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Why Esports organizations are losing business due to lack of SEO

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Why Esports organizations are losing business due to lack of SEO

SEO is a standard within a number of marketing strategies through a myriad of industries, but has someone found themselves outside of the gaming and esports industries? There is a non-factor within new marketing verticals such as influencer marketing despite its immense potential to impact.

During the latest edition of the Gamactica Podcast, I got a chance to talk about the lack of SEO, or Esports SEO, that exists within the industry with Michael Ashford, CEO of The Game Awards.

In this article, I share some highlights and key insights that are affecting the fate of many Esports organizations.

What Esports can learn from sports and other industries

“I guess where Esports has been very pioneering there are also a lot of things that it can learn from other industries in the same vein,” he said.

“The big controversial one is the sports and Esports gear compared a lot. I’m a big fan of it because sports do very well with media rights and distribution deals. They do very well with sponsorships, two things that are absolutely pivotal and critical to the future of Esports. Those two things go hand-in-hand, they ensure everyone continues to be stable and everyone wins off the back of them. Esports as a term has really only been popular for 10 years. Before that you would just be OpTic gaming, people would just type in “optic” and their website would come up, their socials were there, everything was great and now there are probably 10,000 companies that all call themselves Esports something or another, and it’s a very different problem.

Doesn’t matter to OpTic, because OpTic is still a leading name and people still search for OpTic on Google. OpTic still comes up but it does matter to new businesses coming in.

“There are three waves to Esports”

You have wave one which is all the teams, the TOs, and the publishing companies.

Wave two is supporting services, people like ourselves, agencies, creative agencies, sales, and talent specialists.

Wave three is all the supplementary services under that, and that’s where that trickle-down comes down with publishers at the top and everyone in these waves underneath waiting to get paid. That is where wave three is so pivotal and why you hear stories of these companies trying to get in now that are very challenged because they’re not using proven techniques that work outside of the market to get into the market. They are trying to conform to the market that already exists, and you can’t take on an Esports Awards because we own that domain, we own that optimization, and we have seven years of history working with Google, YouTube, Amazon, we have even worked with Lexus. All these brands have given us that domain authority that is very hard to purchase now.” said, Michael Ashford, CEO of The Game Awards.

The advantage of domain authority in Esports

Ashford goes on to discuss the competitive advantage the domain authority provides them, especially as the Esports landscape continues to evolve and grow.

“So, if you were going to take us on as a competitor, you probably don’t want to go against that unless you’ve got a big, realistic search engine budget to go against us. That’s where marketing gives you that advantage, when you do marketing you put yourself in the eye of the consumer, you look at their journey, you understand their peeves, and you gain a finer understanding of what they’re doing.”

Ashford talked about the difficulties that face new entities, such as Esports teams face as they are entering a fiercely competitive space.

“If you’re a team that just got into this and you’re saying ‘I really want a big sponsorship to land on my doorstep’ like you have to be in their consideration and that’s what it comes down to. If I’m buying for one of the biggest companies in the world and I have a budget and I type in “Esports teams” or “successful Esports teams” or “biggest Esports teams” on Google, if you’re not on that list you’re already outliers from the consideration perspective because all of those other brands have long term domain authority” he said.

“The OpTics, The FaZe, the DSMs have done it for years and they’ll be the first stable thing that people see.”

Despite the proven data, SEO remains on the peripherals of the gaming, Esports, and content creation industries.

While platforms such as Twitch struggle to effectively scale the monetization of creators and their platforms, SEO continues to be an absolute need, a critical of conversation which eludes these spaces.

The Game Awards will be taking place on December 11th-13th in Las Vegas, Nevada, and will air on platforms such as Twitch and Twitter.


Anthony DiMoro is CEO of Gamactica. He can be found on Twitter @AnthonyDiMoro.

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LinkedIn Newsletters: What I’ve Learned (So Far)

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LinkedIn Newsletters: What I've Learned (So Far)

Four weeks ago, I launched my LinkedIn newsletter called The Well-Branded Woman.

It’s been a freaky, fun-filled ride, complete with unexpected twists and turns. What I thought was going to happen didn’t – and what did happen blew my mind.

Here’s what I did and what I’ve learned (so far!).

Here’s how I set up my first LinkedIn newsletter:

 

I used market research to build excitement.

A week and a half before I launched my newsletter, I created a LinkedIn poll telling people about my new newsletter focus (Gen X and Millennial women) and asking what I should name it.

I wanted to ensure the name would “click” with my target reader. Plus, I wanted to build awareness that I’d be launching a newsletter soon.

If I were to do it again, I would have allowed at least two weeks for this process – maybe a bit more. It worked out because I had some strong newsletter names to test – but the timeline would have been too short if I had started from scratch.

I created attention-grabbing graphics for the newsletter.

My midlife-aged readers would want to know that I was in their age group, so my wonderfully talented designer created a bright orange featured image template with my photo front and center. I wanted a color and design that popped off the page — plus LinkedIn says that images with faces “resonate more with audiences.”

Graphics in hand, I was ready to write my first article where…

I immediately dropped multiple actionable tips in my first LinkedIn newsletter article.

My first article was about how Gen X and Millennial women can transform themselves into online thought leaders. I purposely wrote a very long, informative piece that shared tips I didn’t see anywhere else and were specific to my audience.

I also wove in personal information to help the reader get to know me.

The final article was over 1,800 words – way longer than I had planned. I was curious if anyone would read all those words, but I knew the article provided solid, actionable information.

I also invited women to connect with me and to DM me.

What are my LinkedIn newsletter results (so far?)

 

  • By the end of the first day after publication, I had 163 subscribers. I was so happy! LinkedIn automatically sends subscribers an email as soon as I publish a newsletter, so I reach these readers directly.
  • By that following Monday, I had over four hundred subscribers. I was even happier!
  • And then, a LinkedIn editor found my article and promoted it on the home feed. All of a sudden, my LinkedIn DMs blew up. Women read my article and vibed with my message. Responding to everyone took more than eight hours, spread over two days. It was amazing!
  • Since then, the article has been viewed over 100,000 times and has received over 1,000 likes and over 130 comments. And yes, I responded to all of those comments. Why?
  • It’s not enough to simply post on LinkedIn and call it good. If you want to build a community, that means engaging with your audience right after they post and helping them feel seen. By doing so, I was able to start some fantastic conversations with women who would never have opened up to me any other way.

Today, the newsletter has almost 1,700 subscribers. And yes, that first article is positioning!

My LinkedIn newsletter future feels bright.

What I’m (still) learning about LinkedIn newsletters:

 

  • I’ve created SEO writing articles for so long that I naturally thought that’s what this audience would want to learn from me. It was a delightful surprise to know my new audience is looking for personal branding tips and how to future-proof their careers.
  • I had to throw my editorial calendar out the window, but I’m okay with that. I’m creating articles on the fly as I read the comments and get a sense of what women what to know.
  • I’m still figuring out how to monetize. Right now, creating the newsletter costs me time and money. Would I like to make money from it? Yes, but the time isn’t right. I don’t quite know what the audience needs. I’d rather listen and wait.

I’m playing the long game.

Would I recommend LinkedIn newsletters for other B2B consultants or companies? Yes. It’s turning out to be a powerful content tactic. Overwhelming, but powerful.

Plus, if you’re a freelancer, you could sell LinkedIn newsletter creation and maintenance services. Many B2B companies are new to LinkedIn newsletters, so knowing how to plan and write them could open up a new profit center. Especially if you work with thought leaders and consultants who need branding — but don’t have time to write.

My take: LinkedIn newsletters get a thumbs up.

I’ll keep you posted on my progress.

What do you think?

Are you considering trying LinkedIn newsletters (or suggesting them to your client)? Leave a comment and let me know. 

Oh, and if you want to know how your hero’s journey can help you build your personal brand, check out my latest Charisma Boost post.

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