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Instagram Shares Tips on Effective Influencer Marketing

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Looking to tap into the power of influencer marketing to maximize your social media marketing efforts?

Influencer partnerships can have a huge impact on campaign success, especially on more creative, visual platforms, as understanding the ins and outs of each, and what will resonate with fans, is what these influencers work on, day-in and day-out.

The right collaboration could give your brand a major boost – and if you are looking to get started with influencer marketing, Instagram recently shared some tips to help.

Jules Lund is the founder of Tribe, an online marketplace for branded content, which aims to connect brands with the right influencers for their social efforts. Tribe has facilitated the creation of over one million pieces of branded content across 10,000 campaigns, and the company works with brands in the US, UK and Australia.

Based on these learnings, Lund offers three key tips for your influencer marketing approach.

1. Tap into Customer Creativity

Lund advises that brands should look to utilize UGC and influencer content through their campaigns to boost engagement and brand resonance. With so many people already posting content online, giving them a prompt to work with can be all it takes to get powerful, valuable branded material for your promotional efforts.

As per Lund:

“This content is authentic, from real people, and so it performs – because who better to create content that customers love, than customers themselves”

2. Find Happy Customers and Share Their Stories

Lund also advises that brands should celebrate their happy customers, by using their stories to better connect, and communicate about their business.

Lund says that brands should capture these stories, then pay to turn them into promotions.

“I’d pay to share that story. So, I’d turn their content into a social ad from a brand account, and then I’d turn their content into a branded content ad from the creator’s account, and then I’d compare the two. I’d be using small amounts to test and learn from different audiences, different formats, different objectives, and when I found winners, I’d cut the rest and supercharge those.”

Experimentation with brand messaging like this can help to determine the best way forward for your strategy, while again, using the experience of real people can help to boost your brand presence on social platforms.

3. Use Branded Content Ads

Lund’s final key tip is to utilize Facebook’s branded content ads to maximize that more personal, connective messaging.

Lund says that he thinks that “Facebook and Instagram’s branded content ad is potentially the most effective ad format we’ve seen”, because it combines the improved resonance of influencer posts with the platform’s ad targeting tools, giving you the authenticity of those more personal messages, with the focus of ads.

You can also add a CTA to these posts, making them more responsive, so you get the added credibility of the message coming from a person, as opposed to a brand handle, and the capacity to focus that messaging onto the most receptive audiences.

These are some good notes, and given the experiences of Tribe, Lund’s advice is backed by many promotions and experiences, adding credibility to his tips.

Worth considering in your approach.

Socialmediatoday.com

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Instagram adds “Text to Speech” and “Voice Effects” feature to assist content creators to …

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Instagram has brought two new features “Text to Speech” and “Voice Effects” to its platform. These features are already present on Tiktok. According to Instagram, users who create reels will be able to use these new features to make the reels better.

After Tiktok was banned in India, Instagram added a feature called Reels on its platform to attract content creators, although even after this, Reels has not been able to garner as much popularity as Tiktok, keeping this in mind Instagram is adding features like Tiktok to the reels so that more and more content creators will get attracted to the reels.

Text to speech feature will allow giving artificial voice to text. On the other hand, if we talk about Voice effects feature then with the help of the Voice Effects tool, you will be able to modify the audio and voice-over. Using these features will also be very easy, you will get a total of five-voice effect options, with the help of which you can convert ordinary audio into artificial voice including Announcer, Helium, Giant, Robot, and Singer. After recording a reel, tapping on a music note in the audio mixer will take you to the Effects menu, where you can add different sounds to your reel. Users can leverage these features on iOS and Android devices. Further in this article we will know how we can use these features to make a perfect reel.

Step 1: First of all go to the Instagram app and open the Reels section.

Step 2. After that open Instagram camera tocreate a reel or upload it from the mobile gallery.

Step 3: Now to write new text, you have to go to the Text tool.

Step 4: After typing the text, tap on Text to Speech at the bottom.

Step 5: In this option, you will see different options of voice, out of which you can select the voice of your choice.

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Instagram Launches ‘Add Yours’ Sticker to Facilitate More Engagement in Stories

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Oh look, Instagram is once again following the lead of TikTok with a new feature, what an astounding surprise this is.

Today, Instagram has launched a new ‘Add Yours’ sticker for Stories, which enables users to prompt others to respond to their Stories content, in order to create more engaging reply threads to Stories posts.

Instagram Add Yours sticker

As you can see here, now, users can add the new ‘Add Yours’ sticker to their Stories frame, with the example using an ‘outfit of the day’ prompt, calling for followers to respond with their own #OOTD image.

Instagram Add Yours sticker

When users respond, they’re added to the profile bubble listing on the sticker, which, when tapped, enables users to go through all the other responses to the thread, building a response chain within Stories that can help prompt more engagement.

Which sounds a lot like TikTok’s Duet feature, which often sees many users adding to a Duet chain, creating long, interactive streams of content based on the original theme.

The engaging, community-based creativity of TikTok is a key element in its appeal, so it’s no surprise to see Instagram, once again, taking inspiration from its now key rival. But at the same time, it’s a bit much – Facebook’s repetition sometimes feels like it’s going too far to try and latch onto these usage trends.

I mean, it makes sense – TikTok is seeing huge engagement, and Instagram wants to hook into that wherever it can, in order to keep users from migrating away from its app, and if it can utilize similar functions, it probably should at least test and see what results it gets. But it’s a fairly obvious replication here.

