Connect with us

SEO

25 Best About Us Page Examples On The Web

Published

on

25 Best About Us Page Examples On The Web

The About Us page of your website is an essential source of information for all who want to know more about your business.

About Us pages are where you showcase your history, what is unique about your work, your company’s values, and who you serve.

The design, written content, and visual or video elements together tell an important story about who you are and why you do it.

How can you make the most of this integral part of your marketing strategy?

In this article, you’ll learn what makes an exceptional About Us page.

You’ll find 25 examples of the best ones out there, too, to inspire your own About Us page design and content.

The Components Of A Great About Us Page

There isn’t a winning template to create a great About Us page. However, there are key components to make a convincing pitch with your brand story.

Your Mission

You don’t need to outright say, “our mission is ____,” but you should convey the mission of your business in your About Us copy. This is key for attracting talent, as well as leads that have Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) goals.

Your Story (History)

Every business has an origin story worth telling, and usually, one that justifies why you even do business and have clients.

Some centennial enterprises have pages of content that can fit in this section, while startups can tell the story of how the company was born, its challenges, and its vision for the future.

Your Services (And Benefits)

Of course, you have a homepage and dedicated pages for your products, but summarizing your offerings on the About Us page is crucial to tie them in with brand values in your messaging.

Highlight the benefits and showcase what you do (and why it is unique).

Your Social Proof

Reviews, client logos, case studies, and results bring consistency to your About Us page. It’s what really proves what you are saying is real and the impact you can bring to future clients.

With these components in mind, you will have a framework from which to build an engaging and unique About Us page.

However, if you are looking for some inspiration, the 25 examples below will guide your creative process.

Screenshot from ToyFight, January 2022

ToyFight is an award-winning creative design agency.

You’ll find the About Page at the top of the menu under the Who section.

This page has a unique feel, thanks to the deconstructed action figures representing the founders, Leigh Whipday and Jonny Lander.

The great attention to detail and interactivity also reflect the company’s 16 years of experience.

To sum up, this page stands out by providing the perfect mix of fun and information.

Band About Us PageScreenshot from Band, January 2022

Band is a multidisciplinary creative studio based in the Pacific Northwest.

Their About Us page stands out by showcasing some of their unique and creative projects.

No number of words could hope to tell one of their potential clients nearly as much as these pictures can.

In this case, the 25 pictures featured on Band’s About Us page are worth much more than the 170 actual words you’ll read on the page.

The magical visuals and overall simple look and feel make this About Us page one of our top picks.

Anton & Irene About Us pageScreenshot from Anton & Irene, January 2022

This might be the most distinctive website we’ve come across.

Anton & Irene is a design agency based in Manhattan.

Why are they a distinctive web presence?

Because their page takes parallax scrolling to the next level.

The snowy effects, bold colors, and quirky visuals create a truly captivating experience.

Pierro Caron About Us pageScreenshot from Pierro Caron, January 2022

Pierro Caron is a French artisan sculptor.

Want to know our favorite part about his page?

The honesty.

Here is a man with great respect for wood and handcrafted sculptures that “tell a story and testify to the richness of one of our most precious resources.”

His website is light, easy to read, and filled with inspiring quotes and photos of his labors of love.

Blake Fili Suárez About Us pageScreenshot from Blake Fili Suárez, January 2022

Who doesn’t love a good bio?

Especially one that starts with “I was born in good ol’ Madison, Wisconsin. The son of a Librarian and a Researcher.”

It also goes on to tell you how he and his family survived Hurricane Andrew and how his sister was born that night.

Who is this guy?

Blake Fili Suárez is an illustrator and designer with a fantastic sense of humor.

His quirkiness comes through thanks to his humorous tone and goofy picture.

The page, while minimalist in design, offers a glimpse into Suárez’s colorful personality and his impressive block of work.

LessFilms About Us pageScreenshot from LessFIlms, January 2022

If you were a “super awesome” video business, what medium would you choose to show people what you do?

Video, of course.

LessFilms is a video production company based in Florida with clients and team members all over the world.

On their about page, you’ll find a humorous 50-second video along with a short list of facts summarizing their love for tacos, travel, and karate – a theme that certainly permeates most of the content on the website.

Doomtree About Us pageScreenshot from DoomTree, January 2022

DoomTree’s page starts off as a coming-of-age story about how “a mess of friends” built the record label that made them a household name in Minneapolis.

However, it’s really the audio and the visuals that got us hooked.

Why tell, when you can show, right?

Explore their About Us page to meet the crew, listen to their songs, and get the latest news.

