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6 SEO Content Writing Tips For Law Firms

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6 SEO Content Writing Tips For Law Firms

How often should law firms write new content? The answer depends on their goals.

They should create informative content often if they want to get more leads or increase sales.

To improve their brand image and reputation, they should create in-depth, high-quality content more slowly (but still regularly).

Content marketing is one of the main pillars of modern marketing strategies.

To reach out to potential clients, law firms must produce high-quality content. This article offers six simple search engine optimization (SEO) content writing tips for law firms.

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Writing Effective Content For Law Firm Clients

Content marketing has become increasingly important for law firms.

Lawyers manage complex legal situations daily, but many of their clients do not.

No matter a person’s circumstances, needing a lawyer will likely induce stress. Seeking a lawyer’s services can be a highly emotional experience, depending on the details of the situation.

As a result, people probably won’t choose the first lawyer they see; they will do the work and research the right lawyer for them.

The Decision-Making Process

Before deciding, potential clients need to feel like this lawyer is someone they can trust and rely on during a difficult time.

Building trust and authority is perhaps the most critical purpose of content marketing for law firms.

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Law firms have the perfect opportunity to show off their skills and encourage potential clients to use their services through well-written content.

Blogs are one of the primary ways to deliver this information online.

The blog posts may decide whether an individual on the fence will make that call and hire the firm.

Therefore, the content must be fresh, authoritative, and relevant to the firm’s target audience. The proper selection of topics, accurate details, and natural, engaging writing can make all the difference.

A robust, quality content strategy can help the firm’s website ascend on search engine results pages (SERPs) and ideally begin pulling in more and higher-quality clients.

1. Write For Topics Over Keywords

Usually, the first concepts that come to mind when thinking about starting a piece of SEO content are keywords and keyword research.

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All written SEO content needs to have a target keyword phrase. This is how clients find content organically when they search online.

But gone are the days when keywords were all needed to get a piece of content to rank on Google.

Today, we use keywords to tell Google what some of the ideas in our content are, but we do not write our content around keywords. That is not why they are there.

Google has gotten smarter with how it interprets queries, and so have people when it comes to evaluating the quality of the results they get.

Writing around SEO keywords is an institution from a previous age, and content that does this will stand out for all the wrong reasons.

Instead, law firm blog content should focus on actual topics that relate to the legal industry.

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Writing for topics helps to match content to what potential clients are searching for more than keywords alone ever could.

When you write for topics over keywords, it can target multiple keyword phrases, not just one per blog post.

So, how is this done?

Law firms can take several approaches. Tools such as Answer the Public and Semrush’s topic research feature can help to generate content ideas based on key phrases.

Or you can search the topic you are writing about and review Google’s SERPs to see what is already ranking and how the content is presented. You can also check out what your competitors are writing about for inspiration.

These methods can guide you toward content that directly addresses clients’ questions. But then, it’ll be up to you to improve your law firm’s blog content.

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How do you do that? By laser-focusing your topic research to the needs of your audience and then writing the post like a pro. Let’s dive into how you can accomplish this.

2. Define Client Personas

What’s the point of putting time and effort into writing a piece of content without directing it toward a specific audience?

SEO beginners might think their target audience is everyone on the internet, but only a select group of online users are looking for lawyer services.

To focus on creating a tailored target market – people who need to hire an attorney – we need to determine the different client personas. A client persona represents the types of people who would be the best clients for your law firm.

Client personas vary significantly between law firms, depending on the type of law. This is why you must look at the client personas specifically for your law firm.

You should already know your firm’s target client personas well. You know who your clients are and what their needs are.

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By understanding who you are writing for, you will have a better chance of creating something relevant and valuable for prospective clients.

Start by asking yourself:

  • What challenges are your clients going through to make them need legal services?
  • What kind of people will run into these challenges in the first place?
  • And what type of information do you think they would be searching for?

Questions like these are essential when defining client personas.

Determining Demographics

It would help if you also used Google Analytics. And if you utilize social media, you can also look into each platform’s insights.

These resources can help you determine the demographics of your web traffic and followers, which can also lead you closer to your target client personas.

The demographics you find might include:

  • Age.
  • Gender.
  • Geographic location.
  • Job title and salary.
  • Education level.
  • Family dynamic.
  • Areas of interest.

3. Types Of Content To Create

SEO content often refers to the written word, but not always. Here are some significant types of SEO content:

Blog Posts

The content writing most people will already be familiar with is blog posts. Blog content can attract traffic to a website.

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It’s a straightforward way of earning the trust of potential clients by simply communicating with them about a topic they care about.

