Connect with us

SEO

Bad Grammar or Broken HTML: Which Does Google Care about More?

Published

on

Bad Grammar or Broken HTML: Which Does Google Care about More?


Imagine this…

You’re checking out a site that has two flashing, neon-red issues that need fixing:

  • Multiple spelling errors and grammatical mistakes
  • Broken HTML causing some funky spacing issues

You know that both issues can spoil the reader’s experience. Broken HTML can mess up how a page renders — and grammatical boo-boos are just…bad.

But, are both issues equally “bad” in Google’s eyes? Or, is one of the issues a bigger SEO deal?

In the immortal words of BuzzFeed, the answer may surprise you.

Here’s what Google says about broken HTML.

Google’s John Mueller, during a recent hangout, made the distinction between HTML (a technical issue) and content (a quality issue.)

Broken HTML is a pain, yes, but according to Mueller, “for the most part, we don’t care if HTML is broken or not.”

Advertisement

Sure, if your HTML is so bad that Google can’t crawl it, you WILL have Google issues.

But if you have the occasionally broken code snippet and weirdly-rendering page? You’re probably OK.

Are grammar and spelling more important than HTML? Yes.

According to Mueller, “I would almost say …like… spelling and grammar is probably for most websites a higher priority than broken HTML.”

Why? Because bunches of spelling errors make a page read poorly. It’s a quality issue — and Google only wants to reward high-quality pages.

Mueller said, “we try to find really high-quality content on the web, and sometimes it can appear that a page is lower quality content because it has a lot of …kind of… grammatical and technical mistakes in the text.”

Here’s the write-up by Roger Montti for Search Engine Journal if you want to read the entire scoop.

Plus, think about typos and grammatical issues from your prospects’ experience. How much will someone trust your firm if they see mistake after mistake?

Especially if you’re trying to establish yourself as an expert?

Advertisement

What do other SEO writers think about this news?

The news seems to have put a smile on many writers’ faces.

I posted the Search Engine Journal article to my SEO Copywriting Certification training Facebook group. The feedback was fun.

Michelle Lowery, a digital content editor, posted the single word, “VINDICATION!”

Helen McCrone, a freelance translator, pointed out machine-translated content is often chock-full of huge grammatical mistakes. If you’re translating your content into multiple languages, working with a person is a smarter bet than running your copy through translation software. 

Deb Ferguson, the in-house writer for a law firm, commented, “Grammar and spelling issues make the company or writer seem less of an expert. They can ruin a company’s credibility in the industry and amongst its clients.”

That’s true. Can you imagine visiting a legal site with lots of typos? After all, if the legal firm can’t handle little details like site spelling and grammar — how can you feel good about them taking your case?

So yes, know that any broken HTML will eventually need a tune-up. But if it’s between rewriting pages with lots of spelling errors and fixing minor HTML issues, making the content better for your readers should win. 

Every time.

Advertisement

What do you think?

Does this latest bit of Google news surprise you? Leave a comment and let me know!

You can also keep up with the latest SEO writing news by signing up for my newsletter, or joining the SEO Writing Tips Facebook group. See you there!



Source link

SEO

Tips To Improve Your Relationship

Published

on

Tips To Improve Your Relationship

Historically, the tension between chief financial officers (CFOs) and marketing heads has often resulted from misalignment around long-term vs. short-term goals.

While CFOs are required to submit quarterly financial reports to shareholders, marketers are more often fixed on long-term objectives, such as brand value – which can be abstract.

Thankfully, the role of the CFO has evolved over the past few years, as most CFOs are no longer business hall monitors concerned with cost-cutting and oversight.

Rather, many CFOs now actively participate in organizational growth strategies designed to counteract losses in any economic environment.

Ideally, this shared goal should naturally align with many marketers’ objectives and create synergy down the road.

However, many organizations struggle to create proper symmetry between C-suite executives and keep data in silos.

What’s more, I’ve dealt with many CFOs in the past who simply didn’t understand the merits of SEO and how it differed from traditional marketing.

Advertisement

Unfortunately, for many agencies, this has caused their fair share of frustration when renewing clients and getting proper budget allocation for projects.

Therefore, educating CFOs and SEO pros about each other’s roles and processes is important to break the disconnect that prevents them from aligning around the same business goals and objectives.

The Importance Of CFO And SEO Alignment

According to a study by Deloitte, at least 73% of organizations that report C-suite alignment around marketing performance metrics received positive revenue growth in the past year.

The data shows that clear CFO and marketing alignment around goals, key performance indicators (KPIs), and language leads to greater business growth.