Cupcakes and Cashmere About Us pageScreenshot from Cupcakes and Cashmere, January 2022

On this website’s main page you will find everything lifestyle-related – fashion, food, beauty, home decor, and more.

But it’s the About section that introduces you to the team that makes this website an endless source of inspiration.

The page introduces founder Emily Schuman, as well as her blog, books, and fashion collection.

Want to stay in touch?

No problem – the page also features useful links to her social media pages, as well as her online shop.

NOWNESS About Us pageScreenshot from NOWNESS, January 2022

NOWNESS is a video channel providing the best in global arts and culture.

Therefore, it’s only natural that their About Us page features a compilation of various videos they host.

The content’s diversity and the team’s curatorial expertise are another reason to keep you browsing.

To stay in line with their video-centric aesthetic, the text on their page is short and concise.

However, it still provides enough guidance for browsing the website and even contributing.

Access the awards section and see why NOWNESS is currently a powerhouse in online film and video.

MailChimp About Us pageScreenshot from Mailchimp, January 2022

Millions of people use Mailchimp every day to create, send, and track email newsletters.

That’s the clever part behind Mailchimp’s About Page.

It’s a great example of how to use such a page as a sort of pre-sales platform.

It’s simple, fun and effective, quite colorful, and displays a welcoming mix of diverseness.

Tate About Us pageScreenshot from Tate, January 2022

Tate’s About Us states that their mission is to “increase the public’s enjoyment of British art […] and international modern and contemporary art.”

So said, so done.

How come?

Because this page eases the journey for any reader seeking to take them up on their mission.

Scroll down to find out who they are, how to stay in touch, and everything in between.

Yellow Leaf Hammocks About Us pageScreenshot from Yellow Leaf Hammocks, January 2022

Yellow Leaf Hammocks is trying to save the world one hammock at a time.

Their goal is to break the cycle of extreme poverty by empowering local artisans in Thailand to earn a stable income.

The brand’s About Page is filled with uplifting stories of impeccable craftsmanship and tight-knit communities.

As a result, it’s just as inspiring as their devotion to sustainable change.

Eight Hour Day About Us pageScreenshot from Eight Hour Day, January 2022

You had me at “Well hello there.”

Well, that’s exactly how the About Us section of Eight Hour Day starts – a welcoming greeting.

For that reason, it also made us browse for more.

Why?

Because as much as you love good design and inspiring illustrations, you also want to meet the people that curate all the content for you.

Furthermore, it’s equally rewarding when you realize that they are just as eager to start a visual dialogue with you.

Nathan Strandberg and Katie Kirk are doing what makes them happy, and this is obvious throughout their page.

Lonely Planet About Us pageScreenshot from Lonely Planet, January 2022

You know you’re about to hop on a journey when a website’s About Us page tells you to “Just go.”

This is a website for travelers, so the layout is perfect for those eager to explore.

As you scroll down, you discover what Lonely Planet stands for, and their visual aid offers a preview of their services.

The perks?

You see everything in one go and decide for yourself what you take on your journey.

Will it be their apps, their printed guides, or their website?

In any case, every resource becomes an inexhaustible well of travel inspiration.

So, are you ready to go?

Gummisig About Us pageScreenshot from Gummisig, January 2022

Gummisig is a freelance web designer who likes to talk about himself in the third person.

He also makes great use of oversized text to bring attention to his work in a humorous manner.

Perhaps what’s striking about this page is that it introduces Gummisig’s portfolio, but also reflects his free spirit and commitment.

And while he mentions the household names he worked for in the past, he remains approachable and open to new collaborations.

Scroll down to discover his preferred action items.

Hint: He wants to know your secrets!

Perhaps the most striking feature behind this page is that it acts as a preface to the designer’s portfolio, mirroring his free spirit and a remarkable passion for design.

While he proudly states the companies he has worked for (IKEA is just one of the bigger names to pop up), he does so in a manner that is not boastful.

Amnesty International About Us pageScreenshot from Amnesty International, January 2022

Amnesty International is more than an NGO.

It is a global movement of more than 7 million people that are campaigning for a better world, where human rights are central.

It is no wonder that the pronoun we is prevalent throughout their page.

Filled with quotes, videos, and testimonials, their page makes you believe that you can hope for a better world. And they have the facts to prove it, too.

If you scroll down, you can access all their accomplishments on the road toward better social change.

After you understand their global footprint, you should also imagine – imagine the possibility of a world where human rights are at the center of discussion.

Good enough reason to stay in touch, no?

