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E-A-T – Google Adds Experience To Revised Search Quality Raters Guidelines

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Google May Update The Webmaster Guidelines In 2022

The Google search quality raters guidelines were updated and updated in a big way, with a new E added on to E-A-T. Google is adding experience on top of expertise, authoritativeness, and trustworthiness. Google said that trust is the most important of all four elements here.

Adding an E, led to the document getting 9-pages bigger, the PDF document is now 176-page PDF from 167-page PDF in July 2022, from 172 pages in 2021 and 175 pages in 2020.

What Changed In The Document

Here is what changed, mostly based on the final page of the revised PDF that documents the changes:

  • Double-E-A-T – adding the experience topics to the PDF is the big one (more on “experience” below).
  • Google also “broadly refreshed concepts and rating criteria in “Part 1: Page Quality Guideline” to be more explicitly applicable to all types of websites and content creation models.
  • Clarified guidance on “Finding Who is Responsible for the Website and Who Created the Content on the Page” for different webpage types.
  • Added summary table with the top “Page Quality Considerations” involved in PQ (Page Quality) rating, which carry through to each PQ rating section (Lowest to Highest)
  • Refined/expanded guidance on the following core pillars of Page Quality Rating:
    • Main Content Quality
    • Reputation for Websites and Content Creators
    • Experience, Expertise, Authoritativeness, and Trust (E-E-A-T)
  • Reordered PQ rating sections from Lowest to Highest; streamlined transitions
    between these sections; de-duped existing guidance and examples as appropriate
  • Added more guidance and clarifications to sections: “Pages with Error Messages
    or No MC”, “Forums and Q&A Pages”, and “Page Quality Rating FAQs.”
  • Reformatted lists of concepts and examples into tables (throughout/as appropriate)
  • Minor changes throughout (updated language, examples, and explanations for
    consistency across sections; removed outdated examples; fixed typos; etc.)

Previous Quality Rater Guidelines

Here are the previous versions, compared to the live version:

More On Experience in E-E-A-T

As I covered on Search Engine Land yesterday, Google said experience adds another level of quality to assess its search results. What is Google looking for with experience? Google said when you write the content, does that “content also demonstrate that it was produced with some degree of experience, such as with actual use of a product, having actually visited a place or communicating what a person experienced?” Google explained that there are “some situations where really what you value most is content produced by someone who has first-hand, life experience on the topic at hand.”

Google shared this example, “if you’re looking for information on how to correctly fill out your tax returns, that’s probably a situation where you want to see content produced by an expert in the field of accounting. But if you’re looking for reviews of a tax preparation software, you might be looking for a different kind of information—maybe it’s a forum discussion from people who have experience with different services.”

Google said in the updated guidelines that Experience, Expertise and Authoritativeness are important concepts that can support your assessment of trust, with trust being the most important member of E-E-A-T. Google said, “trust is the most important member of the E-E-A-T family because untrustworthy pages have low E-E-A-T no matter how Experienced, Expert, or Authoritative they may seem.”

But how does “experience” differ from “expertise?” Google said, “pages that share first-hand life experience on clear YMYL topics may be considered to have high E-E-A-T as long as the content is trustworthy, safe, and consistent with well-established expert consensus. In contrast, some types of YMYL information and advice must come from experts.”

“Pages on YMYL topics can be created for a wide variety of different purposes,” Google wrote. “If the purpose of a page on a clear YMYL topic is to give information or offer advice, a high level of expertise may be required for the page to be trustworthy. However, sometimes pages on YMYL topics are created to share personal experiences, often regarding difficult life challenges. People turn to each other in times of need to share their own experience, seek comfort or inspiration, and learn from others. Factual information from experts and authoritative sources may not satisfy this need,” Google explained.

Here is the diagram Google created to illustrate this on page 26 of the PDF:

click for full size

Change Log

Here is the changelog of sorts from Google (click to enlarge):

click for full size

Lily Ray did a much deeper dive in her story at Search Engine Land.

Forum discussion at Twitter.

Source: www.seroundtable.com

SEARCHENGINES

Microsoft Bing ChatGPT Search Interface Screenshots?

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Bing Chat

Owen Yin shared some screenshots of what he said he saw on the Microsoft Bing website. It looks like the beta version of the upcoming ChatGPT features that we are all expecting Bing to announce in the coming weeks (maybe even this coming Tuesday).

Owen shared these screenshots on Twitter and then posted more details on Medium.

Here is the home page screenshot that widens and enlarges the search box and says “Ask me anything”:

click for full size

Here is his screenshot of the results, the answers being returned:

click for full size

And here is the GIF he made of this:

Bing Search Chat Interface

It would not surprise me if this is being tested in the wild by Microsoft Bing, as all the evidence leads to a big announcement about this type of feature being released sometime in the next week or so.

Forum discussion at Twitter.



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Google Revamps The Canonicalization Search Help Documentation

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Google Cluster Grapes

Google has updated its search help documentation around canonicalization this morning. The Google Search Relations team split in three distinct sections and updated a lot of the content to provide clearer details around how Google Search and canonicalization works.

The three sections include:

All of this use to be on a single help page, which you can review on the Wayback Machine over here to compare.

With this, Gary Illyes from Google dropped another LinkedIn tip on the topic of canonicalization, he wrote:

Friday ramble: you can stack canonicalization signals to strengthen that hint.

You have a rel=canonical pointing from A to B, but A is HTTPS, it’s in your hreflang clusters, all your links are pointing to A, and A is included in your sitemaps instead of B. Which one should search engines pick as canonical, A or B?

If you just change the URLs from A to B in your sitemaps and hreflang clusters, combined with that rel=canonical it might already be enough to tip over canonicalization to B. Change the links also, and you have an even greater chance to convince search engines about your canonical preference.

Recently, Gary also mentioned to use absoluate URLs for rel-canonical.

So check out these new docs and learn a bit more on canonicalization and Google Search.

Forum discussion at LinkedIn.

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Microsoft Bing’s New BingBot Now Fully Live Today

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Bingbot

As a reminder, since April, Bing has been slowly testing a new BingBot user agent, slowly rolling it out to more percentages of crawls over the year. It should have rolled out to 100% of all crawls last month. But now Fabrice Canel said this week that it is near 100%, and an announcement is coming sometime today from Microsoft.

Fabrice Canel from Microsoft Bing wrote on Twitter, “We are near 100% and are proactively monitoring and rolling back any website having issues. Stay tuned for more communication Friday.”

Initially, Bing said it would be rolled out by Fall 2022, then January 2023. Maybe today is the day?

Here has been the rollout so far:

  • April 2022: Less than 5% of crawls
  • July 2022: 5% of all crawls
  • September 2022: 20% of all crawls
  • October 2022: 50% of all crawls
  • February 2023: New 100% of all crawls

Let’s see what Fabrice announces today.

Forum discussion at Twitter.

Update: Confirmed, it is fully live according to Fabrice on LinkedIn.



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