Connect with us

MARKETING

Are you using no-code tools?

Published

on

Are you using no-code tools?


MarTech’s daily brief features daily insights, news, tips, and essential bits of wisdom for today’s digital marketer. If you would like to read this before the rest of the internet does, sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox daily.

Good morning, Marketers, and how many no-code tools do you use?

The use of no-code tools to navigate the workday is by now an established trend. Last year (or was it the year before?), I tried to draw a boundary around marketing technology, insisting that tools that were useful to marketers, but had nothing to do with marketing, were not part of the martech space.

Okay, I certainly got some pushback on that, although I still think I’m right. But that doesn’t mean I don’t recognize how important — to some marketing teams at least — such tools can be, especially if they’re free (or cheap), user-friendly and don’t require the involvement of developers or IT.

But I’m wondering whether project management tools like monday.com or integration tools like Zapier are really widely used by marketers, or whether they’re only used by an admittedly sizeable minority (of geeks). Your thoughts are welcome: [email protected]

Kim Davis
Editorial Director

Shorts

Advertisement

Quote of the day. “Are you hiring marketers? Hire parents. Everyone is looking for scrappy and creative marketers. But have you ever seen a parent show a child how a completely empty, beat up cardboard box is actually the world’s most amazing toy?” Melissa Matlins, VP Marketing, B2B, Vimeo


About The Author

Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space.

See also  How marketers can use behavioral data to improve customer experiences

He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020.

Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.

Advertisement



Source link

MARKETING

Martech failure? 50% say loyalty programs don’t offer much value

Published

on

Martech failure? 50% say loyalty programs don't offer much value

The goal of martech is to add value for business and customer via personalized experiences which increase brand engagement. Loyalty programs seem like the perfect channel for this. So why is there such a huge gap between customers’ expectations for those programs and what they get?

Half of all US customers say loyalty programs don’t offer much value, according to a report from digital insights firm Incisiv and Punchh, a customer loyalty services provider. This is a real problem, given the huge impact these programs have on customer retention, satisfaction and brand advocacy. Customers who sign up for them engage with that brand 70% more than those who do not. 


Get the daily newsletter digital marketers rely on.


The gaps. So what is it customers want and aren’t getting?

  • 70% prefer to manage loyalty programs via app.
    • 26% Top 150 retailers and restaurant chains have a dedicated loyalty app.
  • 67% expect surprise gifts.
    • 28% Retailers and restaurant chains send gifts, offers or discounts on special occasions
  • 75% prefer instant discounts/redemptions.
    • 16% Retailers and restaurant chains offer instant discount on purchases instead of reward points.
  • 72% expect personalized rewards.
    • 48% Retailers and restaurant chains offer some form of personalization.

Enough with the cards already. It’s 2022 and people have been irritated about physical loyalty cards for decades. In case your own experience isn’t proof enough: 43% of shoppers say physical cards are the biggest obstacles to claiming rewards. And, this shouldn’t be surprising, 57% of shoppers like to engage with loyalty programs on their mobile phones. This means a digital rewards card is the bare minimum if you don’t have an app. 

See also  How to Forecast Spend Potential for Paid Social Campaigns [Free Tool]

Read next: Leaning on loyalty, Chipotle orchestrates engagement across channels

If you do have an app, it should clearly provide more functionality and benefits than a card. The more it does that, the more people are likely to use it. Over 70% of shoppers are more likely to participate in a loyalty program that provides access to loyalty cards and rewards via its mobile app. However, only 4% of grocery retailers offer enhanced rewards or benefits on their apps.

Make members feel special. Joining a loyalty program signals that a customer values your brand (37% of shoppers are willing to pay to join or upgrade to a higher tier of their loyalty membership). Make sure they know you feel the same about them. Nearly 60% say loyalty programs don’t make them feel they are a part of an exclusive group. How? Well, 46% want premier or exclusive access to sales and promotions.

Advertisement

Why we care. I can’t tell you how many websites I registered with and forgot about that send me an email on my birthday. I get them from a few loyalty programs as well. I’ve never gotten one with an offer or a discount. 

The bare minimum martech stack provides data unification, digitization and channel integration. A good one offers real-time analysis of customer behavior (past purchases, browsing history, etc.) combined with things like product attributes and availability to create an attractive personalized offering. For the customer, loyalty programs have to be more than a way to earn points. They have to give something unique and special. If your stack can’t tell you what that thing is, there’s something wrong with it.

See also  The Quickest Guide to Designing Marketing Automation Campaigns

About The Author

Constantine von Hoffman is managing editor of MarTech. A veteran journalist, Con has covered business, finance, marketing and tech for CBSNews.com, Brandweek, CMO, and Inc. He has been city editor of the Boston Herald, news producer at NPR, and has written for Harvard Business Review, Boston Magazine, Sierra, and many other publications. He has also been a professional stand-up comedian, given talks at anime and gaming conventions on everything from My Neighbor Totoro to the history of dice and boardgames, and is author of the magical realist novel John Henry the Revelator. He lives in Boston with his wife, Jennifer, and either too many or too few dogs.

Source link

Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending