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Best Ways to Reduce Shopping Cart Abandonment

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Best Ways to Reduce Shopping Cart Abandonment


Envision that shopping in a physical store is the same as shopping in an eCommerce store.

You step into a supermarket, pick products from the rack and fill out your shopping basket.

The same scenario can also be witnessed in the kingdom of online business. Regardless of your best-laid offers, clients visit your site, begin shopping, and then close the tab and never come back. It’s because they will be busy watching the trailer of their much-awaited star’s movie.

This is Shopping Cart Abandonment and quite possibly the most significant issue for an online business in terms of its survival. In simple terms, Shopping Cart Abandonment occurs when customers who add an item to their cart leave before placing the order.

Tragically, it’s likewise difficult to escape abandonment altogether. But it is certainly not difficult to work on your eCommerce business experience to diminish abandonment.

In this post, let us check out the techniques for doing that precisely.

To start with, however, we should take a look at the base of abandonment.

Reasons for eCommerce Cart Abandonment

With a huge number of consumers shopping each day, their purpose behind leaving the site without purchasing is not explicit. There could be different circumstances causing a few to finish the checkout cycle.

Let us get started with the primary reasons for Shopping Cart Abandonment.

Sudden Shipping Cost:

Higher or a surprising delivery cost is one of the essential reasons for it. Mostly it happens when the delivery cost surpasses the item cost.

Assuming you don’t reveal the delivery cost at first and the total cost goes beyond their spending plan, consumers will probably  leave.

Sign-Up To Create a New Account:

Most of the users try not to create another account.  It is because of the time involved to fill up the form or the fear of getting promotional messages.

Individuals really like to exit more than shopping when they observe that they need to make another account.

Investigating for Later Buys:

Users generally research before purchasing their craving item. Along that process, they go through a lot of online stores.

They add items to the cart they think of purchasing later. A few clients utilize the trucks to think about things before buying. It is one of the numerous well-known reasons behind Cart Abandonment.

Security Concerns:

eCommerce shopping consistently raises a massive worry for its security. The user needs a definite guarantee for the security of their delicate data imparted to the site.

For more profitable sales, the site should invest in building trust. Assuming that you fall short, the client will leave your site without purchasing.

A Long Check-out Process:

Nobody likes to go through a tedious check-out process. Not-so user-friendly guidelines or a pile of pages between the cycles can be really overwhelming for the clients.

No Multiple Payment Options:

Numerous clients are open to using a specific payment option. The inaccessibility of their preferred choice can steer them to leave the site.

Best Ways to Narrow Down Shopping Cart Abandonment

How aching it would be to witness an enormous number of users on the checkout page but abandoning the carts without placing any order.

This is not the end of the world. It happens with many e-retailers just like you.

There are numerous techniques you can use in an eCommerce store that will shrink the abandonment rate gradually.

Show Signs of Security for Trust Building among Customers:

Some e-retailers see payment forms as a simple and mandatory custom in the business cycle. They have a feeling that they have enticed you with their products, so is there any good reason why you wouldn’t finish up a lengthy form without a doubt? This is undoubtedly not the situation. Moreover, your lengthy payment forms are an essential tool in building trust in your site.

By requesting that your clients finish up a payment form, you’re basically requesting them to entrust you with their private data. This goes a long way past their contact information. You are requesting their credit or debit card details, something many individuals are reluctant to leave behind.

To counterbalance the reluctance of providing their private data, use your payment forms as a chance to build trust. Incorporate trust cues. For example, security logos in an evident position near your payment forms can also do wonders.

Put up a Progress Bar in the Checkout:

Imagine you’re waiting in the queue at a physical store. The person at the bill counter asks you for your postal code, or your contact number, or your loyalty card details. Regardless of whether you have a loyalty card or not, you wish to save by opening one.

These disturbances drag out the Checkout process and should be eliminated in the online store.

Perhaps the ideal way to do that is by showing a Progress Bar for your Checkout pages.