Choose the keywords carefully and use internal links to point back to the website’s top-level pages, which would be your firm’s main legal service pages.

Blog posts allow a firm to expand upon those legal subjects by adding details, providing examples, or reflecting on recent developments in legal cases.

Location Pages

Law firms can also benefit from creating location pages that target certain cities or other geographical areas.

The firm’s location pages do not have to target every local municipality on the map.

Of course, key locations are essential, but remember that people may only travel a relatively short distance to access the services of a high-quality lawyer.

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To set a geographical barrier, you should try to target your client personas in a city 10 to 20 miles circumference from your offices.

Audio & Visual Content

The written word is a handy SEO tool, but don’t forget audio and visuals. They’re not a new trend, but podcasts continue to grow in popularity.

If you want to stay on top of current content-stacking trends, you’ll want to bring up the idea of a podcast for your firm.

Creating podcasts based on existing written content and the firm’s specialized knowledge can add variety to your legal content.

Podcasts are relatively easy to produce since you don’t have to worry about perfecting any visual elements. You can hire a freelancer to edit them so the audio and transitions are consistent.

You can have some of your firm’s attorneys get on the air and discuss a legal subject. And create episodes highlighting topics people may want to know more about.

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For example, have them explain the types of bankruptcies or personal injuries to educate the public. And over time, people will see the law firm as an authority in its particular area, which can drive leads.

Similarly, videos can cover the same information as a written or audio piece but provide the public with an engaging visual experience. This will also help potential clients build a relationship with your firm by putting a face to the name of your content.

People tend to retain visuals over text, so perhaps a lawyer can explain a concept using a chart or graph, which you integrate into the video. This can help people to understand an idea more fully.

4. Essential Qualities Of Great Content

When writing law firm content, you should know what’s needed to make the piece high-quality. So aside from the heavy SEO stuff, blog posts, service, and location pages must include the basics of effective writing.

Who will trust attorneys who confidently publish grammar mistakes on their websites?

Additionally, remember that while your firm might have a lot to say on various legal topics, potential clients probably won’t be able to digest too much information all at once.

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Ensuring that the content is readable for your target audience is key to making it effective.

For example, if you want to discuss a complicated topic, try creating a blog series for it. That way, you can ensure your clients fully grasp the subject one piece at a time.

You should also ensure that any content you produce is accurate to the last detail since the public could construe it as legal advice and follow it to the letter. Google pays particular attention to any content that may affect a search user’s livelihood.

All content should end with a call to action that tells readers what to do next. Those can help the content convert more people into legitimate leads.

Remember that all legal content you create for your firm must have someone you can trust to edit the work. And it should be edited more than once, with multiple sets of eyes looking it over, so you don’t miss any simple mistakes.

The editor should be familiar with all the basics of a well-written piece and the elements that make the content SEO-friendly.

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5. Promoting Your Content

Ideally, if you’ve done everything correctly, you’ll have potential clients finding your content organically when they look for legal information.

Of course, this is what you hope for when you publish any content, but it sometimes isn’t enough to post something and have that be the end of it.

Content often needs a nudge to be impactful. So, after creating a piece of content, the next step is to promote it.

For example, you can increase your website’s traffic by promoting blog posts across Facebook, LinkedIn, and other social media platforms.

Sharing new content on your social media channels is an easy way of putting it in front of an audience and ensuring you’ll continuously have something to post.

But social media isn’t the only place you want to share your content. One of the most fitting places to promote content is via email.

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If your email list sends out the new content, it can help remind people that your firm is an excellent choice for legal aid.

6. Measuring Conversions

After you’ve created content for your law firm, you will want to measure if it’s working.

Generally, the goal of writing content is to bring in new clients. There are a few ways you can measure your content.

Tools such as Google Analytics are available to help you get accurate information regarding the impact of SEO content on sales.

You can also talk to your firm’s lawyers to check on the quality of their inbound leads since publishing the content.

Checking conversions provides vital information you can use for your future content strategy.

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However, patience is integral to SEO content writing, so you might not immediately see results.

Everyone would like excellent results on the first try. But it might take time for your law firm to find footing when beginning its content strategy.

So, taking a few attempts might be stressful, but it will pay off when you do it right.

Final Takeaways

Law firms should remember that content is king. Never underestimate the power of well-written blog posts or uniquely crafted videos and podcasts.

By focusing on producing these types of content, you can gain access to a broader audience and hone in on the target client persona while building authority.

So, if you want to increase your web presence and improve your SERP rankings, these content marketing tips can help.

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Top Priorities, Challenges, And Opportunities

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Top Priorities, Challenges, And Opportunities

The world of search has seen massive change recently. Whether you’re still in the planning stages for this year or underway with your 2024 strategy, you need to know the new SEO trends to stay ahead of seismic search industry shifts.