Chattanooga Renaissance Fund About Us pageScreenshot from Chattanooga Renaissance Fund, January 2022

The top part of the Chattanooga Renaissance Fund page aims to attract entrepreneurs into the Chattanooga area of Tennessee.

How?

By describing its history and the companies that already invested there, such as Amazon or Volkswagen, to name a few.

Which begs the question: What prompted these companies to move there?

Find out by reading more about the fund’s members and how they contributed to its growth.

This is especially reassuring because they are also here to help you.

Whether you’re a startup, investor, or third party, the page has a dedicated section for all its users.

All you have to do is prove that you want to turn ideas into existence.

DORÉ About Us pageScreenshot from DORÉ, January 2022

This website started off as a photography blog founded by Garance Doré.

Eventually, it became a place for inspiration with a growing team that’s eager to question everything.

Whether it is style, femininity, or modern dilemmas, no topic remains off limits.

Ready to contribute to the discussion? By all means, you are most welcome.

The team reads all your comments and is ready to turn your thoughts into their command.

Not sure where to start?

Scroll down to see their work in videos and use the pictures at the bottom to access their Instagram page.

Bulldog Skincare About Us pageScreenshot from Bulldog Skincare, January 2022

How can you convince men to delve into skincare?

You bring their best friend on their side – a dog.

Meet Bulldog Skincare, the company that aims to make skincare options dedicated to men readily available.

To have you sold, their About Us page greets you with the adorable mug of a bulldog.

This quickly becomes your guide to finding the products that will help you look and feel your best.

As you scroll down, you are growing familiar with the products and are slowly but surely befriending the brand itself and its values.

Their skincare is made from a mix of natural and carefully-selected man-made ingredients.

It’s also vegan and certified by Cruelty Free International.

Their page is so good, it’s no wonder they have a ‘Shop Now’ button every step of the way.

Don’t mind if I do.

Couro Azul About Us pageScreenshot from Couro Azul, January 2022

Navigating through Couro Azul’s About Us page is like a journey through the unknown.

The kind of journey that keeps you scrolling down for more.

The company makes leather upholstery for cars and trains, and its history and trajectory are equally fascinating.

In addition to the visual delight, the page is also interactive and engaging.

Why?

So that you can understand what the company values from a first browse: 100% in-house products.

Their certificate for ecologic distinction attests to their commitment to environmental best practices.

Girlboss About Us pageScreenshot from Girlboss, January 2022

The entire Girlboss website is simply inspiring.

The brand aims to redefine success for millennial women – by providing the tools and connections they need to own their futures.

Girlboss empowers them by providing the tools and connections they need to own their futures.

Furthermore, every bit of content you’ll find on this site oozes with passion, humor, and resourcefulness.

These key traits are sewn into the fabric of Girlboss’ global success.

Purple, Rock, Scissors About Us pageScreenshot from Purple, Rock, Scissors, January 2022

If you want people to understand your company’s values, then put them in bold black and white print – just like Purple, Rock, Scissors did.

Their entire website is a technological marvel.

With its quaint background animation, concise content, and creative visuals, this page is definitely an eye-catcher.

There’s also an openness about it that will unfailingly draw you in.

Mixd About Us pageScreenshot from Mixd, January 2022

It’s not often that you see an About page that puts so much emphasis on its “meet the team” section.

Each member is portrayed with a short description and an almost full-body shot, complete with their social media accounts.

Boasting big, bold elements and sharp colors, this page excels at making a great first impression.

6tematik About Us pageScreenshot from 6tematik, January 2022

There are many things we love about this website, but for brevity’s sake, we’ll narrow it down to two.

First, their main page is highly interactive.

The simple act of pushing a key or moving the mouse reveals a key piece of info about the brand. Because of that, it feels like watching a modern silent movie.

The second thing is the way 6tematik introduces us to its team.

Each member is portrayed by a minimalist caricature that is defined by one obvious trait. Some have long pink hair, others a bushy beard or big glasses.

These traits add a touch of personality to each member’s portrait, without giving too much away.

Big Cartel About Us pageScreenshot from Big Cartel, January 2022

Made by artists for artists, Big Cartel is an online platform that makes it easy to build and manage an online store.

The simple yet impactful mission statement and the candid employee photographs make this About page refreshingly different.

Each photo in the gallery is unique and personal.

As a result, you won’t find any staged or boring ID-badge-type photos – just a wonderful display of diversity.

Final Takeaways

After analyzing in detail the 25 examples of About Us pages in this article, these are the final takeaways to keep in mind when crafting yours:

Creativity makes your page stand out.

