Connect with us
Cloak And Track Your Affiliate Links With Our User-Friendly Link Cloaking Tool, Try It Free

MARKETING

Are NFTs Something Content Marketers Should Care About?

Published

on

Are NFTs Something Content Marketers Should Care About?

What’s your take on NFTs?

1. Yes, please.

2. Wait and see.

3. Pfft.

Brands like Gap, Coca-Cola, Adidas, Reebok, Lamborghini, and other consumer product companies would respond, “Yes, please,” as they have made splashy forays. News, sports, and entertainment brands have made moves, too.

If you haven’t gotten questions about how (or whether) your brand’s content strategy should include NFTs, it’s only a matter of time.

Before you answer the inevitable question, you should understand some NFT basics and know how they can be used.

Content strategist and comic book author Buddy Scalera offered a helpful introduction for content marketers in a recent episode of The Creative Show, which he hosts with CMI Creative Director Joseph (JK) Kalinowski.

Like many creatives, Buddy’s interest in the topic sprang from the news in 2021 that an NFT minted by Beeple sold for more than $69 million. Buddy researched, experimented, and eventually co-wrote a comic explaining how NFTs work.

I’ve recapped his answers to several NFT questions on content marketers’ minds (and supplemented some of his answers with additional information and resources). You can watch the full discussion:

What is an NFT?

NFT stands for non-fungible token. That clears everything up, doesn’t it? (No? Not for me, either.)

Wikipedia explains an NFT as “a non-interchangeable unit of data stored on a blockchain, a form of digital ledger, that can be sold and traded. Types of NFT data units may be associated with digital files such as photos, videos, and audio.”

Buddy helpfully likens an NFT to the deed to a house. Just as a deed proves you own the house, an NFT proves you own a digital asset.

@BuddyScalera likens an #NFT to a deed to a house. It proves you own a digital asset via @KMoutsos @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

Here’s where things get a little murky, though.

Owning an NFT doesn’t mean you own the copyright to the digital asset it’s associated with. It indicates you own the original digital asset. As NerdWallet explains, an NFT “essentially allows its buyer to say that they own the original copy of a digital file in the same way you might own the original copy of a piece of physical art or the master file of a music recording.”

Owning an #NFT doesn’t mean you own the copyright to the digital asset, says @KMoutsos via @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

The answers to what ownership rights come with an NFT purchase is evolving. Anyone considering creating, buying, or selling NFTs should study this closely (and, ideally, get good legal advice).

Can brands use NFTs for more than digital art?

NFTs for digital art, collectibles, and metaverse real estate or accessories, get plenty of public attention. But, a recent Harvard Business Review article suggests that brands focusing on using NFT collections to represent their physical products in the digital work (think NFTs for digital Nike sneakers) may miss the bigger opportunity.

Eventually, the article suggests, “​​NFTs could be the central digital touchpoint between brands and their consumers — and one that is controlled by the brand itself.” Instead of using NFTs for digital assets, brands could use them to identify unique experiences or objects in the physical world.

#NFTs could be the central digital touchpoint between brands and their consumers – one controlled by the brand, says @HarvardBiz via @KMoutsos @CMIContent. Click To Tweet

So-called “utility NFTs,” as Buddy explains, are NFTs that unlock something. Buddy points to Gary Vaynerchuk’s VeeFriends NFT project. Buying a VeeFriends NFT unlocks different functionality (e.g., a one-on-one coaching session with Gary, access to an exclusive part of his Discord community). In this case, buying the NFT is akin to purchasing a pass or ticket for some extra value.

In a brand scenario, the company would decide what that pass in the form of an NFT would unlock. It could be for something your business would ordinarily charge, like an extended warranty or an event experience. “You get this whole experiential marketing thing,” Buddy says.

One of the most visible NFT projects, Bored Ape Yacht Club, offers both a creative asset and utility in each token. Owners of Bored Ape NFTs can access a social club with benefits like a private Discord server where members can chat with other members.