By showing clients where they are in the Checkout cycle, you’re taking out the potential concern that purchasing something from you will take additional time.

It guarantees guests that they will be done soon, and they can return soon to Check out their favorite movie online or whatever they would prefer to be doing. It additionally kills uncertainty and makes the Checkout cycle clear for clients to comprehend.

Have Multiple Payment Choices:

When planning your online business Checkout pages, remember to deliver a wonderful, fulfilling, and eventually consistent shopping experience. Assume you are just adding a single payment option or not so many. Then you are putting barriers between your potential customers and your deals.

Mastercard payment choices are easy decisions. But today’s customers have more options than ever to pay for online purchases. UPI payments and mobile wallets are turning out to be more popular, especially among the younger population.

Offering many payment methods limits or disposes of another explanation why a user will abandon their cart. Also, you’re giving your clients what they need, and that is what’s really going on with it.

Retain Product Thumbnails Throughout the Order Cycle:

When you purchase something in a physical store, you can see whatever you’re purchasing just in front of you. This may not really be the situation in an internet business experience.

The majority of users won’t forget what is in their shopping cart, except if they’re on a shopping marathon.

Like a Progress Bar, including thumbnail pictures of the items they have added to their cart can be another establishing and commendable strategy that confirms the user of what they’re buying.

Showing thumbnails help ground the guest all through the checkout cycle and extraordinarily diminishes the danger that they will leave their cart.

The improved checkout experience is limiting friction and making it simple for clients.

Strong CTAs on the Checkout Page can bring about drastic results:

Many eCommerce websites neglect to add any call to action at their checkout page. Most of the store owners always have the notion that, if the potential customer adds products to the cart and moves to the checkout page they don’t need any push to complete the order.

Checkout pages are the ideal spot for a solid, clear Call to Action (CTA)  that motivates people to finish their purchase.

Keep the context consistent all through your CTAs, through to your checkout cycle. Assuming you favor pleasant and engaging language in your promotion material, keep up with this receptive tone on the checkout page as well.

While it’s critical to incorporate solid CTAs on your checkout pages, it’s similarly essential to guarantee that the context of these CTAs is always reliable.

Make Saving Carts Easier:

When you shop at a physical store, you either aim to purchase something or you don’t. You can stay in the queue to pay for anything that’s in your cart or you can leave the store with nothing. Shopping on the internet isn’t as direct.

Customers hope to exploit the advantages of shopping online, including the capacity to get back to an ongoing order repeatedly. In order to further develop your conversion rates, make it easy for clients to get back to carts in progress.

Saving a Cart should be as simple as clicking a ‘single button’.

Countless possible interruptions may occur during checkout both in a physical store and online shopping. This is why it’s vital to permit customers to get back to their carts to finish the checkout during a period that is convenient for them.

There are multiple ways you can assist clients with saving a shopping cart. You can ask clients to sign into their accounts or you can utilize cookies to remember customer carts without constraining them to sign in. In a perfect world, saving a cart for later finishing must be as simple as it could be expected.

Optimize for a Wonderful Experience:

Assuming your pages, explicitly the checkout pages, need a lot of time to load, then it could seriously influence your deals. The sluggish loading in a site irritates the clients and prompts them to leave the cart abandoned once and for all.

Thus, optimize your web pages and work on their quality and speed meticulously.

Some on-page specialized components are more effortlessly improved than others. For instance, your pictures should be upgraded to keep up with that significant equilibrium between quality and speed. You can likewise restrict the utilization of promotion network trackers, badly executed labels, social plugins, and other lumps to expand your page load times.

There are some other components that are farther outside your ability to control. For example, the pause between a user clicking a place order and processing their payment.

Assuming you’re aware of an inescapable pause when processing payments, consider presenting a visual portrayal of the delay to guarantee clients that something is really occurring. For example, a loader or a progress bar. This tells them that things are without a doubt happening in the background and that they will be done immediately.