For many companies, the About Us page is just a formality to fill in the sitemap rather than convey a unique marketing message.

However, some brands go beyond, designing eye-catching imagery and writing humorous copy to stand out from the competition. You need to find your unique angle for your About Us page to actually be read.

Feature the people behind the brand.

Whether you are a solopreneur, a dynamic duo agency, or a full-blown global enterprise with hundreds of team members, letting people shine makes an engaging About Us page.

Some of the examples in this article (such as Big Cartel), feature headshots packed with personality, which convey brand values better than any words.

Tie in social proof with your social responsibility.

Showcase results, but also convey the difference your organization is bringing to the world.

Yellow Leaf Hammocks and Mailchimp are two examples from this article that feature on their About Us page how their products are changing their communities for the better.

More resources:


Featured Image: Naumova Marina/Shutterstock




Source link

SEO

What Is A Sitemap? Do I Need One?

Published

on

What Is A Sitemap? Do I Need One?

Sitemap. While this is a term you may be familiar with, what does it mean?

Do you need one? Where do you find one? How do you make one?

These are valid questions; for some, there might be more than one answer.

Today, we will take a deep dive into the sitemap world, so that you can walk away with the necessary answers and confidence around the topic!

What Is A Sitemap?

Let’s start here.

Defining a sitemap is essential for several reasons, and we are going to go through the two main types that apply to technical SEO: XML and HTML sitemaps.

XML Sitemap

An XML sitemap is a file that provides a website’s essential pages, videos, and other important files for Google to discover when crawling the site.

Not only are these listed in the file, but the sitemap can also provide details for Google to know – for instance, when the page was last updated, and if the content is available in other languages.

As I mentioned, you can also provide details about content types like videos, photos, and news-related content, specifically in your XML sitemap.

According to the Google Developers Sitemaps section, the following can be included for specific types of content in your sitemap:

  • A sitemap video entry can specify the video running time, rating, and age-appropriateness rating.
  • A sitemap image entry can include the location of the images included on a page.
  • A sitemap news entry can include the article title and publication date.

Next, we will talk about what an HTML sitemap is and the differences between the two.

HTML Sitemap

An HTML sitemap is more targeted for users on your site than for Google.

This is a page that exists on your site and has links to the pages on your website – and in some cases, includes a little context into what those pages are.

Google mentions that you should try to establish a consistent and clear hierarchy on the HTML sitemap as, although not its purpose, it can help with indexation.

You can think of an HTML sitemap as a directory that users can leverage to navigate your site and find what they need.

An HTML sitemap should not be an attempt to replace the important pages in your site’s navigation.

XML Sitemaps Vs. HTML Sitemaps

So, what are the key differences between these two types of sitemaps? Let’s review.

XML

  • The intent is for Google and other bots.
  • There is no hierarchy.
  • Used primarily for indexing.
  • You can submit via Google Webmaster Tools.

HTML

  • The intent is for users.
  • A hierarchy should be used.
  • No place to submit in Google Webmaster Tools.

Do You Need A Sitemap?

If you are wondering if you need a sitemap, that depends!

First, let’s discuss the XML sitemap. There are a few questions you can ask to determine if you need an XML sitemap:

  • How big is your site? Is it large enough that Google may miss newly updated content when it is crawling?
  • Is your site relatively new? If so, it may not have a ton of external links on the Internet that point to it to help Google discover it. Even if your site isn’t new, and you don’t have external links, your answer to this question should be yes.
  • Is your site content heavy? Do you have many photos, videos, news content, etc.?
  • Does your site need a better architecture that results in pages not being well linked to each other? This can also be the case with archived and orphan pages you want to be indexed.

If you answered yes to any of the questions above, then yes, it is best practice to have an XML sitemap.

Even if you answered no to all of the above, I would recommend an XML sitemap for a few reasons; If your site grows, expands its scope, and other situations may arise, having a sitemap will be beneficial!

Next, let’s review whether it makes sense for you to have an HTML sitemap.  Depending on where you look, you will find that answer to be yes or no.

HTML sitemaps are known to be an older concept, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have one.

The XML sitemap has the information needed for Google to crawl, index, and learn other important information about these pages. However, an XML sitemap does not show hierarchy like an HTML sitemap.

Google will crawl the links on your site, and including an HTML sitemap could allow Google to understand your site’s architecture and relationships better.

This is even more useful for sites that have an incredibly large number of pages.

So, is having an HTML sitemap critical? No, it is not.

