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TikTok Launches ‘TikTok Tactics’ Online Course to Help Marketers Level-Up their Platform Approach

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TikTok Launches 'TikTok Tactics' Online Course to Help Marketers Level-Up their Platform Approach


TikTok has launched a new, video-aligned platform training course for marketers, designed to provide tips and insights on how to make best use of the platform for brand promotion and development.

The new ‘TikTok Tactics’ course is an ‘easy to follow, best-practice guide to advertising on TikTok’, which provides a range of lessons on attribution, targeting, creative best practices and more.

The course, which you can sign-up for here, focuses on four key elements:

Each course segment includes a video overview, which eventually points to three varying approaches to each, based on where you’re at in your marketing program.

TikTok Tactics course

For example, as you can see here, in the ‘Attribution’ element, TikTok notes that beginners with limited development resources should start with the standard website pixel, to help track user response data for your campaigns, while more advanced marketers are organizations can move on to its Pixel developer mode and API integration for advanced tracking.

Each element follows the same path, outlining how it can contribute to your overall TikTok marketing strategy, and how you can level up each aspect relative to where you’re at in your process.

TikTok Tactics course

It’s an interesting approach, which, in some ways, seems like TikTok is looking to gamify the progress of your TikTok marketing efforts, with each progressive step putting more reliance on its various tools.

For example, in the ‘Creative’ element, the three steps progress from utilizing your own assets, to partnering with creators via the TikTok Creator Marketplace. Which is logical, that’s one way in which you could scale up your creative elements as you grow your platform presence. But it also guides you further into TikTok’s own tools, and the features that will benefit the company, by bringing more ad dollars into its creator eco-system.

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That’s not to say that this approach is merely self-serving, but basically, TikTok is also looking to boost its own products and services, and in most cases, you don’t necessarily have to use TikTok’s own tools, specifically, to maximize your efforts.  

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But you can, and these basic overviews, which also connect through to more information on each element, provide more specific outlines on how to go about leveling up your on-platform promotions as you progress over time.

As a singular guide, the insights here are fairly basic, but at each step, you are invited to dig deeper to develop your understanding, while TikTok has also included a 19-page guide book to help in your planning and implementation.

TikTok Tactics course

It’s interesting, and definitely worth a look for TikTok marketers, but it maybe doesn’t go into the specifics of on-platform tactics as much as the name might suggest.

Still, it could be worth a look if you want to make best use of TikTok for promotions.

You can sign-up and go through the TikTok Tactics course here.



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LinkedIn Updates Professional Community Policies to Better Reflect What’s Not Allowed in the App

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LinkedIn Updates Professional Community Policies to Better Reflect What's Not Allowed in the App

LinkedIn has announced an update to its Professional Community Policies, which dictate what’s allowed, and what’s not, within your various LinkedIn communications.

The updated policies aim to provide more insight into specific elements of in-app engagement – because people, especially women, are sick of LinkedIn being used as a hook-up site by overeager users who like the looks of their profile image.

That’s not the only reason, but definitely, reports of harassment via LinkedIn’s InMail have been rising.

As explained by LinkedIn:

“As part of our updated policies, we’re publishing a set of expanded resources for members to better understand our policies and how we apply them, including detailed examples of content that isn’t allowed and how we handle account restrictions. While harassment, hate speech, and other abusive content has never been allowed on LinkedIn, we’ve added what types of comments and behaviors go against our Professional Community Policies.”

In this updated format, LinkedIn’s new policy overview includes specific sections outlining what’s not allowed in the app, with links that you can click on for more information.

Follow the links and you’ll be taken to the relevant LinkedIn Help article on that topic, which also includes a section that shares more specific explainers on what’s not allowed in the app.

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LinkedIn policies

The aim is to provide more direct insight into what you can’t do in the app, and with engagement continuing to rise across LinkedIn, it makes sense that, logically, LinkedIn is also going to see more interactions that violate these terms.

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And as noted, women are disproportionately targeted by such activity.

A report by CTV Canada last year found that many female LinkedIn users regularly receive inappropriate messages from men, who’ll often reach out to tell women that they find them attractive. Fast Company reported in 2020 that posts from female users are often targeted with ‘derision, marginalization and even outright hate’, despite LinkedIn being a lass anonymous platform than others, while many other women have reported similar advances or attacks by users in the app.

LinkedIn does have a specific policy against ‘sexual innuendos and unwanted advances’, which now also includes more examples of what’s not allowed.

LinkedIn Community Policies

But the fact that this is even necessary is a little disconcerting – and really, this does seem to be the main focus of this new update, providing more context around what you can’t do in the app, which is really an expansion of general workplace etiquette and ethics.

It seems like that should be a given, and that all users should be able to engage in a professional manner, but of course, as with any widely used platform, there will always be some that push the boundaries, and break the rules, especially if those regulations are unclear.

Which is what LinkedIn’s seeking to clarify, and hopefully, this new format will make it easier for people to understand what they can and can’t do in the app.

You can check out LinkedIn’s updated Professional Community Policies here.

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