A large part of individuals is presently using their mobile phones to shop on the internet. This makes it highly important to have your eCommerce store mobile-friendly. If your site looks engaging on the computer, then you can ensure that it is responsive on handheld gadgets too. Neglecting to do so can bring about a higher bounce rate and Cart Abandonment rate

Retarget Abandoners:

Our best method for recovering Shopping Cart Abandonment is to realize that a few clients will inevitably leave their carts. So you can follow them with remarketing efforts later. ‘Retargeting’ is significant for internet business retailers.

‘Facebook Remarketing’ is ideally suited for focusing on shopping cart abandoners.

As Facebook promotions are visual-based, they are great for catching the optimistic characteristics of your items to attract your visitors. Remarketing with Google AdWords and Bing Ads is an extraordinary idea. You should remarket to clients who leave their shopping carts.

There are other tips that can assist with lessening shopping cart abandonment, and the prominent one is remarketing, which assists you with winning back the potential clients you will lose en route.

Get help from Exit Popups:

 Get the guests when they attempt to leave your site, abandoning their trucks, using the Exit-Intent Popup. Exit popups are likely the most effective way to recover the Abandoned Carts.

What is enticing with regards to them is that they always give you a chance to convert a guest into a client right away when they are going to leave your site.

Through Exit Popups, you can also draw guests’ consideration towards your offerings at the last second and urge them to utilize their purchases.

The presence of an Exit Popup when the client is attempting to leave, leaving the cart abandoned, can acquire a huge change in your Cart Abandonment Rate. Hence, it is advisable to incorporate:

  • Offers
  • Game contests or opportunities to win with prizes
  • Free delivery offers
  • Downloadable content

This last-moment attempt can support your conversions to the maximum extent possible if your offers are persuading.

Here is what you can do with Exit Popups:

Track guests’ actions and trigger a popup when the guest is going to leave your site.

Toss a completely customized popup to accommodate your branding.

Display coupon code and auto-apply it when the guest clicks it.

You can also introduce an Exit-Intent Popup on any page, including the cart and checkout pages.

Think about what clients are checking out and how you can make them stay. You don’t have to carry out an Exit-Intent Popup on each page of your site, yet genuinely consider adding it to:

  • Product Pages
  • Classification Pages
  • Checkout Pages

Display Remaining Stock and Create a Sense of Urgency Intently:

Customers can be simulated by showing the leftover stock. The quantity of things left tells that the item is popular and may not be accessible later.

It makes a need to keep moving and urges clients to solidify their purchasing choice. They will move quickly and will wind up buying the item.

Another strategy that creates a sense of urgency and lessens Cart Abandonment is ‘Countdown Clocks’. Static Countdown Clocks are extraordinary when your deal has a selected end date. Dynamic Countdown Clocks give each of your guests a similar measure of time to exploit your unique offer.

That implies the clock begins when the client first sees the mission rather than starting on a particular date.

This permits you to decently make desperation for your site’s guests in general and persuade reluctant purchasers to go through the whole checkout process.

Send Abandoned Cart Emails:

Assuming a client has created a new account on your online store, you can likely contact them through email.

Use automated emails services to send Cart Recovery messages to clients who left their buys incomplete. This is another way to showcase your products and remind clients about the item they left behind.

A friendly lump will not cause any damage. It will simply make your Abandoned Cart email stand apart by:

  • Having an appealing title
  • Featuring one explicit (well known) item
  • Composing inventive copy is a decent opportunity to show your brand’s worth.
  • Provide an offer. However, be cautious with this, as the clients may generally expect an offer email after every Abandoned Cart.
  • Cart Recovery messages is a decent method if you have a rewards program. Send Cart Recovery Messages to remind clients of the reward points they have got to spend on them.

Avoid Pricing shock at the Payment Page:

Individuals generally don’t anticipate that the cart value should surpass extremely high on the installment page. Be that as it may, in some cases, the extra charges like transportation cost, conveyance charges, taxes, and hidden charges make a tremendous distinction between the item worth and the cart value.

Try to stay away from this.

