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How To Use Instagram Reels For Business

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How To Use Instagram Reels For Business

Social media continues to be an essential way for businesses to connect with their customers.

With the constant evolution to stay relevant, Instagram Reels emerged to compete with the popularity of TikTok.

So what is it and how is it different from TikTok or Instagram Stories?

In this column, we’ll take a look at how Instagram Reels work, check out examples of brands using them right, and share tips to help you make the most of your Reels, too.

What Are Instagram Reels?

Instagram Reels is a feature similar to other social media options that allow users to create short videos to appeal to their target audience.

In Reels, you can edit and put together video clips to create entertaining videos using uploaded content, filters, text, audio, and editing tools.

Instagram Reels has gained popularity with its “Remix this Reel” option that allows users to record their video next to another user’s video.

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This has created trending moments and encourages collaboration and engagement with a community of followers.

Unlike Instagram Stories, Reels won’t disappear within 24 hours.

They also follow an algorithm to appeal to the users’ interests.

Instagram recommends trending reels for users to view, similar to the “TikTok for You” page offered on their competitor’s app.

This boosts engagement as users easily access and explore videos, helping you grow your followers organically and creating a domino effect of improved ranking for your brand.

So how can they benefit your business?

Let’s look at ways that brands can use Instagram Reels to increase engagement and visibility through their social media presence.

Leverage Trends To Appeal To Your Target Audience

A few minutes perusing Instagram Reels will quickly reveal ongoing trends among users.

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These can be audio clips, remixed videos, or signature tracks that play in the background.

Jumping on the trend train can help your video get more views and allows your team to insert your message or products into content that is already popular among users.

Create Authentic Content

To appeal to your target audience, find a balance between looking like a professionally curated video and coming across as an ad.

Authentic content is the key to engagement that draws users to platforms like Instagram in the first place.

While relaying your message and targeting potential buyers is important, creating interest in your product and building a following is also worthwhile.

Consider highlighting customer and employee experiences in these short videos.

Shoppers are more conscious than ever about the brands they support.

Highlighting your commitment to sustainability, social justice, and the environment can increase customer loyalty.

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Social media helps tell potential customers who the brand is versus what it can offer.

Creating relatability is also key to effective reels.

Consider this reel from Hasbro that highlights children opening a new toy.

A short video shows the unboxing, followed by a montage of clips of the children enjoying the product.

Paired with a tagline and CTA for parents, this is an effective ad that doesn’t feel like a commercial.

It feels more like a PSA.

See how happy these children are?

Here’s how you can have the same experience in your home.

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Besides authentic content from product users, behind-the-scenes reels are also popular.

People naturally gravitate toward videos that offer exclusive looks at content that the average customer doesn’t see.

Puma offers access to the Puma Vault in its reels, which uncovers products that haven’t been seen before.

These video clips rolled out in segments, create interest, offer a look at a handful of products, and garner close to 23,000 views.

Balance Entertainment With Education

Most Instagram users scroll through the app to be entertained, not necessarily to shop or find deals.

Businesses need to consider who is scrolling and their motive.

Creating entertaining reels is important to get views and increase brand visibility.

Reels have also been a great place to educate users.

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Consider your particular niche and the products your brand offers.

Are there opportunities for further education about the products, their use, how to care for them, etc.?

Tutorials can be especially appealing on this short-form video platform.

Home Depot offers reels with tips and easy DIY projects that they compile using Instagram Reels.

The example of how to update a shower had almost 53,000 views.

Spotlight Products And New Releases

Using Instagram Reels to promote products can benefit brands as they create short, engaging content that highlights new releases.

Debuting new products can create a more authentic ad without viewers feeling like they were targeted through an advertisement.

The following reel from Dyson highlights a new product through a brief video showing how to use it with descriptions through text.

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The description encourages viewers to follow the brand and gives concise details about the product.

It’s short and simple, and with over 73,000 views, an effective way to get your products in front of customers.

Reveal Offers/Promotions/Upcoming Events

Reels can also communicate your brand’s available offers and promotions.

This can be especially lucrative during seasonal sales, encouraging potential buyers to shop after seeing your message.