It is also not a cure-all for a poorly architected and nested website. While it isn’t a critical element of success, it has shown benefits that make having one a best practice.

To close this topic out, I recommend you have an XML and HTML sitemap because let’s be honest, why not, when the pros outweigh the cons very clearly?

Now you may be wondering how to create these two assets and what to do with them – so, let’s jump into some ways you can create these files and where to put them on the site.

How To Create An XML Sitemap

First, we will go over how you can generate sitemaps from scratch, and then we will get into some great tools that can do it for you.

XML sitemaps have specific criteria in order to be rendered valid.

Screenshot from lowes.com, January 2023

Below are a few specific requirements for XML sitemaps:

  • Begin with a <urlset> tag and end with that tag closing </urlset>.
  • Include the protocol you are using within the <urlset> tag.
  • Each URL entry must have a <url> tag as a parent XML tag.
  • Include a <loc> child entry for each <url> parent tag.
  • Each sitemap can only contain up to 50,000 URLs and 50MB.
  • Must be UTF-encoded.

XML Sitemap Best Practices

Now, let’s look at some key best practices when it comes to creating XML sitemaps:

  • Only URLs you want to be indexed should appear in your sitemap. This means no redirected URLs, non-canonical URLs, or pages marked as no-index.
  • Do not use session Ids.
  • Only include the primary if you have two versions (mobile and desktop) of your site.
  • Include media assets like videos, photos, and news items.
  • Use hreflang to show Google that there are alternative language versions of your website.
  • Google documentation notes it leverages <lastmod>, but only if it’s consistent and verifiable. If you can’t keep this accurate, don’t use it.
  • Google ignores the <priority> and <changefreq> tags at this time, according to John Mueller on this Search Off the Record podcast.
  • Google will not crawl your URLs in the order they are listed, nor does it guarantee indexation.
  • Your sitemap should be updated regularly – automatically, or manually – or Google may not trust it.

Now, if you felt lost reading those beginning requirements, that is okay, because there are tools to help you achieve your desired outcomes! We will go over some later in this article.

Check out the refined version below:

refined sitemap of lowes.comScreenshot from lowes.com, January 2023

How To Create An HTML Sitemap

When putting together an HTML sitemap, remember its purpose is to serve a user on the site and help Google understand the hierarchy of your website.

You do not want to no index this page from Google; keep it crawlable!

You will want to ensure you don’t just throw thousands of links on an HTML sitemap page with no sense of organization, as this won’t help anyone – bots included.

Home Depot sitemapScreenshot from Home Depot, January 2023

HTML Sitemap Best Practices

Let’s go over a few quick best practices when it comes to HTML sitemaps:

  • Arrange the page’s structure to align with your website’s structure. You will want to make sure that the hierarchy is easily understood.
  • The HTML sitemap should be located somewhere the user can easily find it. You will often see it in the footer links of a website.
  • Use anchor text that is valuable to the user.

Need a little help getting started? No worries – there are plenty of tools to help you.

Sitemap Generator Tools

There are a number of tools to help you generate different types of sitemaps. Let’s go over a few now.

XML Sitemap Generator Tools

  • Screaming Frog – This tool is a great option for generating a sitemap, especially if you want to generate one after crawling your URLs. Screaming Frog is free if you have under 1,000 URLs, but you would have to buy a license if you have more.
  • XML-Sitemaps.com – This web-based application allows you to enter your website URL and it generates an XML file for you. This is a free tool for up to 500 URLs.

Depending on which CMS you are leveraging, there are also thousands of XML sitemap generator plug-ins, but be cautious as even the best generator tools have their limitations, so make sure to double-check the output.

Here are a few popular XML sitemap plugins for WordPress:

HTML Sitemap Generator Tools

  • com: this is a free online tool where you can scan your website URL or upload a document to generate an HTML sitemap. As we discussed earlier, there may be better approaches than a generator if your site is poorly architected.
  • Crawler: Like Eli mentions, if you have a large site and are already using a crawler like OnCrawl, DeepCrawl, Screaming Frog, or SiteBulb, you can leverage the output from a crawl to help generate your HTML sitemap.

Like XML sitemaps, there are also a variety of CMS plugins for creating HTML sitemaps. Here are a few for WordPress:

In Conclusion

Sitemaps have existed in the SEO world for some time as a method for helping search engines discover and crawl websites.

And, while having a sitemap isn’t always necessary for every site, it certainly doesn’t hurt – and can be especially useful for both new and large sites.

When you are determining your next steps for creating a sitemap for your website – whether XML or HTML – I hope you can leverage this guide to decide which path makes the most sense for your site’s needs.