Be straightforward about the general expenses. Show it forthright at the hour of adding to the cart. So, you don’t amaze your clients later and are providing them with an unmistakable thought of the total cost.

Or, on the other hand, you can just offer free delivery. This is probably the most effective way to diminish Shopping Cart Abandonment. To change the delivery cost, you can marginally expand the item cost.

Flexible Return Policy:

Most of the time, customers leave their cart as they are not happy with the business’ Return Policy. There is a craving to buy, and however, because of an unsuitable return policy, customers choose not to go  the extra mile of buying.

Have a decent and clear Return Policy. Give them adequate days to return the item, assuming it has got a few flaws. Clients will be more certain while making a purchase.

Online customers can’t actually feel the items, and nobody likes to purchase something that doesn’t appear good in person.

Assuming you don’t offer free returns yet, have a trial to sort out whether it’s something you need to do. This is the way you can start:

  1. For 15 days, offer free returns for all the items. Once the preliminary is finished, look at the number of deals created in that return period with the deals produced before it.
  2. Then deduct the expense of returns from an extended amount of deals to decide whether a flexible return policy works for your primary concern.

Keep Guest Checkouts and Social Logins:

Pushing clients to create an account at the Checkout page is one of the significant explanations behind Cart Abandonment. Why create the obstacle in the middle of an effective checkout?

Think from the shoes of the customer. Do you like to be compelled to invest extra time filling data before Checkout? While it delays the Checkout cycle, it is likewise irritating for the client.

Subsequently, it isn’t wise to constrain clients to make an account, particularly when they have numerous choices out there.

It is understood that you need to obtain the client’s information. However, requesting it by breaking the Checkout stream isn’t the best way.

So how would it be a good idea for you to do?

Offer a Guest Checkout and Social Login. By having these two choices on your Checkout page, you will diminish the cart abandonment rate. Ultimately, it also paves the way to improve the client experience.

Allow clients to look at it as a visitor if they are not happy joining. Social login, then again, supports fast signup.

Last Words:

Reducing Shopping Cart Abandonment is one of the speediest and most straightforward ways of getting additional worth from your site.

You don’t have to execute all of the above strategies. Just implementing only a couple of things will assist you with moving the right way.

It merits A/B testing the Cart Recovery techniques before settling on any firm choices. What works well for one online store may not really work for yours.

So make certain to put together any choices you make concerning real information based on your customer’s behavior.



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5 Simple Things You Can Do To Improve the Content Experience for Readers

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5 Simple Things You Can Do To Improve the Content Experience for Readers

Who doesn’t like to have a good experience consuming content?

I know I do. And isn’t that what we – as both a consumer of content and a marketer of content – all want?

What if you create such a good experience that your audience doesn’t even realize it’s an “experience?” Here’s a helpful mish-mash of easy-to-do things to make that possible.

1. Write with an inclusive heart

There’s nothing worse than being in a conversation with someone who constantly talks about themselves. Check your text to see how often you write the words – I, me, we, and us. Now, count how often the word “you” is used. If the first-person uses are disproportionate to the second-person uses, edit to delete many first-person references and add more “you” to the text.

You want to let your audience know they are included in the conversation. I like this tip shared in Take Binary Bias Out of Your Content Conversations by Content Marketing World speaker Ruth Carter: Go through your text and replace exclusionary terms such as he/him and she/her with they/them pronouns.

Go through your text and replace exclusionary terms such as he/him and she/her with they/them pronouns, says @rbcarter via @Brandlovellc @CMIContent. #WritingTips Click To Tweet

2. Make your content shine brighter with an AI assist

Content published online should look different than the research papers and essays you wrote in school. While you should adhere to grammar rules and follow a style guide as best as possible, you also should prioritize readability. That requires scannable and easily digestible text – headings, bulleted text, short sentences, brief paragraphs, etc.