Earlier this year, a free NFT collection for the Grammy Awards offered access to a private Discord channel. And one of the NFTs unlocked a “golden ticket,” which paid travel and lodging costs for the winner and a friend to go to the awards ceremony.

Should my brand’s content strategy include NFTs?

While you are the best person to know if your brand’s content strategy should include NFTs, Buddy suggests using the 3 Cs of content marketing to make your decision – content, community, and consistency.

Again, Buddy points to Gary Vaynerchuck, who has nurtured his community with consistent free content for a decade. When he dropped an NFT collection, his community was ready for it.

But brands will struggle with NFTs if they don’t pay attention to the fundamentals, JK cautions. That means educating the audience about the value your NFT project has to them and not just jumping on the bandwagon because other brands are doing it.

“We as brand stewards or consultants need to be honest and transparent with our brands,” Buddy explains. That means doing the hard work that goes into evaluating any content marketing initiative. Most of that work happens before you even start thinking about what kind of content (NFT or not) to create.

Buddy suggests asking these questions before delving into NFTs:

  • How will an NFT project align with our business strategy?
  • How will it align with our brand goals?
  • Does it make sense for your customers or audience?

I’d add one more question: Does it align with what your brand stands for?

Patagonia probably won’t offer NFTs (or find success with them if they do) because of their commitment to environmental causes. The environmental impact of minting (i.e., creating) a typical NFT (and other blockchain assets) equals 500 miles of driving in a gasoline-powered car.

Salesforce learned the hard way about NFT alignment with brand values. A sustainably committed company, Salesforce found hundreds of its employees protesting its plans to create an “NFT cloud” where creators could mint and sell the tokens. The employees thought the environmental impact of NFTs conflicted with the company’s commitment to sustainability, which it had recently touted in an ad that ran during the Super Bowl.

What should I do about NFTs today?

What you should do today about NFTs really depends on your analysis of how (or whether) NFTs make sense for your audience and your brand. It’s the same advice you’ve heard about entering any trendy new initiatives.

If your audience consists of gamers, art collectors or enthusiasts, and people receptive to interacting with blockchain-related elements or hanging out in the metaverse, you might decide to move faster than someone whose audience feels less connected to those circles.

Use these early days to talk with stakeholders about how NFTs might fit with your brand strategy, positioning, and values. Talk with your audience and customers to gauge their level of interest in and openness to NFTs. If NFTs seem promising after those discussions, study up to decide your best way forward.

Bookmark these resources to help you on your way:

I’d love to hear what you think about NFTs. Are they a fit for your audience? Do you want to read more about brands using NFTs? What other NFT questions can we help you answer? Let me know in the comments.

Want to learn how to balance, manage, and scale great content experiences across all your essential platforms and channels? Join us at ContentTECH Summit (May 31-June 2) in San Diego. Browse the schedule or register today. Use the code BLOG100 to save $100.

Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute



Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

MARKETING

YouTube Ad Specs, Sizes, and Examples [2024 Update]

Published

on

YouTube Ad Specs, Sizes, and Examples

Introduction

With billions of users each month, YouTube is the world’s second largest search engine and top website for video content. This makes it a great place for advertising. To succeed, advertisers need to follow the correct YouTube ad specifications. These rules help your ad reach more viewers, increasing the chance of gaining new customers and boosting brand awareness.

Types of YouTube Ads

Video Ads

  • Description: These play before, during, or after a YouTube video on computers or mobile devices.
  • Types:
    • In-stream ads: Can be skippable or non-skippable.
    • Bumper ads: Non-skippable, short ads that play before, during, or after a video.

Display Ads

  • Description: These appear in different spots on YouTube and usually use text or static images.
  • Note: YouTube does not support display image ads directly on its app, but these can be targeted to YouTube.com through Google Display Network (GDN).

Companion Banners

  • Description: Appears to the right of the YouTube player on desktop.
  • Requirement: Must be purchased alongside In-stream ads, Bumper ads, or In-feed ads.

In-feed Ads

  • Description: Resemble videos with images, headlines, and text. They link to a public or unlisted YouTube video.