It’s time to chart a course for SEO success in this changing landscape.

Watch this on-demand webinar as we explore exclusive survey data from today’s top SEO professionals and digital marketers to inform your strategy this year. You’ll also learn how to navigate SEO in the era of AI, and how to gain an advantage with these new tools.

You’ll hear:

  • The top SEO priorities and challenges for 2024.
  • The role of AI in SEO – how to get ahead of the anticipated disruption of SGE and AI overall, plus SGE-specific SEO priorities.
  • Winning SEO resourcing strategies and reporting insights to fuel success.

With Shannon Vize and Ryan Maloney, we’ll take a deep dive into the top trends, priorities, and challenges shaping the future of SEO.

Discover timely insights and unlock new SEO growth potential in 2024.

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View the slides below or check out the full webinar for all the details.

Join Us For Our Next Webinar!

10 Successful Ways To Improve Your SERP Rankings [With Ahrefs]

Reserve your spot and discover 10 quick and easy SEO wins to boost your site’s rankings.

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E-E-A-T’s Google Ranking Influence Decoded

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E-E-A-T's Google Ranking Influence Decoded

The idea that something is not a ranking factor that nevertheless plays a role in ranking websites seems to be logically irreconcilable. Despite seeming like a paradox that cancels itself out, SearchLiaison recently tweeted some comments that go a long way to understanding how to think about E-E-A-T and apply it to SEO.

What A Googler Said About E-E-A-T

Marie Haynes published a video excerpt on YouTube from an event at which a Googler spoke, essentially doubling down on the importance of E-A-T.

This is what he said:

“You know this hasn’t always been there in Google and it’s something that we developed about ten to twelve or thirteen years ago. And it really is there to make sure that along the lines of what we talked about earlier is that it really is there to ensure that the content that people consume is going to be… it’s not going to be harmful and it’s going to be useful to the user. These are principles that we live by every single day.

And E-A-T, that template of how we rate an individual site based off of Expertise, Authoritativeness and Trustworthiness, we do it to every single query and every single result. So it’s actually very pervasive throughout everything that we do .

I will say that the YMYL queries, the Your Money or Your Life Queries, such as you know when I’m looking for a mortgage or when I’m looking for the local ER,  those we have a particular eye on and we pay a bit more attention to those queries because clearly they’re some of the most important decisions that people can make.

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So I would say that E-A-T has a bit more of an impact there but again, I will say that E-A-T applies to everything, every single query that we actually look at.”

How can something be a part of every single search query and not be a ranking factor, right?

Background, Experience & Expertise In Google Circa 2012

Something to consider is that in 2012 Google’s senior engineer at the time, Matt Cutts, said that experience and expertise brings a measure of quality to content and makes it worthy of ranking.

Matt Cutts’ remarks on experience and expertise were made in an interview with Eric Enge.

Discussing whether the website of a hypothetical person named “Jane” deserves to rank with articles that are original variations of what’s already in the SERPs.

Matt Cutts observed:

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“While they’re not duplicates they bring nothing new to the table.

Google would seek to detect that there is no real differentiation between these results and show only one of them so we could offer users different types of sites in the other search results.

They need to ask themselves what really is their value add? …they need to figure out what… makes them special.

…if Jane is just churning out 500 words about a topic where she doesn’t have any background, experience or expertise, a searcher might not be as interested in her opinion.”

Matt then cites the example of Pulitzer Prize-Winning movie reviewer Roger Ebert as a person with the background, experience and expertise that makes his opinion valuable to readers and the content worthy of ranking.

Matt didn’t say that a webpage author’s background, experience and expertise were ranking factors. But he did say that these are the kinds of things that can differentiate one webpage from another and align it to what Google wants to rank.

He specifically said that Google’s algorithm detects if there is something different about it that makes it stand out. That was in 2012 but not much has changed because Google’s John Mueller says the same thing.

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For example, in 2020 John Mueller said that differentiation and being compelling is important for getting Google to notice and rank a webpage.

“So with that in mind, if you’re focused on kind of this small amount of content that is the same as everyone else then I would try to find ways to significantly differentiate yourselves to really make it clear that what you have on your website is significantly different than all of those other millions of ringtone websites that have kind of the same content.

…And that’s the same recommendation I would have for any kind of website that offers essentially the same thing as lots of other web sites do.

You really need to make sure that what you’re providing is unique and compelling and high quality so that our systems and users in general will say, I want to go to this particular website because they offer me something that is unique on the web and I don’t just want to go to any random other website.”