More resources: 


Featured Image: Sammby/Shutterstock



Source link

Continue Reading

SEO

Keyword Mapping. A Practical Guide for the Curious

Published

on

Keyword Mapping. A Practical Guide for the Curious

Deciding whether a keyword should be targeted by a separate page or clustered with other keywords is a common problem in SEO. Keyword mapping is a process aimed at solving this.

Keyword mapping is popularly defined as assigning keywords to pages. But what you really need to solve the problem is assigning topics to content types

In this article, I’ll explain the benefits of this approach and, more importantly, I’ll show you the process. No templates required.

Benefits of keyword mapping (the alternative way) 

Fact 1. Google may see seemingly different keywords as the same topic.

For example, we rank for these keywords in the top 10 with a single page: 

  • seo basics”
  • how to use seo” 
  • beginner’s guide to seo”
  • getting started with seo”
  • seo knowledge”

Fact 2. Conversely, Google may see seemingly similar keywords as different topics. 

For example, let’s compare “digital marketing” with “online marketing.” I’d say those two keywords are pretty close to each other. Google disagrees. 

Low SERP similarity score signals potentially different topics
Everywhere you look, the same story. Top-ranking pages and our SERP similarity score (100-point scale; the more, the higher similarity) say that these are completely different topics SEO-wise.

The above two facts are also reasons why keyword mapping by just relying on keywords is not the optimal way. You won’t know whether you’re wasting your time targeting the same topic with different keywords or just “confusing” Google. 

But why content types instead of pages or even URLs? Because before you decide what page will be used to target the keyword, you’ll need to identify the search intent of the keyword. And a good starting point for that is identifying the dominating type of content on the first page of Google. 

To sum up, the benefits of keyword mapping using topics and content types are: 

  • Seeing keywords the same way Google sees them: as topics and subtopics. 
  • Incorporating search intent into the process. 
  • Keeping an organized list of topics, which also helps to prevent duplicating content.

Note

Keyword mapping can’t substitute keyword research. While keyword mapping is basically a form of organizing keywords, keyword research provides you the keywords and the confidence that: 

  • Your keywords have traffic potential.
  • You can match the search intent behind your keywords.
  • Your keywords will bring valuable traffic. 
  • You can rank for those keywords. 

Learn how to choose the right keywords with our full guide.

Going further, we’ll look at two levels of using this method: the fast lane and the more thorough one. 

Learn more: What Is Semantic Search? How It Impacts SEO 

Level 1 – Fast, reasonable job

You’ll need a keyword research tool that can do keyword grouping based on what’s on the SERP, such as Ahrefs’ Keywords Explorer. In the case of this tool: 

  1. Enter your keywords
  2. Open Matching terms report
  3. Go to the Parent topics tab 
Three steps to find Parent Topics via Keywords Explorer

If you click on a Parent Topic, you will find separate topics “distilled” from your keywords. So for example, you will see keywords like “can babies get covid” and “babies and covid” grouped under the same topic. 

Keywords grouped under the same Parent Topic

Sidenote.

To identify the Parent Topic, we take the #1 ranking page for your keyword and find the keyword responsible for sending the most traffic to that page.

At this level of keyword mapping, your target keyword is the Parent Topic (not the keywords inside that Parent Topic). 

The next step is to identify the content type. The easiest way to do this is to see what kind of content dominates the first three to five results in Google. 

Typical content types are:

  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Product pages
  • Product category pages
  • Landing pages 
Top-ranking pages with a dominating content type
For example, the dominating content type for “teething symptoms” is the article.

As a result, assigning topics to content types will give you a super simple yet highly actionable database.

Topic Content type
Teething symptoms Article
When do babies roll over Article
Baby formula Mixed (product pages on top)
When can babies have water Article

Sidenote.

What about secondary keywords or supporting keywords? We recommend picking them in the content creation phase as subtopics needed to cover a topic in full. Learn a few ways you can find them here.

So this is the fast method. The great thing about it is that it automates keyword grouping by using real SERP data (and not just semantics). 

However, it has its downsides too. Sometimes, it “hides” less popular topics that could potentially be targeted with a separate page. Here’s why. 

The parent keyword is derived from the top-ranking page on the SERP. If Google thinks that the best answer to the query is found on a page that is targeting a broader topic, it will still use it. This may result in a confusing SERP like this one: 

Confusing SERP example
The top result is a featured snippet taken from a page with a broader topic. Hence, the Parent Topic (here seen as “Top keyword”) in Ahrefs. But pretty much every other page on the SERP targets the keywords directly.

