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Sitecore integrates CDP, marketing automation features from acquired platforms

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Steve Tzikakis, Sitecore CEO


Steve Tzikakis, Sitecore CEO
Steve Tzikakis, CEO, Sitecore.

Following a headline-grabbing $1.2 billion funding round in January 2021, digital experience platform Sitecore went on an acquisition spree, picking up CDP Boxever, headless e-commerce solution Four51, marketing automation platform Moosend and predictive digital search solution Reflektion. Sitecore has now confirmed the full integration of the core products from those acquisitions.


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Specific updates. In addition, Sitecore announced a number of specific updates built on these integrations:

  • Utilizing Four51 capabilities, Sitecore announced new order routing and pricing flexibility within Sitecore OrderCloud and a new Inventory Records feature to support inventory management.
  • Sitecore Send, the personalized email solution, has an improved user experience and functions in six additional languages, based on Moosend capabilities.
  • Building on Reflektion, Sitecore Discover has enhanced the appearance of its Commerce Engagement Console with an improved user experience and more control over merchandising.
  • Sitecore Personalize, integrated with Sitecore Experience Manager, offers real-time personalization based on Boxever’s decisioning.

Sitecore is also offering new connectors in the Sitecore Marketplace including Salesforce Marketing Cloud, Responsys, and Klaviyo.

Read next: What is a digital experience platform?

Why we care. E-commerce is on fire and has been for two years now. Along with that have come big investments in the leading DXPs, followed by multiple acquisitions. What were once essentially e-commerce plus CMS offerings are looking more and more like end-to-end marketing suites, and there are significant opportunities in this space as all kinds of verticals accept the reality of digital commerce.

Steve Tzikakis, CEO of Sitecore, listed some of them for us: “Manufacturing, heavy assets, retail, healthcare—which is at the epicenter of everything that’s happening—banking.” He described it as “a tectonic shift in the market.”


About The Author

Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space. He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020. Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.



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MARKETING

Only 38% of marketers very confident in their customer data and analytics systems

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Only 38% of marketers very confident in their customer data and analytics systems

Only 38% of marketers globally are very confident in their data, analytics and insight systems, according to a new report from The CMO Council. And, while 91% say direct access to customer data is a critical competitive advantage, only 11% say that data is readily accessible to them. 

Read next: Only 11% of CMOs say they have achieved digital transformation goals

North American marketers. Most of these numbers are global ones, but the ones specifically from North American marketers are not good. Only 28% say they are very confident in their data systems to win and retain customers. Compare that with Europe where 61% answered yes to this. Just 6% of North American respondents said they have high access to customer data vs. 20% of Europeans. On the issue of being able to move quickly from data to action, it is 8% from our side of the Atlantic versus 36% from theirs. And Europeans have a lot more faith in their systems: 46% say they’re confident the martech they have can adapt to future needs versus 20% in the U.S. and Canada.

Source: CMO Council’s High Velocity Data Report.
Used with permission.

Barriers to data access. Nearly three-quarters (73%) said not having the right tools prevents them from getting the data they need. The lack of proper data management processes was cited by 60% of respondents. Next up, both with 41%: Data control being elsewhere in the organization and the data not being available in real time.

Can’t get the most from their data. The biggest things preventing marketers from maximizing the data they already have? Some 55% said a lack of systems connecting data silos and making it easy to access. The talent shortage is No. 2 on the list, cited by 52% of respondents. Next on the list at 44% was not having the money to improve data systems.

Why we care. Good data is gold, bad data isn’t just useless – it can lead to very big mistakes in planning, allocation and all the other parts of marketing. So why can’t marketing departments get the data they need? This study implies it’s because they are failing to convince their own organizations about what they need. This is understandable. Convincing a customer is comparatively easy: They aren’t competing with you for resources and to move up the career ladder. So maybe it’s time to put together a campaign around the needs of the marketing department.


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About The Author

Constantine von Hoffman is managing editor of MarTech. A veteran journalist, Con has covered business, finance, marketing and tech for CBSNews.com, Brandweek, CMO, and Inc. He has been city editor of the Boston Herald, news producer at NPR, and has written for Harvard Business Review, Boston Magazine, Sierra, and many other publications. He has also been a professional stand-up comedian, given talks at anime and gaming conventions on everything from My Neighbor Totoro to the history of dice and boardgames, and is author of the magical realist novel John Henry the Revelator. He lives in Boston with his wife, Jennifer, and either too many or too few dogs.

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