Outstream Ads

  • Description: Mobile-only video ads that play outside of YouTube, on websites and apps within the Google video partner network.

Masthead Ads

  • Description: Premium, high-visibility banner ads displayed at the top of the YouTube homepage for both desktop and mobile users.

YouTube Ad Specs by Type

Skippable In-stream Video Ads

  • Placement: Before, during, or after a YouTube video.
  • Resolution:
    • Horizontal: 1920 x 1080px
    • Vertical: 1080 x 1920px
    • Square: 1080 x 1080px
  • Aspect Ratio:
    • Horizontal: 16:9
    • Vertical: 9:16
    • Square: 1:1
  • Length:
    • Awareness: 15-20 seconds
    • Consideration: 2-3 minutes
    • Action: 15-20 seconds

Non-skippable In-stream Video Ads

  • Description: Must be watched completely before the main video.
  • Length: 15 seconds (or 20 seconds in certain markets).
  • Resolution:
    • Horizontal: 1920 x 1080px
    • Vertical: 1080 x 1920px
    • Square: 1080 x 1080px
  • Aspect Ratio:
    • Horizontal: 16:9
    • Vertical: 9:16
    • Square: 1:1

Bumper Ads

  • Length: Maximum 6 seconds.
  • File Format: MP4, Quicktime, AVI, ASF, Windows Media, or MPEG.
  • Resolution:
    • Horizontal: 640 x 360px
    • Vertical: 480 x 360px

In-feed Ads

  • Description: Show alongside YouTube content, like search results or the Home feed.
  • Resolution:
    • Horizontal: 1920 x 1080px
    • Vertical: 1080 x 1920px
    • Square: 1080 x 1080px
  • Aspect Ratio:
    • Horizontal: 16:9
    • Square: 1:1
  • Length:
    • Awareness: 15-20 seconds
    • Consideration: 2-3 minutes
  • Headline/Description:
    • Headline: Up to 2 lines, 40 characters per line
    • Description: Up to 2 lines, 35 characters per line

Display Ads

  • Description: Static images or animated media that appear on YouTube next to video suggestions, in search results, or on the homepage.
  • Image Size: 300×60 pixels.
  • File Type: GIF, JPG, PNG.
  • File Size: Max 150KB.
  • Max Animation Length: 30 seconds.

Outstream Ads

  • Description: Mobile-only video ads that appear on websites and apps within the Google video partner network, not on YouTube itself.
  • Logo Specs:
    • Square: 1:1 (200 x 200px).
    • File Type: JPG, GIF, PNG.
    • Max Size: 200KB.

Masthead Ads

  • Description: High-visibility ads at the top of the YouTube homepage.
  • Resolution: 1920 x 1080 or higher.
  • File Type: JPG or PNG (without transparency).

Conclusion

YouTube offers a variety of ad formats to reach audiences effectively in 2024. Whether you want to build brand awareness, drive conversions, or target specific demographics, YouTube provides a dynamic platform for your advertising needs. Always follow Google’s advertising policies and the technical ad specs to ensure your ads perform their best. Ready to start using YouTube ads? Contact us today to get started!

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

MARKETING

Why We Are Always ‘Clicking to Buy’, According to Psychologists

Published

on

Why We Are Always 'Clicking to Buy', According to Psychologists

Amazon pillows.

(more…)

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

MARKETING

A deeper dive into data, personalization and Copilots

Published

on

A deeper dive into data, personalization and Copilots

Salesforce launched a collection of new, generative AI-related products at Connections in Chicago this week. They included new Einstein Copilots for marketers and merchants and Einstein Personalization.

To better understand, not only the potential impact of the new products, but the evolving Salesforce architecture, we sat down with Bobby Jania, CMO, Marketing Cloud.

Dig deeper: Salesforce piles on the Einstein Copilots

Salesforce’s evolving architecture

It’s hard to deny that Salesforce likes coming up with new names for platforms and products (what happened to Customer 360?) and this can sometimes make the observer wonder if something is brand new, or old but with a brand new name. In particular, what exactly is Einstein 1 and how is it related to Salesforce Data Cloud?