In 2021, in regard to getting Google to index a webpage, Mueller also said:

“Is it something the web has been waiting for? Or is it just another red widget?”

This thing about being compelling and different than other sites, it’s something that’s been a part of Google’s algorithm awhile, just like the Googler in the video said, just like Matt Cutts said and exactly like what Mueller has said as well.

Are they talking about signals?

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E-EA-T Algorithm Signals

We know there’s something in the algorithm that relates to someone’s expertise and background that Google’s looking for. The table is set and we can dig into the next step of what it all means.

A while back back I remember reading something that Marie Haynes said about E-A-T, she called it a framework. And I thought, now that’s an interesting thing she just did, she’s conceptualizing E-A-T.

When SEOs discussed E-A-T it was always in the context of what to do in order to demonstrate E-A-T. So they looked at the Quality Raters Guide for guidance, which kind of makes sense since it’s a guide, right?

But what I’m proposing is that the answer isn’t really in the guidelines or anything that the quality raters are looking for.

The best way to explain it is to ask you to think about the biggest part of Google’s algorithm, relevance.

What’s relevance? Is it something you have to do? It used to be about keywords and that’s easy for SEOs to understand. But it’s not about keywords anymore because Google’s algorithm has natural language understanding (NLU). NLU is what enables machines to understand language in the way that it’s actually spoken (natural language).

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So, relevance is just something that’s related or connected to something else. So, if I ask, how do I satiate my thirst? The answer can be water, because water quenches the thirst.

How is a site relevant to the search query: “how do I satiate my thirst?”

An SEO would answer the problem of relevance by saying that the webpage has to have the keywords that match the search query, which would be the words “satiate” and “thirst.”

The next step the SEO would take is to extract the related entities for “satiate” and “thirst” because every SEO “knows” they need to do entity research to understand how to make a webpage that answers the search query, “How do I satiate my thirst?”

Hypothetical Related entities:

  • Thirst: Water, dehydration, drink,
  • Satiate: Food, satisfaction, quench, fulfillment, appease

Now that the SEO has their entities and their keywords they put it all together and write a 600 word essay that uses all their keywords and entities so that their webpage is relevant for the search query, “How do I satiate my thirst?”

I think we can stop now and see how silly that is, right? If someone asked you, “How do I satiate my thirst?” You’d answer, “With water” or “a cold refreshing beer” because that’s what it means to be relevant.

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Relevance is just a concept. It doesn’t have anything to do with entities or keywords in today’s search algorithms because the machine is understanding search queries as natural language, even more so with AI search engines.

Similarly, E-E-A-T is also just a concept. It doesn’t have anything to do with author bios, LinkedIn profiles, it doesn’t have anything at all to do with making your content say that you handled the product that’s being reviewed.

Here’s what SearchLiaison recently said about an E-E-A-T, SEO and Ranking:

“….just making a claim and talking about a ‘rigorous testing process’ and following an ‘E-E-A-T checklist’ doesn’t guarantee a top ranking or somehow automatically cause a page to do better.”

Here’s the part where SearchLiaison ties a bow around the gift of E-E-A-T knowledge:

“We talk about E-E-A-T because it’s a concept that aligns with how we try to rank good content.”

E-E-A-T Can’t Be Itemized On A Checklist

Remember how we established that relevance is a concept and not a bunch of keywords and entities? Relevance is just answering the question.

E-E-A-T is the same thing. It’s not something that you do. It’s closer to something that you are.

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SearchLiaison elaborated:

“…our automated systems don’t look at a page and see a claim like “I tested this!” and think it’s better just because of that. Rather, the things we talk about with E-E-A-T are related to what people find useful in content. Doing things generally for people is what our automated systems seek to reward, using different signals.”

A Better Understanding Of E-E-A-T

I think it’s clear now how E-E-A-T isn’t something that’s added to a webpage or is something that is demonstrated on the webpage. It’s a concept, just like relevance.

A good way to think o fit is if someone asks you a question about your family and you answer it. Most people are pretty expert and experienced enough to answer that question. That’s what E-E-A-T is and how it should be treated when publishing content, regardless if it’s YMYL content or a product review, the expertise is just like answering a question about your family, it’s just a concept.

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Google Announces A New Carousel Rich Result

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Google Announces A New Carousel Rich Result

Google announced a new carousel rich result that can be used for local businesses, products, and events which will show a scrolling horizontal carousel displaying all of the items in the list. It’s very flexible and can even be used to create a top things to do in a city list that combines hotels, restaurants, and events. This new feature is in beta, which means it’s being tested.

