Connect with us

NEWS

Wix and WordPress Tensions Rise

Published

on

Wix and WordPress Tensions Rise

Wix and WordPress have been engaging in a public spat that keeps getting nastier with each response. A new response from Wix seems to lower the temperature on the dispute.

The latest round of open letters between WordPress and Wix was instigated by a series of polarizing video ads created by Wix.

The ads were generally poorly received in the web development and search marketing community. But others found the ads to be humorous.

The biggest complaint seemed to be that the ads were inappropriately negative against WordPress, a popular and beloved open source content management system. Some wished that Wix had taken a higher road with their ads.

Matt Mullenweg Responds

Matt Mullenweg is the developer behind WordPress and the founder of Automattic, a company that creates a variety of popular web and WordPress related offerings.

Matt also founded the WordPress Foundation, a non-profit organization that supports and protects the free WordPress content management system.

The response by Matt was understandably passionate.

In an essay entitled, Wix and Their Dirty Tricks, he set the table by painting Wix as thieves.

Advertisement

He begins by reminding readers that Wix were the ones who were accused of “stealing WordPress code and lying about it.”

He follows up by accusing Wix of trying to gain relevance by attacking the open source WordPress community and expresses empathy for the actors and workers involved who were “forced” to make the Wix attack ads.

That’s just the first two paragraphs.

Matt then lays into Wix’s business model, remarking on how it’s based on trapping clients by making it difficult to escape to a different system, comparing Wix to a trap for vermin.

He wrote:

“They are so insecure that they are also the only website creator I’m aware of that doesn’t allow you to export your content, so they’re like a roach motel where you can check in but never check out. “

Next he paints a picture of Wix as an abusive partner that imprisons their clients in a basement and expresses surprise that consumer protection agencies haven’t yet gone after Wix for their business practices.

The essay ends by accusing Wix of being creepy and misleading in how they are choosing to represent themselves.

Wix Responds

Given how gleefully negative and outrageous the Wix attack ads were, the Wix response from the CEO, Avishai Abrahami, was refreshingly sober and focused on facts.

Advertisement

I asked a friend with 25 years in the search marketing business to read the Wix response and he remarked that he found it “nice and sane.”

The open letter from Wix to WordPress begins by noting the prevalence of anger and “half-truths” in the essay by Matt and asks,

“Why are you so angry?”

The Wix CEO sets his table by painting Matt Mullenweg as angry and not telling the truth, while presenting Wix as fair and sticking to facts.

The issues with WordPress that he cites are:

  • High maintenance
  • Problematic plugins
  • Memory issues
  • Security

Hypocrisy and Friendly Competition

Avishai accuses Matt Mullenweg of being hypocritical for criticizing Wix for negativity by claiming it was Matt that begun the bitter exchanges by being first to go on a negative attack.

He portrayed WordPress as the initial aggressor and Wix as simply responding to the negativity from WordPress.

To prove his point that WordPress engages in negativity he links to two WordPress.com web pages:

https://WordPress.com/compare/wix/

https://WordPress.com/go/tips/WordPress-vs-wix-everything-you-need-to-know/

Advertisement

Next he portrayed Wix as being open to criticism and eager to learn from it.

He wrote:

“I believe in friendly competition. Competitors push each other by competing. When you guys wrote about issues with Wix, like SEO and performance, we didn’t complain, we owned it and worked hard to fix it. Now we have great SEO, and performance is almost where it should be – so thank you WordPress for pushing us to be better.”

Then he asks WordPress why can’t they do the same to own their issues and work to improve them.

That question could be said to be unfair because the issues with security and plugins are outside of the direct control of WordPress itself.

Problematic plugins are developed by third parties and are not under the direct control of WordPress itself. So it’s hard for WordPress to “own” something it doesn’t actually own.

Did Wix Steal WordPress’ Code?

Wix addresses the accusation that they stole WordPress code by relating that they did not steal “General Public License” code and noted that they had addressed this accusation five years ago.

“I’d like to remind you that the code wasn’t developed by WordPress – it was General Public License (GPL).

We didn’t steal it, and we gave it back according to GPL (JavaScript is not linked).

As a reminder, here’s my reply to you about it from 5 years ago.”

Advertisement

Does Wix Lock Users In?

Wix CEO Avishai Abrahami refutes the claim that Wix locks users in and linked to a WordPress.com tool for importing content from Wix to WordPress.

WordPress Hosts a Wix Site Import Tool

Aviashai linked to a WordPress tool for importing Wix websites.

https://wordpress.com/support/import/import-from-wix/

This is what the WordPress Wix site import tool says:

Import »Import from Wix

Our Wix Importer is a quick way to move your content. All you have to do is provide your site’s web address (called a URL).

When the import is complete, you’ll have a site that’s pre-filled with your content and ready to be your new home on the web.”

Referencing WordPress’ tool for importing Wix content, Avishai asks:

“Do you remember this? So why did you write that we lock our users in the basement?”