Sephora offered a short, simple video displaying lip gloss with the promotion of “Buy Two, Get One Free.”

It is short, to the point, and has been viewed over 200,000 times.

Through this straightforward advertising, viewers don’t feel like they are viewing an ad.

Instead, they feel like they are learning more about a product with the caveat of a deal when they read the tagline.

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It doesn’t view like an advertisement which is reflected in the number of views.

Final Thoughts

As in any social media campaign, finding your comfort level when creating content takes time.

Integrating Reels into your advertising plan is a no-brainer, especially for businesses with an Instagram following.

Short videos are a great way to maximize impact because you can customize them according to your brand’s goals.

With built-in editing tools and how to use Instagram tutorials, brands can create and share content easily to reach thousands already scrolling through the platform.

More resources:


Featured Image: Roman Samborskyi/Shutterstock

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Building a Better Search Engine: Lessons From Neeva’s CEO

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Building a Better Search Engine: Lessons From Neeva’s CEO

After helping to grow Google’s advertising business for over 15 years, Sridhar Ramaswamy began to feel Google’s dependence on ads was limiting the quality of search results.

Determined to prove he could achieve a better search experience without ads, Ramaswamy co-founded and launched Neeva in 2019.

As the CEO of his own search company, Ramaswamy is accountable to the users of his product who pay a monthly subscription to access Neeva.

“No ads” means Neeva doesn’t have an incentive to collect data on its users, making it the only search engine on the market that’s both ad-free with a privacy option.

Ramaswamy is currently on the conference circuit raising awareness about Neeva, and we managed to catch up with him at Collision last week in Toronto.

We profiled Neeva once before and welcomed Ramaswamy as a guest on the Search Engine Journal Show in December.

However, each time we only scratched the surface. Now, we want to dig deeper.

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So, what makes Neeva different from the other companies — and what makes Neeva a viable alternative to Google and Bing?

What Are Neeva’s Core Values?

Many companies enter the market making lofty claims of how they’ll do right by users. Even Google once had “don’t be evil” written into its code of conduct: a promise to which some critics argue it hasn’t lived up. Google has de-emphasized “Don’t be evil” in its code of conduct, though it was never removed.

In 2021, Google was sued by three former employees over its “Don’t be evil” motto. They allege that failure to live up to the motto is the equivalent of a breach of contract.

To better understand how Neeva will continue delivering a product that puts users’ needs first, I asked Ramaswamy what Neeva’s core values are.

“It’s not something we have published, but this is something I’ve talked about a lot with Vivek [Raghunathan, co-founder of Neeva], and I feel good about saying it,” Ramaswamy began. “At our core, we think that, as a company, we want to make technology serve people.”

“I think many other technology companies, especially in the last 25, have turned rather exploitative,” he continued. “I think the ad model exemplifies this. Basically, if I can convince you and get you hooked on my product, I can pretty much do anything.”

“It’s Technology Serving People”

Make no mistake: Neeva is a for-profit organization, though Ramaswamy says its subscription-based revenue model is designed to serve people rather than advertisers.

“Yes, companies are for-profit, but I think if you set up your values to be aligned with your user, to be aligned with your customer, you’ll always serve them,” he said. “To me, that part is important. If you had to say, ‘Hey, what exemplifies what you do?’ It’s technology serving people. This is why we do things like offer a flat price for the search utility you get from us.”

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“Technology At Scale Is Quite Inexpensive”

Many companies within the sector lead consumers to believe scaling technology is expensive, which is how some justify charging higher fees, for instance, as they grow.

It doesn’t have to be that way, Ramaswamy says, as he believes the cost of technology at scale is overblown.

“It’s our belief that technology at scale is actually quite inexpensive,” he noted. “That’s the magic of technology, but right now, the way all of these companies are structured — as they scale, they squeeze more money from you.”

“It’s not like you’re getting more value, though obviously there are exceptions,” Ramaswamy continued. “But it’s really back to the basics of how you create products that delight people. And to me, that’s an honorable living.”

From left to right: Brittany Kaiser, Own Your Data; Sridhar Ramaswamy, Neeva; Ashley Gold, Axios.