This kind of situation probably won’t happen too often. But if you want to squeeze everything out of your keyword mapping process, you need to go to level 2. 

Level 2 – Thorough but time consuming

In level 2, we’re going to take a closer look at the Parent Topics to see what’s in them. 

  1. First, you should pick a Parent Topic.
  2. Sort keywords inside the topic by KD (Keyword Difficulty). Big differences in KD will be an indication of a different set of pages on the SERP.
  3. If you see a keyword with a significantly different KD than the Parent Topic, click on the SERP button.
  4. See if the top-ranking pages, excluding the first result, talk about the keyword instead of the Parent Topic. You can use the Compare with feature for a quick overview of the situation. The lower the SERP similarity score, the higher the probability you’re looking at two different topics. 
How to investigate Parent Topics

Let’s look at a couple of examples. 

In the first example, we’ve got a keyword with a KD score that’s 20 higher than the Parent Topic. Upon investigating, we see that we may be dealing with two separate topics: The SERP similarity is quite low. Also, there is only one common result, while other pages target the keyword directly. 

Keywords grouped under the same topic but have dissimilar SERPs

Next example. Here we have “teething symptoms” (KD 65) and “when do babies get molars” (KD 28). Looking at SERP similarity, we see that this, again, may be a case of two topics. 

Low SERP similarity between two keywords

But there’s more. Only the bottom results target the keyword directly. Others talk about teething timelines, stages, charts, etc. This is a hint for yet another way to rank for the keyword. 

Only bottom results target the keyword directly

Generally speaking, when you see that you’re dealing with a separate topic “in disguise,” the decision comes down to:

  1. Targeting the Parent Topic anyway. For example, if the top result is a featured snippet, you may be able to win it with a page on a relevant broader topic. 
  2. Marking the keyword as a separate topic and targeting it directly with a separate page. In this case, add that keyword as a topic to target and note down the content type. 
  3. Turning to SERP analysis in tougher cases (like our example above). 

Final thoughts 

Feel free to customize the process and add your own data points. If you feel like going a step further and assigning URLs, your website folders, or introducing some kind of prioritization (e.g., business potential), this won’t hurt. 

However, keep in mind that keyword mapping is not a good way to design your entire website structure. Most often than not, not all pages on your site should be search-based. 

What are the next steps after keyword mapping? 

Got comments or questions? Ping me on Twitter or Mastodon



Source link

Continue Reading

SEO

Everything You Need To Know

Published

on

Of all the many, many functions available in Google Ads, I have a few that are my favorites. And sitelink assets – previously known as sitelink extensions – are at the top of my list.

Why? Because they’re so versatile. You can do almost anything with them if you think through your strategy carefully.

For example, you can use the mighty sitelink in your advertising to:

  • Promote low search volume themes.
  • Push lagging products out the door.
  • Maximize hot sellers.
  • Highlight certain product categories.
  • Answer common questions.
  • Handle PR problems.

And that’s just a start! Sitelink assets can almost do it all.

Best Practices For Using Sitelink Assets Extensions

If you truly want to get the most out of your sitelinks, you need to think about your intention.

To help you with that, I’m going to lay out a few sitelink guidelines.

1. Get clear on your objectives. Before you start, you need to think about your goals. What are you trying to achieve with these assets? Are you advertising products or services? Will the asset work well with both branded and non-branded keywords? Your answers to these questions will help determine if your sitelinks are versatile and useful to the searcher.

2. Use sitelinks as part of your larger strategy. Don’t think of your sitelinks in isolation. You should also consider the accompanying ad, landing page, and other assets. Make sure they all work together in service to your overarching strategy.

3. Use a mix of sitelinks. Sitelinks can serve multiple purposes, so make sure you’re using a variety. For example, you don’t want to use every sitelink on an ad to promote on-sale products. Instead, use a mix. One could promote an on-sale product, one could generate leads, one could highlight a new product category, and one could direct prospective clients to useful information.

4. Create landing pages for your sitelinks. Ideally, you want to send users to landing pages that tightly correlate with your sitelink instead of just a regular page on your website.

5. Track sitelink performance and adjust. It’s not enough to set up sitelinks. You should also track them to see which links are getting traction and which ones are not. This doesn’t mean that all sitelinks should perform equally (more on this below), but it does mean they should perform well given their type and objectives.

Why it’s Better To Use A Mix Of Sitelink Assets

Let’s dive deeper into this idea of using a mix of sitelinks by looking at an example.