Use a text-polishing aid such as Hemingway Editor (free and paid versions) to cut the dead weight from your writing. Here’s how its color-coded review system works and the improvements to make:

  • Yellow – lengthy, complex sentences, and common errors
    • Fix: Shorten or split sentences.
  • Red – dense and complicated text
    • Fix: Remove hurdles and keep your readers on a simpler path.
  • Pink – lengthy words that could be shortened
    • Fix: Scroll the mouse over the problematic word to identify potential substitutes.
  • Blue – adverbs and weakening phrases
    • Fix: Delete them or find a better way to convey the thought.
  • Green – passive voice
    • Fix: Rewrite for active voice.

Grammarly’s paid version works well, too. The premium version includes an AI-powered writing assistant, readability reports, a plagiarism checker, citation suggestions, and more than 400 additional grammar checks.

In the image below, Grammarly suggests a way to rephrase the sentence from:

“It is not good enough any longer to simply produce content “like a media company would”.

To:

“It is no longer good enough to produce content “as a media company would”.

Much cleaner, right?

3. Ask questions

See what I did with the intro (and here)? I posed questions to try to engage with you. When someone asks a question – even in writing – the person hearing (or reading) it is likely to pause for a split second to consider their answer. The reader’s role changes from a passive participant to an active one. Using this technique also can encourage your readers to interact with the author, maybe in the form of an answer in the comments.

4. Include links

Many content marketers include internal and external links in their text for their SEO value. But you also should add links to help your readers. Consider including links to help a reader who wants to learn more about the topic. You can do this in a couple of ways:

  • You can link the descriptive text in the article to content relevant to those words (as I did in this bullet point)
  • You can list the headlines of related articles as a standalone feature (see the gray box labeled Handpicked Related Content at the end of this article).

Add links to guide readers to more information on a topic – not just for SEO purposes says @Brandlovellc via @CMIContent. #WritingTips Click To Tweet

You also can include on-page links or bookmarks in the beginning (a table of contents, of sorts) in longer pieces to help the reader more quickly access the content they seek to help you learn more about a topic. This helps the reader and keeps visitors on your website longer.

5. Don’t forget the ‘invisible’ text

Alt text is often an afterthought – if you think about it all. Yet, it’s essential to have a great content experience for people who use text-to-speech readers. Though it doesn’t take too much time, I find that customizing the image description content instead of relying on the default technology works better for audience understanding.

First, ask if a listener would miss something if they didn’t have the image explained. If they wouldn’t, the image is decorative and probably doesn’t need alt text. You publish it for aesthetic reasons, such as to break up a text-heavy page. Or it may repeat information already appearing in the text (like I did in the Hemingway and Grammarly examples above).

If the listener would miss out if the image weren’t explained well, it is informative and requires alt text. General guidelines indicate up to 125 characters (including spaces) work best for alt text. That’s a short sentence or two to convey the image’s message. Don’t forget to include punctuation.

General guidelines indicate up to 125 characters (including spaces) work best for alt text, says @Brandlovellc via @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

For both decorative and informative images, include the photo credits, permissions, and copyright information, in the caption section.

For example, if I were writing an article about Best Dogs for Families, I would include an image of a mini Bernedoodle as an example because they make great family pets. Let’s use this image of my adorable puppy, Henri, and I’ll show you both a good and bad example of alt text.

An almost useless alt-text version: “An image showing a dog.”

Author’s tri-colored (brown, white, black, grey wavy hair), merle mini Bernedoodle, Henri, lying on green grass.

It wastes valuable characters with the phrase “an image showing.”

Use the available characters for a more descriptive alt text: “Author’s tri-colored (brown, white, black, grey wavy hair), merle mini Bernedoodle, Henri, lying on green grass.”

It’s more descriptive, and I only used 112 characters, including spaces.

Want to learn more? Alexa Heinrich, an award-winning social media strategist, has a helpful article on writing effective image descriptions called The Art of Alt Text. @A11yAwareness on Twitter is also a great resource for accessibility tips.

Improve your content and better the experience

Do any of these suggestions feel too hard to execute? I hope not. They don’t need a bigger budget to execute. They don’t need a lengthy approval process to implement. And they don’t demand much more time in production.