Maybe it works, so who really cares? But still, Instagram, and Facebook (or Meta) more broadly, is not very good at coming up with new, original ideas in this respect.

Which will be a key impediment to its new push to win back younger audiences, with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg recently noting that it will make serving young adults a priority in its products, rather than optimizing for older users. Facebook knows that it needs to maintain engagement with younger user groups to maximize take-up of its advanced, metaverse-aligned offerings, and the data shows that it’s losing on this front, with Facebook usage among people under the age of 24 declining over the past decade.

Facebook usage graph

A key issue in this sense is that Facebook simply lacks cultural nous, and understanding what younger audiences respond to – which is why Snapchat is regularly able to spark and lead new trends, and now TikTok has become the main vehicle for the same. Instagram did once have that cultural presence, that direct line with creative online communities, but over time – since Facebook took over – it’s also lost touch. And while the graph above doesn’t relate to Instagram usage, you can bet that the same trends are likely happening on IG as well, hence the renewed focus from Zuck on younger groups.

Which is relevant here because of the replication. Yes, Facebook has seen success in stealing features from Snapchat and TikTok, to varying degree, with Instagram Stories being the key winner, while Reels has also been a hit for Instagram, even if usage still trails well behind TikTok. But it’s not helping Facebook win the broader cultural shift, Facebook is no longer seen as the innovator, it’s lost its cool factor in this respect, because of the constant replication.

Or maybe not because of this, but it’s an element in the wider shift – Facebook’s become very good at bringing these features to less web-savvy users who aren’t active in these other, newer apps.

But for those that are always across the next key trends – like, say, younger audiences – Facebook’s replication just seems stale and second rate. It’s the older people catching up on things behind everyone else, then telling you about this cool new feature that you’d already been using well before they came across it.

That’s the inherent failure in Facebook’s replication approach, that it constantly leaves it a step behind, rather than being a leader – and if it’s not a leader, it loses that cool cred, and younger audience engagement as a result.

So it might work, in a broader sense, in terms of deriving in-app engagement on the back of these usage trends originating from other apps. But really, it’s like the corporatization of these shifts, and unless Facebook can change things up, and start leading the way on some of these key trends, I don’t see how it’s going to win back the youth.

Instagram had been testing the ‘Add Yours’ sticker with some users over the past month, but it’s now being rolled out to all users globally, on iOS and Android.

Socialmediatoday.com

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Instagram For E-Commerce

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Alright, let’s get this out the way. Millennials and Gen-Z have ruined everything. Now that that’s out of the way, we can get on to how they’ve changed the way e-commerce brands handle sales, marketing, customer engagement, and advertising.

We’ve seen and read enough articles online about how Millennials have ruined this industry, or that industry.

In all fairness, the way they’ve changed the e-commerce industry has had a quite positive impact for businesses and vice versa. Millennials and Gen-Z make up a majority of Instagram users, growing in their careers to have better purchasing power. In fact, a study (.pdf) has revealed that 81 percent of millennials are shopping online on a weekly basis. 

What does that mean?

Essentially, with such a large number of shoppers online, it changes the way you’d handle e-commerce and retail. The pandemic and the waves of lockdowns have exploded the use and growth of online shopping.

If the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s how digital spaces have added value to businesses, helped companies stay afloat during these times, and how physical spaces aren’t always a 100 percent necessary to run your business. But rejoice! Because this does have quite a few positive implications for businesses. 

All you need to look at is the recent trends in advertising and marketing on Instagram. The endless scrolling that Instagram users go through pretty much everyday exposes users to hundreds of ads, and the lines between posts and ads become quite blurred.


Sure, Amazon does have a firm grip in the e-commerce space, but while Amazon functions on a planned shopping model (where users pretty much know what exactly they’re looking for, and search for those products), Instagram relies more on impulse buying.
So while Amazon is established in the market, it lacks Instagram’s appeal of seamless advertising with the ease of online purchase. 

Why Go Digital?

The pros of online shopping really do outweigh the cons. Yes, quite a few shoppers do love the experience of physically going to stores, actually seeing and trying out the products they’re buying, and speaking to a sales person to get more details of the product they’re buying.

However, with the rate at which e-commerce is scaling, businesses (and these platforms) are finding better ways of offering better online shopping experiences to customers. The most obvious pro is accessibility. Customers are no longer limited to shopping in stores specific to their city.

You no longer have to go through the disappointment of finding some great products and realising there are no stores in your city. In fact, it’s also become the case that you might find some great international brands as well, really love their products, and realise, “Yes! I can get this shipped to my place!”

According to ToughNickel, the biggest advantage is convenience. But besides the convenience, you have the bonus of not facing any undue sales pressure, wider variety, as well as easy comparison of prices to find the best deal for yourself.

While Instagram may not solve the problem of physical spaces and physically trying out products, it does solve the problem of making your business accessible online, and giving them another channel to shop.

Plus, with Instagram’s APIs now open, giving you the ability to build out chatbots and integrate with other apps, it solves the problem of communication, with chatbots being able to answer FAQs, give customers purchase options, instant information about their orders, and provide a seamless transition between chatbots and human interaction.

As mentioned earlier, the number of users on Instagram along with the impulse to buy stuff they come across randomly while scrolling makes Instagram one of the best spaces to be present in, especially considering the shift in shopping habits by the younger generation, regardless of whether you’re a new business or not.

Author:
Anish, Developer, Tellephant

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