In a new client account, we created four different types of sitelinks:

  • Two sitelinks are product-focused (as requested by the client).
  • One sitelink connects users with an engineer to learn more about the product (“Speak to an Engineer”). It has more of a sales focus.
  • One sitelink allows users to learn more about the products without speaking to an engineer (“What is?”).

The “What is?” sitelink is outperforming the “Speak to an Engineer” sitelink when we measure by CTR. While we need more data before making any changes, I predict we’ll eventually swap out the sales-y “Speak to an Engineer” sitelink for something else.

The fact that the educational link (“What is?”) is performing better than the sales-y link (“Speak to an Engineer”) isn’t too surprising in this case. The product is a new, cutting-edge robot that not many people are aware of, yet. They want more info before talking to someone.

Screenshot by author, January 2023

By using a mix of sitelinks, and assessing the performance of each, we gained a lot of valuable information that is helping to guide our strategy for this account. So going with a mix of sitelinks is always a good idea. You never know what you’ll discover!

Sitelink Assets Examples

Now, let’s look at some specific examples of sitelink assets in Google Ads.

Example 1: Chromatography

Sitelinks extension - Chromatography exampleScreenshot from Google, January 2023

Application Search: This ad is for a highly technical product that can be used in a wide variety of applications. (Chromatography is a laboratory technique for separating mixtures.) So putting “application search” in a sitelink here might make sense. It helps prospective clients find what they’re looking for.

Sign up and Save Big: A good sitelink for lead generation and potential revenue.

Technical Support: I’m not a big fan of putting technical support in sitelinks. Tech support seems more targeted to current users rather than prospective users. But who knows, maybe they really do want to help current users get tech support via their advertising.

Guides and Posters: Again, this sitelink is a bit unusual, but it might be appropriate for this product. Perhaps people are downloading branded posters and posting them in their workplaces. If so, it’s a great way to build brand awareness.

Example 2: Neuroscience Courses

Sitelink Extensions - Nueroscience courses exampleScreenshot from Google, January 2023

I love everything about these sitelinks! The advertising is using them to reach people in all phases of the buyer journey.

For people not ready to commit:

  • Study Neuroscience: This sitelink is broad and informational. It’s helpful to people who have just started to explore their options for studying neuroscience.
  • Get Course Brochure: This sitelink is also great for people in the research phase. And while we mostly live in an online world, some people still prefer to consume hard-copy books, brochures, etc. With this sitelink, the school is covering its bases.

For people getting close to committing:

  • Online Short Course: This is the course the school offers. It’s a great sitelink for those almost ready to sign up.

For people ready to sign up:

  • Register Online Now: This is the strongest call to action for those ready to commit. It takes people directly to the signup page.

Example 3: Neuroscience Degrees

Let’s look at another example from the world of neuroscience education: this time for a neuroscience degree program.

Sitelink extensions - neuroscience degree exampleScreenshot from Google, January 2023

In contrast to the previous two examples, the sitelinks in this ad aren’t as strong.

Academics Overview: This sitelink seems more appropriate for a broad term search, such as a search on the school’s name. If the searcher is looking for a specific degree program (which seems like the intention based on the term and the ad), the sitelinks should be something specific to that particular degree program.

Scholarships: Just as with the above sitelink, “Scholarships” doesn’t seem very helpful either. The topic of scholarships is important—but probably doesn’t need to be addressed until the person determines that this school is a good fit.

Example 4: Code Security

Next, let’s look at two Google search ads for code security products.

Sitelink extensions - code security exampleScreenshot from Google, January 2023

 

The sitelinks in these two ads look like typical assets you’d find for SaaS, cloud-based, or tech companies. They click through to a lot of helpful information, such as product plans and success stories.

I particularly like the Most Common Risks sitelink in the second ad. It leads to a helpful article that would be great for engaging top-of-funnel leads.

On the flip side, I’m not a big fan of the Blog sitelink in the first ad. “Blog” simply isn’t very descriptive or helpful.

Still, there are no right or wrong sitelinks here. And it would be interesting to test my theory that blog content is not a top-performing asset!

Sitelink Assets Are More Than An Afterthought

I hope I’ve convinced you of the usefulness and versatility of sitelinks when created with specific objectives that align with your broader strategy.

So don’t create your sitelink assets as an afterthought.

Because if you give them the careful consideration they deserve, they’ll serve you well.

Note: Google sitelink assets were previously known as sitelink extensions and renamed in September 2022.

More resources:


Featured Image: Thaspol Sangsee/Shutterstock



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending

en_USEnglish