What Does Neeva Do To ‘Serve People’?

Neeva’s definition of ‘technology serving people’ is exemplified by its feedback system.

Roughly 20% of the Neeva team is tasked solely with listening to customer feedback and using it to shape the product experience.

On the other hand, many criticize Google for not giving users what they want out of a search experience.

I asked Ramaswamy if he could give examples of specific customer feedback that helped shape Neeva into what it is today.

“There’s tons of feedback that comes to us. Sometimes we feel bad about not being about to take care of all of it,” he started. “But to give an example: We did a currency converter because, believe it or not, it was a top request. Initially, I did not understand this feedback. I was like, ‘Really? It’s that hard for you to click on a link and then type in your numbers and get your currency converted?”

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“But then,” Ramaswamy said, “I realized a larger truth about how people think about the internet.”

“People Fear Clicking On Links”

Neeva was initially against going the Google route of delivering content directly in the SERPs, but has had to make some concessions.

Through listening to customer feedback, the Neeva team learned there’s a real apprehension toward clicking on links in search results.

“Clicking on a link has now become an adversarial task. People actually fear clicking on links because they don’t know what’s on the other side,” Ramaswamy said. “Is it going to be a pop-up? Is it going to tell you that your computer has a virus? Is it something else? That’s the reason why we put [a currency converter] right into the search engine. So that’s one example.”

Another perk offered to Neeva subscribers is access to a Slack channel where customers can engage in group discussions with developers.

“A lot of people said, ‘We want to be able to offer feedback to [improve] your search results,’” Ramaswamy said. “So we built a community feedback feature that’s released to some people; it’s not released to everybody.”

The way it works, he explained, is users “can say, ‘Hey, this result is not relevant.’ Or, ‘This result is the top result for this query.’”

“This list sort of goes on and on,” Ramaswamy said. “Customers are really a source of lots of ideas.”

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Building a Better Search Engine: Lessons From Neeva’s CEOFrom left to right: Brittany Kaiser, Own Your Data; Sridhar Ramaswamy, Neeva; Ashley Gold, Axios.

Neeva Is A Customer-Guided Product

At Collision, Ramaswamy described what he eventually aims to accomplish with Neeva, and how it differs from the goals of larger search engines like Google.

After speaking with him, I asked if he could clarify what he meant by wanting to “let society figure out” what to do with Neeva.

“I spoke about it more in the spirit of: Google spends a billion, makes a hundred billion. My thing was more: We want to make a couple of billion and let society figure out what it wants to do with the service,” Ramaswamy explained. “It’s more of a general argument around not captive capitalism, but competitive capitalism.”

“The beautiful thing about technology is creating a product for 100 million people is not wildly different from creating a product for a billion people,” he continued. “That’s the magic of scale and technology.”

Being paid for by the people who use it gives Neeva unique flexibility regarding future growth.

Users don’t have as much influence over a product like Google Search, considering they typically don’t pay to use it.

Although even for a free product, Ramasamy argues that Google could be doing much more to give users value.

“My point was a customer-paid product makes it much easier for us to release the product to the whole world [and] still run a profitable company, but not at the kind of obscene scale that I see Facebook or Google operating,” he said. “People always say …  ‘Well, Google gives me free Gmail. Will they stop giving it?’ And my rough answer is: Well, I’m sure, with 100 billion dollars, a bunch of us are going to make really good decisions about how to use that money.”

Ramaswamy said that users “don’t need a monopolist to make that decision and decide they want to give you free Gmail. We don’t need charity from rich companies in order to do this; we need competition, so more of the money that is being spent on this comes to us.”

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Building a Better Search Engine: Lessons From Neeva’s CEOFrom left to right: Brittany Kaiser, Own Your Data; Sridhar Ramaswamy, Neeva; Ashley Gold, Axios.

Will Neeva Keep Its Privacy Promises?

DuckDuckGo, another search engine that touts privacy as its key selling point, was recently a source of controversy after it was discovered to be passing along a minor amount of data to Microsoft.

That stemmed from the deal DuckDuckGo has to use Bing’s search index.