They just need you to remember to execute them the next time you write (and the time after that, and the time after that, and the … well, you get the idea.)

If you have an easy-to-implement tip to improve the content experience, please leave it in the comments. I may include it in a future update.

All tools mentioned in the article are identified by the author. If you have a tool to suggest, please feel free to add it in the comments.

If you have an idea for an original article you’d like to share with the CMI audience, you could get it published on the site. First, read our blogging guidelines and write or adjust your draft accordingly. Then submit the post for consideration following the process outlined in the guidelines.

In appreciation for guest contributors’ work, we’re offering free registration to one paid event or free enrollment in Content Marketing University to anyone who gets two new posts accepted and published on the CMI site in 2023.

HANDPICKED RELATED CONTENT:

Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute



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The Ultimate Guide to Product Marketing in 2023

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The Ultimate Guide to Product Marketing in 2023

Product marketing is essential, even if you only sell one or two products at your organization.

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3 email marketing shifts to make in 2023

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3 email marketing shifts to make in 2023

Whew! We made it to 2023! As we closed in on the end of the year in December, the finish line seemed awfully far away. Many marketers told me they were busier than ever. 

I myself was fielding calls for strategy help, working on business deals and managing the chaos all the way to the eve of Christmas Eve, something that rarely happens in my 20-plus-year career. 

Look back and celebrate, then move on

The first business for 2023 will be to step back, clear your head and take stock of all the great things you accomplished in 2022 despite the odds (i.e., coming out of COVID, going into a rebound and COVID round 2, moving into supply-chain shortages and other hiccups, facing down a potential recession) and how they affected the work you did to succeed.

And now it’s 2023. I hope you got your budget request approved and you’re ready to move ahead with a clean slate and new KPIs to hit. You’re probably wondering, “What can I do now to grow my program?

3 directional changes to grow your email program

Naturally, every marketer’s goals will be unique. We have different audiences, challenges, resources and goals. But I’m focusing on three major directional changes with my clients this year. Which of these could help you succeed this year?

1. Stop sending so many emails

Yeah, I know. That sounds strange coming from somebody who believes wholeheartedly in email and its power to build your business. But even I have my limits!

Email during this last holiday shopping season was insane. In my 20+ years in the email industry, I cannot remember a time, even during the lockdown days of COVID-19, when my inbox was so full. 

I’m not the only one who noticed. Your customers also perceived that their inboxes were getting blasted to the North Pole. And they complained about it, as the Washington Post reported (“Retailers fire off more emails than ever trying to get you to shop“).

I didn’t run any numbers to measure volume, isolate cadences or track frequency curves. But every time I turned around, I saw emails pouring into my inbox. 

My advice for everyone on frequency: If you throttled up during the holiday, now it’s time to throttle back.

This should be a regularly scheduled move. But it’s important to make sure your executives understand that higher email frequency, volume and cadence aren’t the new email norm. 

If you commit to this heavier schedule, you’ll drive yourself crazy and push your audience away, to other brands or social media.

If you did increase cadence, what did it do for you? You might have hit your numbers, but consider the long-term costs: 

  • More unsubscribes.
  • More spam complaints.
  • Deliverability problems.
  • Lower revenue per email. 

Take what you learned from your holiday cadence as an opportunity to discover whether it’s a workable strategy or only as a “break glass in case of emergency” move.

My advice? Slow down. Return to your regular volume, frequency and cadence. Think of your customers and their reactions to being inundated with emails over 60 days.

2. Stop spamming

In that Washington Post article I mentioned earlier, I was encouraged that it cited one of my email gripes — visiting websites and then getting emails without granting permission first. 

I could have given the Post a salty quote about my experiences with SafeOpt and predatory email experiences (“Business stress is no excuse to spam“) for visitors to its clients’ websites. 

Successful email marketers believe in the sanctity of permission. That permission-based practice is what you want to be involved in. Buying a list means you don’t hire a company to sell you one, whether it’s a data broker or a tech provider like SafeOpt. 

