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NBCUniversal launches comprehensive NBCUnified platform

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NBCUniversal launches comprehensive NBCUnified platform


At CES, NBCUniversal announced the launch of NBCUnified, a first-party identity platform that pulls together consumer data from across the company’s wide-ranging touchpoints, including premium video content, e-commerce, sports, subscriptions and theme parks.

NBCUnified is made up of three main components – the NBCU ID, the Data Marketplace and Partner Integrations. Marketers will be able to reach consumers with deep knowledge based on the first-party data and insights that come from more than 230 million monthly users across all of NBCUniversal’s commercial channels.

The NBCU ID, which was first introduced last March, has over 150 million unique person-level IDs, and is on pace to grow to over 200 million by 2023. The Data Marketplace taps into thousands of consumer behavior attributes and can be combined with a network of licensed third-party providers.

Read next: Best Buy announces in-house ad network

The Partner Integrations piece, according to the company, acts as a “fully interoperable platform” that is privacy-minded and allows marketers to responsibly benefit from third-party data from agency and tech partners, as well as NBCUniversal’s own proprietary clean rooms.

Why we care. We’ve already seen how some large national retailers like Best Buy and Walgreens have launched advertising platforms that leverage their vast store of customer data for outside advertisers.

Because of NBCUniversal’s focus on entertainment, their NBCUnified offering is more diverse and potentially engaging to consumers than feeding retail customers additional ads in-store or on the store’s app. But the same overarching principle applies. First-party data is more valuable than ever, and if you want to leverage that value, there are ways through data partnerships with right tech partners to unlock that data for paying advertisers.

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About The Author

Chris Wood draws on over 15 years of reporting experience as a B2B editor and journalist. At DMN, he served as associate editor, offering original analysis on the evolving marketing tech landscape. He has interviewed leaders in tech and policy, from Canva CEO Melanie Perkins, to former Cisco CEO John Chambers, and Vivek Kundra, appointed by Barack Obama as the country’s first federal CIO. He is especially interested in how new technologies, including voice and blockchain, are disrupting the marketing world as we know it. In 2019, he moderated a panel on “innovation theater” at Fintech Inn, in Vilnius. In addition to his marketing-focused reporting in industry trades like Robotics Trends, Modern Brewery Age and AdNation News, Wood has also written for KIRKUS, and contributes fiction, criticism and poetry to several leading book blogs. He studied English at Fairfield University, and was born in Springfield, Massachusetts. He lives in New York.



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MARKETING

B2B buyers are much more concerned about a company’s values than the general public

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B2B buyers are much more concerned about a company's values than the general public

B2B marketers take note: 72% of your buyers say they are more likely to buy from socially responsible businesses, according to a recent survey. That’s 17 points higher than the general public. 

Additionally, 48% of B2B buyers say they’re “much more likely to” buy from these firms, compared to 29% of consumers. There’s a big gender gap on this among the B2B population, but not the one you might expect: 57% of men are in the “much more likely” group, compared to  35% of women, according to the American Marketing Association-New York “Future of Marketing” study. 

Read next: What are diversity, equity and inclusion, and why do marketers need them?

These folks are more than willing to put the company’s money behind this: 73% say they don’t mind if it costs them more. We’re not talking just a slight increase, either. Some 38% would pay prices more than 10% higher and 17% would be OK with an additional 25% or more. This is a considerable difference from the general public where the numbers are 23% and 10% respectively.

Furthermore, the bigger the purchase, the more buyers who respond strongly to brand purpose. Only 35% of those whose last purchase was under $10,000, are in the more likely to buy group. That group expands to 54% of those who spent between $10,000 and $100,000, and 62% of those whose last buy was over $100,000.

Most important issues

The most important issues for buyers:

  • Being a good employer (34%).
  • Corporate citizenship (27%).
  • Sustainability and environmental protection (24%).
  • Racial equality (23%).
  • Workplace diversity (23%).
  • Protecting voting and democracy (22%).
  • Women’s rights (15%).
  • Criminal justice reform (13%).
  • LGBTQ+ issues (10%).

Workplace diversity is considerably more important to B2B buyers than the general public (23% to 15%). 

While the current group of B2B buyers looks like it usually has, that’s very likely to change. Right now the average corporate buyer is mostly under 40 (65%) and male (60%). However, women make up 53% of the under-30s (as well as 56% of the over-50s). They’re also in the majority at companies with fewer than 50 workers (59%) and those with more than 5,000 (54%). 

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Why we care. The title of the study is “The new B2B: Omni-channel, tech-friendly and woke.” However one cares to define that last word, it is not one usually associated with B2B. That’s very important for focusing marketing and for the world at large. For marketers it means making sales and the C-suite understand that all of the business’s actions have an impact on the bottom line. For the rest of us it means there’s a powerful market force pushing for greater corporate responsibility.


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About The Author

Constantine von Hoffman is managing editor of MarTech. A veteran journalist, Con has covered business, finance, marketing and tech for CBSNews.com, Brandweek, CMO, and Inc. He has been city editor of the Boston Herald, news producer at NPR, and has written for Harvard Business Review, Boston Magazine, Sierra, and many other publications. He has also been a professional stand-up comedian, given talks at anime and gaming conventions on everything from My Neighbor Totoro to the history of dice and boardgames, and is author of the magical realist novel John Henry the Revelator. He lives in Boston with his wife, Jennifer, and either too many or too few dogs.

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