I asked Ramasamy what measures Neeva has in place to keep its zero data collection promises.

“Not serving ads is the biggest measure we have in place. And, we are building our own index,” he said, adding that the company is actively “writing down human ratings and getting data back.”

“We truly want to create a differentiated product,” Ramasamy emphasized. “We started with using the Bing API for search [but] in many ways, I think we would have been better off investing in search from day one. We are a product company, and we want to become a much better search engine. That’s the big differentiator.”

“We’re Making Foundational Investments In Search”

In addition to keeping Neeva ad-free, it will be able to maintain its zero-data promise by building its own search index.

DuckDuckGo, for example, ran into trouble because it’s wholly dependent on Microsoft for search results. Ramasamy says Neeva is the only company outside Google and Bing crawling and indexing the web.

That claim is backed up by an October 2020 report on digital competition by the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Antitrust. The report states:

“The high cost of maintaining a fresh index, and the decision by many large webpages to block most crawlers, significantly limits new search engine entrants. Today, the only English-language search engines that maintain their own comprehensive webpage index are Google and Bing.”

He acknowledged that, in response, many ask, “What’s the big deal? What difference does it make?”

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“It lets us do things like creating a much better shopping experience,” Ramasamy explained, noting that, for instance, Neeva “launched Reddit links in search results … because we work with Reddit to get their index. So we have an index of all the web pages they’re serving.”

Ramasamy said that users can receive better-quality results for such queries as, “What are the most interesting Reddit posts that correspond to this query?”

Neeva can “launch features like that, because we’re making foundational investments in search; pretty much the only company outside of Google and Microsoft to be doing this.”

“We increasingly use Bing as a fallback when we cannot answer queries,” Ramasamy acknowledged. However, he said, “Over time, our aspiration is to be able to do more and more of the search results ourselves.”

Neeva’s Sole Focus Is Traditional Web Content (For Now)

With people’s search behavior turning more toward short videos, I asked Ramaswamy if Neeva has any plans to index content like Web Stories or TikTok videos.

For now, Neeva’s sole focus is to solve search for text-based web content.

“Solving for search, especially things like spoken search, is enough of a large problem that we have not quite gone there,” Ramaswamy said. “We have working arrangements. We have partnerships with companies like Twitter and companies like Reddit to better surface their content.

Twitter, he pointed out, “Has a lot of real-time information. So we’re focused on things like that right now and less on video. That would be a fun project to do.”

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Neeva’s Greatest Challenge Is Awareness

As we wrapped up our conversation, I asked Ramaswamy: What’s the most significant hurdle for Neeva to overcome on its journey toward mass adoption?

Ramaswamy’s answer: “It really is about competition.”

The product, he said, is not the issue.

“We have a great product. Compared to ad-supported options … the free Neeva search engine is infinitely better,” Ramaswamy explained. “The place where we struggle is getting the word out, getting people to know us as an option, and getting people to set us as the default search in Safari, which is impossible.

“Demand More Choice”

As Ramaswamy explained, there’s no incentive for a company like Google to innovate if it doesn’t have any challengers.

Companies tend to improve their products when faced with more robust competition. But the only way for more competitors to enter the search market is for consumers to demand more options.

“To me, this is the biggest ask that I would have,” Ramaswamy said, “is to demand more choice, because competition produces better products.”

In turn, he said, “That competition creates better products for us. An incumbent that is doing very well has no incentive to innovate [or] to disrupt.”

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Conversely, over at Neeva, “We have nothing to lose,” Ramaswamy told me. “We’re going to swing for the fences [and make it] easier for people to switch, for them to try Neeva, for them to decide for themselves if they want it or not.”

What’s Next For Neeva?

Before parting ways, I had to ask what we could expect next from Neeva.

“There’s a lot I’ve learned from Google My Business in terms of local businesses – even in terms of Search Console – that I feel confident we can do better,” Ramaswamy said, adding that “GMB, as you know, is a real problem for lots of people. Especially agencies that want to update information for a bunch of companies that they work with.”

The hope, Ramaswamy said, is that “we’ll have better tools. But not yet.”

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