Spamming people doesn’t work in the long term. Sure, I’ve heard stories from people who say they use purchased lists or companies like SafeOpt and it makes them money. But that’s a singular view of the impact. 

Email is the only marketing channel where you can do it wrong but still make money. But does that make it right? 

The problem with the “it made us money” argument is that there’s nowhere to go after that. Are you measuring how many customers you lost because you spammed them or the hits your sender reputation took? 

You might hit a short-term goal but lose the long-term battle. When you become known as an unreliable sender, you risk losing access to your customers’ inboxes.

Aside from the permission violation, emailing visitors after they leave your site is a wasted effort for three reasons:

  • A visit is not the same as intent. You don’t know why they landed on your site. Maybe they typed your URL as a mistake or discovered immediately that your brand wasn’t what they wanted. Chasing them with emails won’t bring them back.
  • You aren’t measuring interest. Did they visit multiple pages or check out your “About” or FAQ pages? As with intent, just landing on a page doesn’t signal interest.
  • They didn’t give you their email address. If they had interest or intent, they would want to connect with your brand. No email address, no permission.

Good email practice holds that email performs best when it’s permission-based. Most ESPs and ISPs operate on that principle, as do many email laws and regulations.

But even in the U.S., where opt-out email is still legal, that doesn’t mean you should send an email without permission just because somebody landed on your website.

3. Do one new thing

Many email marketers will start the year with a list of 15 things they want to do over the next two months. I try to temper those exuberant visions by focusing on achievable goals with this question: 

“What one thing could you do this year that could make a great difference in your email program’s success?”

When I started a job as head of strategy for Acxiom, I wanted to come up with a long list of goals to impress my new boss. I showed it to my mentor, the great David Baker and he said, “Can you guarantee that you can do all of these things and not just do them but hit them out of the park?”

Hmmmm…

“That’s why you don’t put down that many goals,” he said. “Go in with just one. When that one is done, come up with the next one. Then do another. If you propose five projects, your boss will assume you will do five projects. If you don’t, it just means you didn’t get it done.”

That was some of the best advice I’ve ever received and I pass it on to you. 

Come up with one goal, project or change that will drive your program forward. Take it to your boss and say, “Here’s what I’m going to do this year.”

To find that one project, look at your martech and then review MarTech’s six most popular articles from 2022 for expert advice.

You’ll find plenty of ideas and tips to help you nail down your one big idea to drive growth and bring success. But be realistic. You don’t know what events could affect your operations. 

Drive your email program forward in 2023

The new year has barely begun, but I had a little trouble getting motivated to take on what’s shaping up to be a beast of a year. You, too?

I enjoyed my time off over the holidays. Got in some golf with my dad and his buddies, ate great food and took time to step back and appreciate the phenomenal people I work with and our amazing industry. 

What gets me going at last? Reaching out to my team, friends and you. Much of my motivation comes from fellow marketers — what you need, what you worry about and what I can do to help you succeed. 

If you’re on the struggle bus with me, borrow some motivation from your coworkers and teammates, so we can gather together 12 months from now and toast each other for making it through another year. 

It’s time to strap on your marketer helmet and hit the starter. Here’s to another great year together. Let’s get the job done!


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Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily MarTech. Staff authors are listed here.


About the author

Ryan Phelan

As the co-founder of RPEOrigin.com, Ryan Phelan’s two decades of global marketing leadership has resulted in innovative strategies for high-growth SaaS and Fortune 250 companies. His experience and history in digital marketing have shaped his perspective on creating innovative orchestrations of data, technology and customer activation for Adestra, Acxiom, Responsys, Sears & Kmart, BlueHornet and infoUSA. Working with peers to advance digital marketing and mentoring young marketers and entrepreneurs are two of Ryan’s passions. Ryan is the Chairman Emeritus of the Email Experience Council Advisory Board and a member of numerous business community groups. He is also an in-demand keynote speaker and thought leader on digital marketing.

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