Wix Offers Apology

The CEO later affirms his belief in “friendly competition” and the benefit of businesses challenging each other to be better.

Advertisement
 

He states that highlighting the “problems” with WordPress was meant in the spirit of friendly competition but he also offers an olive branch in the form of an apology.

He wrote:

“We tried to make the ads funny, and I think you can also admit that the problems we talk about are real. However, if it offended you, I’m sorry.”

The open letter then ends by recounting that he has unsuccessfully invited Matt for coffee over the past few years.

Response to Wix Open Letter

Most of the responses fell along polarized lines.

But there were a few who seemed able to see the truth in both sides.

One person tweeted:

Later in the Twitter discussion he quoted the part of the Wix response that he felt was spot on, while following up with what he disagreed with in the Wix open letter:

Criticism of Wix

As mentioned earlier, the response appeared to be polarized and some of the responses seemed to be quibbling about details but not directly with the point being made by Wix.

For example, one person took issue at Avishai referring to the WordPress developers as “you guys” in a sentence the state of SEO friendliness of the Wix platform.

Less Finger Pointing and More Coffee

Several people felt like both sides make valid points but both need to stop pointing fingers at the other and instead focus on their own issues.

Many people were taken aback by the negativity and arguably poor taste of the Wix advertisements. It seemed to mark an escalation of tensions between WordPress and Wix.

There’s so much negativity in the world today it doesn’t make sense to add more of it in the form of nasty videos and finger pointing. Maybe it’s time to move on?

Searchenginejournal.com

NEWS

Google December Product Reviews Update Affects More Than English Language Sites? via @sejournal, @martinibuster

Published

on

Google’s Product Reviews update was announced to be rolling out to the English language. No mention was made as to if or when it would roll out to other languages. Mueller answered a question as to whether it is rolling out to other languages.

Google December 2021 Product Reviews Update

On December 1, 2021, Google announced on Twitter that a Product Review update would be rolling out that would focus on English language web pages.

The focus of the update was for improving the quality of reviews shown in Google search, specifically targeting review sites.

A Googler tweeted a description of the kinds of sites that would be targeted for demotion in the search rankings:

“Mainly relevant to sites that post articles reviewing products.

Think of sites like “best TVs under $200″.com.

Goal is to improve the quality and usefulness of reviews we show users.”

Advertisement

Advertisement



Continue Reading Below

Google also published a blog post with more guidance on the product review update that introduced two new best practices that Google’s algorithm would be looking for.

The first best practice was a requirement of evidence that a product was actually handled and reviewed.

The second best practice was to provide links to more than one place that a user could purchase the product.

The Twitter announcement stated that it was rolling out to English language websites. The blog post did not mention what languages it was rolling out to nor did the blog post specify that the product review update was limited to the English language.

Google’s Mueller Thinking About Product Reviews Update

Screenshot of Google's John Mueller trying to recall if December Product Review Update affects more than the English languageScreenshot of Google's John Mueller trying to recall if December Product Review Update affects more than the English language

Product Review Update Targets More Languages?

The person asking the question was rightly under the impression that the product review update only affected English language search results.

Advertisement

Continue Reading Below

Advertisement



But he asserted that he was seeing search volatility in the German language that appears to be related to Google’s December 2021 Product Review Update.

This is his question:

“I was seeing some movements in German search as well.

So I was wondering if there could also be an effect on websites in other languages by this product reviews update… because we had lots of movement and volatility in the last weeks.

…My question is, is it possible that the product reviews update affects other sites as well?”

John Mueller answered:

“I don’t know… like other languages?

My assumption was this was global and and across all languages.

But I don’t know what we announced in the blog post specifically.

But usually we try to push the engineering team to make a decision on that so that we can document it properly in the blog post.

Advertisement



I don’t know if that happened with the product reviews update. I don’t recall the complete blog post.

But it’s… from my point of view it seems like something that we could be doing in multiple languages and wouldn’t be tied to English.

And even if it were English initially, it feels like something that is relevant across the board, and we should try to find ways to roll that out to other languages over time as well.

So I’m not particularly surprised that you see changes in Germany.

But I also don’t know what we actually announced with regards to the locations and languages that are involved.”

Does Product Reviews Update Affect More Languages?

While the tweeted announcement specified that the product reviews update was limited to the English language the official blog post did not mention any such limitations.

Google’s John Mueller offered his opinion that the product reviews update is something that Google could do in multiple languages.

One must wonder if the tweet was meant to communicate that the update was rolling out first in English and subsequently to other languages.

Advertisement



It’s unclear if the product reviews update was rolled out globally to more languages. Hopefully Google will clarify this soon.

Citations

Google Blog Post About Product Reviews Update

Product reviews update and your site

Google’s New Product Reviews Guidelines

Write high quality product reviews

John Mueller Discusses If Product Reviews Update Is Global

Watch Mueller answer the question at the 14:00 Minute Mark

[embedded content]Searchenginejournal.com

Continue Reading




DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending

en_USEnglish