wrong, go and run a test to prove it. Or if there’s a test you want me to run, let me know. Just being mentioned in the docs is not proof that a thing is used in rankings.

Final Thoughts

While I may agree or I may disagree with the interpretations of other SEOs, I respect all who are willing to share their analysis. It’s not easy to put yourself or your thoughts out there for public scrutiny.

I also want to reiterate that unless these fields specifically say they are used in rankings, that the information could just as easily be used for something else. We definitely don’t need any posts about Google’s 14,000 ranking factors.

If you want my thoughts on a particular thing, message me on X or LinkedIn.



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Do Higher Content Scores Mean Higher Google Rankings? Our Data Says It’s Unlikely.

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Do Higher Content Scores Mean Higher Google Rankings? Our Data Says It's Unlikely.

I studied the correlation between rankings and content scores from four popular content optimization tools: Clearscope, Surfer, MarketMuse, and Frase. The result? Weak correlations all around.

This suggests (correlation does not necessarily imply causation!) that obsessing over your content score is unlikely to lead to significantly higher Google rankings.

Does that mean content optimization scores are pointless?

No. You just need to know how best to use them and understand their flaws.

Most tools’ content scores are based on keywords. If top-ranking pages mention keywords your page doesn’t, your score will be low. If it does, your score will be high.

While this has its obvious flaws (having more keyword mentions doesn’t always mean better topic coverage), content scores can at least give some indication of how comprehensively you’re covering the topic. This is something Google is looking for.

Google says that comprehensively covering the topic is a sign of quality contentGoogle says that comprehensively covering the topic is a sign of quality content

If your page’s score is significantly lower than the scores of competing pages, you’re probably missing important subtopics that searchers care about. Filling these “content gaps” might help improve your rankings.

However, there’s nuance to this. If competing pages score in the 80-85 range while your page scores 79, it likely isn’t worth worrying about. But if it’s 95 vs. 20 then yeah, you should probably try to cover the topic better.

Key takeaway

Don’t obsess over content scores. Use them as a barometer for topic coverage. If your score is significantly lower than competitors, you’re probably missing important subtopics and might rank higher by filling those “content gaps.”

There are at least two downsides you should be aware of when it comes to content scores.

They’re easy to cheat

Content scores tend to be largely based on how many times you use the recommended set of keywords. In some tools, you can literally copy-paste the entire list, draft nothing else, and get an almost perfect score.

Scoring 98 on MarketMuse after shoehorning all the suggested keywords without any semblance of a draftScoring 98 on MarketMuse after shoehorning all the suggested keywords without any semblance of a draft

This is something we aim to solve with our upcoming content optimization tool: Content Master.

I can’t reveal too much about this yet, but it has a big USP compared to most existing content optimization tools: its content score is based on topic coverage—not just keywords.

For example, it tells us that our SEO strategy template should better cover subtopics like keyword research, on-page SEO, and measuring and tracking SEO success.

Preview of our upcoming Content Master toolPreview of our upcoming Content Master tool

But, unlike other content optimization tools, lazily copying and pasting related keywords into the document won’t necessarily increase our content score. It’s smart enough to understand that keyword coverage and topic coverage are different things.

Sidenote.

This tool is still in production so the final release may look a little different.

They encourage copycat content

Content scores tell you how well you’re covering the topic based on what’s already out there. If you cover all important keywords and subtopics from the top-ranking pages and create the ultimate copycat content, you’ll score full marks.

This is a problem because quality content should bring something new to the table, not just rehash existing information. Google literally says this in their helpful content guidelines.

Google says quality content goes beyond obvious information. It needs to bring something new to the tableGoogle says quality content goes beyond obvious information. It needs to bring something new to the table

In fact, Google even filed a patent some years back to identify ‘information gain’: a measurement of the new information provided by a given article, over and above the information present in other articles on the same topic.

You can’t rely on content optimization tools or scores to create something unique. Making something that stands out from the rest of the search results will require experience, experimentation, or effort—something only humans can have/do.

Enrich common knowledge with new information and experiences in your contentEnrich common knowledge with new information and experiences in your content

Big thanks to my colleagues Si Quan and Calvinn who did the heavy lifting for this study. Nerd notes below. 😉

  • For the study, we selected 20 random keywords and pulled the top 20 ranking pages.
  • We pulled the SERPs before the March 2024 update was rolled out.
  • Some of the tools had issues pulling the top 20 pages, which we suspect was due to SERP features.
  • Clearscope didn’t give numerical scores; they opted for grades. We used ChatGPT to convert those grades into numbers.
  • Despite their increasing prominence in the SERPs, most of the tools had trouble analyzing Reddit, Quora, and YouTube. They typically gave a zero or no score for these results. If they gave no scores, we excluded them from the analysis.
  • The reason why we calculated both Spearman and Kendall correlations (and took the average) is because according to Calvinn (our Data Scientist), Spearman correlations are more sensitive and therefore more prone to being swayed by small sample size and outliers. On the other hand, the Kendall rank correlation coefficient only takes order into account. So, it is more robust for small sample sizes and less sensitive to outliers.

Final thoughts

Improving your content score is unlikely to hurt Google rankings. After all, although the correlation between scores and rankings is weak, it’s still positive. Just don’t obsess and spend hours trying to get a perfect score; scoring in the same ballpark as top-ranking pages is enough.

You also need to be aware of their downsides, most notably that they can’t help you craft unique content. That requires human creativity and effort.

Any questions or comments? Ping me on X or LinkedIn.



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Unlocking Brand Growth: Strategies for B2B and E-commerce Marketers

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Unlocking Brand Growth: Strategies for B2B and E-commerce Marketers

In today’s fast-paced digital landscape, scaling a brand effectively requires more than just an innovative product or service. For B2B and e-commerce marketers, understanding the intricacies of growth strategies across different stages of business development is crucial.  

A recent analysis of 71 brands offers valuable insights into the optimal strategies for startups, scaleups, mature brands, and majority offline businesses. Here’s what we learned. 

Startup Stage: Building the Foundation 

Key Strategy: Startups focus on impressions-driven channels like Paid Social to establish their audience base. This approach is essential for gaining visibility and creating a strong initial footprint in the market. 

Case Study: Pooch & Mutt exemplified this strategy by leveraging Paid Social to achieve significant year-on-year revenue gains while also improving acquisition costs. This foundational step is crucial for setting the stage for future growth and stability. 

Scaleup Stage: Accelerating Conversion 

Key Strategy: For scaleups, having already established an audience, the focus shifts to conversion activities. Increasing spend in impressions-led media helps continue generating demand while maintaining a balance with acquisition costs. 

Case Study: The Essence Vault successfully applied this approach, scaling their Meta presence while minimizing cost increases. This stage emphasizes the importance of efficient spending to maximize conversion rates and sustain growth momentum. 

Mature Stage: Expanding Horizons 

Key Strategy: Mature brands invest in higher funnel activities to avoid market saturation and explore international expansion opportunities. This strategic pivot ensures sustained growth and market diversification. 

Case Study: Represent scaled their efforts on TikTok, enhancing growth and improving Meta efficiency. By expanding their presence in the US, they exemplified how mature brands can navigate saturation and seek new markets for continued success. 

Majority Offline Brands: Embracing Digital Channels 

Key Strategy: Majority offline brands primarily invest in click-based channels like Performance Max. However, the analysis reveals significant opportunities in Paid Social, suggesting a balanced approach for optimal results. 

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