As CFOs begin to prioritize long-term growth over cost-cutting, this creates an opportunity for SEO pros to educate them about their goals and strategies and plead their cases for higher budget allocation.

With this in mind, we need to identify obstacles that inhibit this natural pairing and explore ways to overcome these pitfalls for better symmetry.

How To Improve The Relationship Between SEO And CFO

Create A Shared Language

As SEO pros, we understand that marketing offers better long-term stability to any organization over short-term, one-time sales.

However, qualitatively communicating brand value and loyalty to a CFO is like explaining how your favorite football team will win the Super Bowl next year.

Advertisement

Without real numbers or a shared understanding of marketing performance metrics and terminology, CFOs cannot comprehend the SEO team’s objectives.

Further, it can be impossible for SEO pros to translate these strategies into results without tangible financial metrics to present to CFOs.

Ultimately, it’s up to the SEO team to educate CFOs about their strategies and how this benefits their business financially.

Otherwise, CFOs might be reluctant to pour money into campaigns that are abstract in their view.

SEO professionals need to find ways to translate broad metrics from customer acquisition and lead generation into value-based business impact.

For example, assigning values to leads and forecasting their revenue allows CFOs to plan budgets. SEO pros can also assign value to intangible assets like brand equity to better convey their value in terms CFOs understand.

Another way SEO pros need to educate CFOs is around budget processes.

For example, marketing budgets are often used throughout multiple campaigns, which amortize over time. However, this is not often reflected in profit and loss statements from CFOs.

Advertisement

In this example, SEO pros must clearly outline these considerations to CFOs to avoid budget cuts because of unused or misallocated funds.

Nevertheless, if SEO pros and CFOs want to speak the same language, they must start tracking the same goals and KPIs.

Create Shared Goals

If you truly want to create alignment around shared goals and language, coordinate with your CFO by using the same metrics and KPIs to track performance data.

While marketers are free to get as granular as they wish, ultimately, it’s up to department heads to agree on a few key metrics.

For example, these key metrics can be translated directly into financial terms that create a shared language between SEOs and CFOs:

  • Return on investment (ROI): The overall profit generated from an SEO marketing campaign.
  • Customer lifetime value (CLV): The estimated net profit a customer will contribute throughout its relationship with a company. This roughly tells CFOs the values of a brand’s loyalty.
  • Conversion Rate: The number of people who visit a website and complete a sale. This number estimates the efficiency of a marketing campaign.

However, as CFOs look to extract more insights from data, adding quantitative value to KPIs will also greatly help both teams align on common goals – namely, long-term growth. These KPIs may include market penetration, lead acquisition, and brand exposure.

Connecting The Data

Unfortunately, one of the biggest stumbling blocks for CFOs and SEO pros is that financial officers often don’t view SEOs as the top money-makers in an organization.

Additionally, many CFOs simply don’t understand how SEO makes money or connects to their long-term goals.

Thankfully, analytics software has made it easier than ever to physically assign a quantitative value to campaigns that prove the marketing team’s value.

Advertisement

For example, by assigning sales to individual marketing campaigns at the top of sales funnels, marketers can show how they physically add value to a business.

Further, to assist with communicating ROI to CFOs, marketers can incorporate dotted line reporting that shares the financial performance of the SEO team directly to the financial team.

Look At Campaigns As A Financial Portfolio

Finally, our focus tends to skew toward changing how CFOs think – not how we act or distribute information.

Since financial experts tend to think in investment terms, why not present marketing campaigns like an investment portfolio?

With this approach, SEO pros can tie individual campaigns to investments in a portfolio and report any profits and losses from each investment directly in a statement to CFOs.

SEO pros would also be wise to illustrate how these investments contribute to long-term financial goals and feed their business.

Again, most of these considerations hinge upon resolving differences in perspectives.

By assigning financial value to individual campaigns and metrics, SEO pros can better align around shared business goals and growth strategies that increase their business.

Advertisement

And by proving the growth potential of the SEO team, they can acquire the necessary budget they need to perform their best and thus make the CFO look good.

More resources:


Featured Image: fizkes/Shutterstock

if( typeof sopp !== "undefined" && sopp === 'yes' ){ fbq('dataProcessingOptions', ['LDU'], 1, 1000); }else{ fbq('dataProcessingOptions', []); }

fbq('init', '1321385257908563');

fbq('track', 'PageView');

fbq('trackSingle', '1321385257908563', 'ViewContent', { content_name: 'seo-cfo-relationship', content_category: 'enterprise seo' }); } });



Source link

Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending

en_USEnglish