“Data Cloud is built on the Einstein 1 platform,” Jania explained. “The Einstein 1 platform is our entire Salesforce platform and that includes products like Sales Cloud, Service Cloud — that it includes the original idea of Salesforce not just being in the cloud, but being multi-tenancy.”

Data Cloud — not an acquisition, of course — was built natively on that platform. It was the first product built on Hyperforce, Salesforce’s new cloud infrastructure architecture. “Since Data Cloud was on what we now call the Einstein 1 platform from Day One, it has always natively connected to, and been able to read anything in Sales Cloud, Service Cloud [and so on]. On top of that, we can now bring in, not only structured but unstructured data.”

That’s a significant progression from the position, several years ago, when Salesforce had stitched together a platform around various acquisitions (ExactTarget, for example) that didn’t necessarily talk to each other.

“At times, what we would do is have a kind of behind-the-scenes flow where data from one product could be moved into another product,” said Jania, “but in many of those cases the data would then be in both, whereas now the data is in Data Cloud. Tableau will run natively off Data Cloud; Commerce Cloud, Service Cloud, Marketing Cloud — they’re all going to the same operational customer profile.” They’re not copying the data from Data Cloud, Jania confirmed.

Another thing to know is tit’s possible for Salesforce customers to import their own datasets into Data Cloud. “We wanted to create a federated data model,” said Jania. “If you’re using Snowflake, for example, we more or less virtually sit on your data lake. The value we add is that we will look at all your data and help you form these operational customer profiles.”

Let’s learn more about Einstein Copilot

“Copilot means that I have an assistant with me in the tool where I need to be working that contextually knows what I am trying to do and helps me at every step of the process,” Jania said.

For marketers, this might begin with a campaign brief developed with Copilot’s assistance, the identification of an audience based on the brief, and then the development of email or other content. “What’s really cool is the idea of Einstein Studio where our customers will create actions [for Copilot] that we hadn’t even thought about.”

Here’s a key insight (back to nomenclature). We reported on Copilot for markets, Copilot for merchants, Copilot for shoppers. It turns out, however, that there is just one Copilot, Einstein Copilot, and these are use cases. “There’s just one Copilot, we just add these for a little clarity; we’re going to talk about marketing use cases, about shoppers’ use cases. These are actions for the marketing use cases we built out of the box; you can build your own.”

It’s surely going to take a little time for marketers to learn to work easily with Copilot. “There’s always time for adoption,” Jania agreed. “What is directly connected with this is, this is my ninth Connections and this one has the most hands-on training that I’ve seen since 2014 — and a lot of that is getting people using Data Cloud, using these tools rather than just being given a demo.”

What’s new about Einstein Personalization

Salesforce Einstein has been around since 2016 and many of the use cases seem to have involved personalization in various forms. What’s new?

“Einstein Personalization is a real-time decision engine and it’s going to choose next-best-action, next-best-offer. What is new is that it’s a service now that runs natively on top of Data Cloud.” A lot of real-time decision engines need their own set of data that might actually be a subset of data. “Einstein Personalization is going to look holistically at a customer and recommend a next-best-action that could be natively surfaced in Service Cloud, Sales Cloud or Marketing Cloud.”

Finally, trust

One feature of the presentations at Connections was the reassurance that, although public LLMs like ChatGPT could be selected for application to customer data, none of that data would be retained by the LLMs. Is this just a matter of written agreements? No, not just that, said Jania.

“In the Einstein Trust Layer, all of the data, when it connects to an LLM, runs through our gateway. If there was a prompt that had personally identifiable information — a credit card number, an email address — at a mimum, all that is stripped out. The LLMs do not store the output; we store the output for auditing back in Salesforce. Any output that comes back through our gateway is logged in our system; it runs through a toxicity model; and only at the end do we put PII data back into the answer. There are real pieces beyond a handshake that this data is safe.”

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

Trending