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B2B is adopting D2C habits

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B2B is adopting D2C habits


MarTech’s daily brief features daily insights, news, tips, and essential bits of wisdom for today’s digital marketer. If you would like to read this before the rest of the internet does, sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox daily.

Good morning, Marketers, and the digital economy is getting more personal.

This isn’t only the call from Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen at Adobe Summit, but also the motivation behind the evolving app marketplace landscape, through new discovery features and integrations at Salesforce and HubSpot.

The B2B business customer has adopted many of the buying habits of D2C e-commerce consumers, especially with fewer live conferences and in-person meetings in the last two years. More important than just habits, the B2B customer’s needs have changed. They need quicker service to implement rapid transformation.

Since this journey is more digital, there’s more data, and an expectation, to make it more personalized. To keep up with other B2B and B2C trends, there’s no better way than to immerse yourself in over 45 sessions at our MarTech virtual conference March 29 and 30 (registration is free). We’ve made it easy for attendees to select relevant talks ahead of time so their schedule is personalized and ready to go on these two big days.

Chris Wood,

Editor

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What we’re reading: On the subject of privacy, marketers experienced a rewind last week when HBO was slapped with a class action lawsuit alleging that it was sharing the viewing histories of its HBO Max subscribers with Facebook. The alleged violation wasn’t with CCPA or other newer state laws, but instead with the federal Video Privacy Protection Act (VPPA), which has been on the books since 1988 and was intended to protect the rental histories of video store customers. The law was passed after a journalist obtained the rental history of Robert Bork. Interesting that, these days, all our digital trails are subject to the same scrutiny as a supreme court nominee, although the processes are largely automated and the goal is to sell you more things, not discredit you from joining the highest court in the land.

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About The Author

Chris Wood draws on over 15 years of reporting experience as a B2B editor and journalist. At DMN, he served as associate editor, offering original analysis on the evolving marketing tech landscape. He has interviewed leaders in tech and policy, from Canva CEO Melanie Perkins, to former Cisco CEO John Chambers, and Vivek Kundra, appointed by Barack Obama as the country’s first federal CIO. He is especially interested in how new technologies, including voice and blockchain, are disrupting the marketing world as we know it. In 2019, he moderated a panel on “innovation theater” at Fintech Inn, in Vilnius. In addition to his marketing-focused reporting in industry trades like Robotics Trends, Modern Brewery Age and AdNation News, Wood has also written for KIRKUS, and contributes fiction, criticism and poetry to several leading book blogs. He studied English at Fairfield University, and was born in Springfield, Massachusetts. He lives in New York.



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MARKETING

Google, NBCUniversal duking it out to be Netflix adtech provider

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Netflix is playing catch-up in the AVOD game

Ads are coming to Netflix, and Google and NBCUniversal are fighting for the lucrative right to provide them.

Why it’s happening. Until recently Netflix’s position as the dominant streaming service allowed it grow revenue without advertising. A subscription price increase earlier this year led to a loss of about 200,000 subscribers. The first loss in more than a decade. Despite this, Netflix says its user base continues to grow. One explanation: Password sharing. That would explain why there are fewer subscribers but more viewers


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The company is now also facing serious challenges from other streaming providers. So, even though its revenue continues to grow, it is looking to bolster them with a lower-priced, ad-supported subscription option. Bringing in Google or NBCUniversal, could make this happen much faster, though it could still be a year or more before it becomes a reality. 

The case for NBCUniversal. It’s likely that a partnership with NBCUniversal would be exclusive. Their ad unit, FreeWheel, would provide the necessary technology to deliver the ads. The NBCUniversal sales team would help to sell the ads across Europe and the US. 

The case for Google. Google brings its own ad platform, which Netflix is currently a customer of. An agreement with Google could mean an exclusive arrangement, but it hasn’t been confirmed. 

Both competitors are currently working with other large brands. A potential deal with Netflix could mean sharing access to its tech partners and audiences. NBCUniversal is the exclusive reseller of ads for Apple News and Apple Stocks since 2017 and has recently expanded into the UK. Google had been providing ad service to the Walt Disney Co. (a previous FreeWheel customer and current Netflix competitor) since 2018.

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What Netflix is saying. Netflix hasn’t provided any details of its plans, how many ads will run, ad targeting, or reach. 

Read the announcement. You can read the article from the Wall Street Journal here.

Why we care. From outside, Netflix’s subscription price increase, the fourth since 2018, seems an odd choice. It was announced at the end of January when inflation was already a growing concern for consumers. Also, viewers were already complaining about decreasing quality in new content while old favorites were no longer available. People are cutting spending and may turn to one of the emerging high-quality, lower-cost competitors.

Those competitors are also either ad-free or offer an ad-free version at a low cost. So an ad-supported Netflix tier may not be all that appealing. It’s rash to second guess a company as successful as Netflix, but this doesn’t seem to be a well-thought-out plan.

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Read next: Why we care about adtech: The complete guide


About The Author

Nicole Farley is an editor for Search Engine Land covering all things PPC. In addition to being a Marine Corps veteran, she has an extensive background in digital marketing, an MBA and a penchant for true crime, podcasts, travel, and snacks.

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