The new carousel rich result is for displaying lists in a carousel format. According to the announcement the rich results is limited to the following types:

LocalBusiness and its subtypes, for example:
– Restaurant
– Hotel
– VacationRental
– Product
– Event

An example of subtypes is Lodgings, which is a subset of LocalBusiness.

Here is the Schema.org hierarchical structure that shows the LodgingBusiness type as being a subset of the LocalBusiness type.

  • Thing > Organization > LocalBusiness > LodgingBusiness
  • Thing > Place > LocalBusiness > LodgingBusiness

ItemList Structured Data

The carousel displays “tiles” that contain information from the webpage that’s about the price, ratings and images. The order of what’s in the ItemList structured data is the order that they will be displayed in the carousel.

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Publishers must use the ItemList structured data in order to become eligible for the new rich result

All information in the ItemList structured data must be on the webpage. Just like any other structured data, you can’t stuff the structured data with information that is not visible on the webpage itself.

There are two important rules when using this structured data:

  1. 1. The ItemList type must be the top level container for the structured data.
  2. 2. All the URLs of in the list must point to different webpages on the same domain.

The part about the ItemList being the top level container means that the structured data cannot be merged together with another structured data where the top-level container is something other than ItemList.

For example, the structured data must begin like this:

<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "ItemList", "itemListElement": [ { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 1,

A useful quality of this new carousel rich result is that publishers can mix and match the different entities as long as they’re within the eligible structured data types.

Eligible Structured Data Types

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  • LocalBusiness and its subtypes
  • Product
  • Event

Google’s announcement explains how to mix and match the different structured data types:

“You can mix and match different types of entities (for example, hotels, restaurants), if needed for your scenario. For example, if you have a page that has both local events and local businesses.”

Here is an example of a ListItem structured data that can be used in a webpage about Things To Do In Paris.

The following structured data is for two events and a local business (the Eiffel Tower):

<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "ItemList", "itemListElement": [ { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 1, "item": { "@type": "Event", "name": "Paris Seine River Dinner Cruise", "image": [ "https://example.com/photos/1x1/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/4x3/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/16x9/photo.jpg" ], "offers": { "@type": "Offer", "price": 45.00, "priceCurrency": "EUR" }, "aggregateRating": { "@type": "AggregateRating", "ratingValue": 4.2, "reviewCount": 690 }, "url": "https://www.example.com/event-location1" } }, { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 2, "item": { "@type": "LocalBusiness", "name": "Notre-Dame Cathedral", "image": [ "https://example.com/photos/1x1/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/4x3/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/16x9/photo.jpg" ], "priceRange": "$", "aggregateRating": { "@type": "AggregateRating", "ratingValue": 4.8, "reviewCount": 4220 }, "url": "https://www.example.com/localbusiness-location" } }, { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 3, "item": { "@type": "Event", "name": "Eiffel Tower With Host Summit Tour", "image": [ "https://example.com/photos/1x1/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/4x3/photo.jpg", "https://example.com/photos/16x9/photo.jpg" ], "offers": { "@type": "Offer", "price": 59.00, "priceCurrency": "EUR" }, "aggregateRating": { "@type": "AggregateRating", "ratingValue": 4.9, "reviewCount": 652 }, "url": "https://www.example.com/event-location2" } } ] } </script>

Be As Specific As Possible

Google’s guidelines recommends being as specific as possible but that if there isn’t a structured data type that closely matches with the type of business then it’s okay to use the more generic LocalBusiness structured data type.

“Depending on your scenario, you may choose the best type to use. For example, if you have a list of hotels and vacation rentals on your page, use both Hotel and VacationRental types. While it’s ideal to use the type that’s closest to your scenario, you can choose to use a more generic type (for example, LocalBusiness).”

Can Be Used For Products

A super interesting use case for this structured data is for displaying a list of products in a carousel rich result.

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The structured data for that begins as a ItemList structured data type like this:

<script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "ItemList", "itemListElement": [ { "@type": "ListItem", "position": 1, "item": { "@type": "Product",

The structured data can list images, ratings, reviewCount, and currency just like any other product listing, but doing it like this will make the webpage eligible for the carousel rich results.

Google has a list of recommended recommended properties that can be used with the Products version, such as offers, offers.highPrice, and offers.lowPrice.

Good For Local Businesses and Merchants

This new structured data is a good opportunity for local businesses and publishers that list events, restaurants and lodgings to get in on a new kind of rich result.

Using this structured data doesn’t guarantee that it will display as a rich result, it only makes it eligible for it.

This new feature is in beta, meaning that it’s a test.

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Read the new developer page for this new rich result type:

Structured data carousels (beta)

Featured Image by Shutterstock/RYO Alexandre

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