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Google Ads Account Managers Shouldn’t Contact Clients Directly

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Google Ads Account Managers Shouldn’t Contact Clients Directly

There are a growing number of reports across the web of Google Ads accounts managers threatening to contact clients directly, despite not being allowed to.

According to the reports, agencies who don’t respond to emails from Google Ads account managers are being met with threats from Google reps to contact clients directly.

In some cases, the Google Ads account managers call clients and tell them to drop their agencies.

There are two things to make clear here:

  1. Agencies are not required to speak with Google reps
  2. At no point should a Google Ads account manager call an agency’s client

A Google Ads rep telling clients to fire their agency crosses the line.

However, these reports are becoming more frequent.

Matt Janaway, CEO of Marketing Labs, shared his experience on LinkedIn this week:

Screenshot from: linkedin.com/posts/mattjanaway, November 2022.

Janaway’s post caught the attention of Google Ads Liaison Ginny Marvin, who says the issue will be addressed “immediately.”

Marvin adds, “This is not in line with how we expect our team to support our advertisers and agency partners.”

Google Ads Account Managers Shouldn’t Contact Clients DirectlyScreenshot from: linkedin.com/posts/mattjanaway, November 2022.

Janaway isn’t alone in his experience.

Throughout October, reports circulated on Reddit of Google reps engaging in similar practices.

One Reddit user posted a screenshot of an email received by a Google Ads Account Strategist, which reads:

“I am writing to you one last time as a courtesy, because my honest goal is to provide you value and advanced strategies with google ads and work with you closely, to help you save time and make your clients more successful with google ads , thus I am contacting you for the last time to inform you that if I do not reach you, I will assume that you are not getting my emails and will contact the clients that I have been assigned directly.”

Another Reddit user has nearly the same story, saying they’ve been “harassed” with daily emails from a Google Ads rep to get on a call and implement campaign changes.

Again, agencies aren’t obligated to speak with Google reps or implement changes clients aren’t asking for.

Should you receive an email like the one above, the best thing to do is submit a complaint via Google’s official form.

Beware of these aggressive sales tactics. As long as you’re not breaking any policies, Google has no say over how you run your clients’ campaigns.


Featured Image: FGC/Shutterstock



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LinkedIn Newsletters: What I’ve Learned (So Far)

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LinkedIn Newsletters: What I've Learned (So Far)

Four weeks ago, I launched my LinkedIn newsletter called The Well-Branded Woman.

It’s been a freaky, fun-filled ride, complete with unexpected twists and turns. What I thought was going to happen didn’t – and what did happen blew my mind.

Here’s what I did and what I’ve learned (so far!).

Here’s how I set up my first LinkedIn newsletter:

 

I used market research to build excitement.

A week and a half before I launched my newsletter, I created a LinkedIn poll telling people about my new newsletter focus (Gen X and Millennial women) and asking what I should name it.

I wanted to ensure the name would “click” with my target reader. Plus, I wanted to build awareness that I’d be launching a newsletter soon.

If I were to do it again, I would have allowed at least two weeks for this process – maybe a bit more. It worked out because I had some strong newsletter names to test – but the timeline would have been too short if I had started from scratch.

I created attention-grabbing graphics for the newsletter.

My midlife-aged readers would want to know that I was in their age group, so my wonderfully talented designer created a bright orange featured image template with my photo front and center. I wanted a color and design that popped off the page — plus LinkedIn says that images with faces “resonate more with audiences.”

Graphics in hand, I was ready to write my first article where…

I immediately dropped multiple actionable tips in my first LinkedIn newsletter article.

My first article was about how Gen X and Millennial women can transform themselves into online thought leaders. I purposely wrote a very long, informative piece that shared tips I didn’t see anywhere else and were specific to my audience.

I also wove in personal information to help the reader get to know me.

The final article was over 1,800 words – way longer than I had planned. I was curious if anyone would read all those words, but I knew the article provided solid, actionable information.

I also invited women to connect with me and to DM me.

What are my LinkedIn newsletter results (so far?)

 

  • By the end of the first day after publication, I had 163 subscribers. I was so happy! LinkedIn automatically sends subscribers an email as soon as I publish a newsletter, so I reach these readers directly.
  • By that following Monday, I had over four hundred subscribers. I was even happier!
  • And then, a LinkedIn editor found my article and promoted it on the home feed. All of a sudden, my LinkedIn DMs blew up. Women read my article and vibed with my message. Responding to everyone took more than eight hours, spread over two days. It was amazing!
  • Since then, the article has been viewed over 100,000 times and has received over 1,000 likes and over 130 comments. And yes, I responded to all of those comments. Why?
  • It’s not enough to simply post on LinkedIn and call it good. If you want to build a community, that means engaging with your audience right after they post and helping them feel seen. By doing so, I was able to start some fantastic conversations with women who would never have opened up to me any other way.

Today, the newsletter has almost 1,700 subscribers. And yes, that first article is positioning!

My LinkedIn newsletter future feels bright.

What I’m (still) learning about LinkedIn newsletters:

 

  • I’ve created SEO writing articles for so long that I naturally thought that’s what this audience would want to learn from me. It was a delightful surprise to know my new audience is looking for personal branding tips and how to future-proof their careers.
  • I had to throw my editorial calendar out the window, but I’m okay with that. I’m creating articles on the fly as I read the comments and get a sense of what women what to know.
  • I’m still figuring out how to monetize. Right now, creating the newsletter costs me time and money. Would I like to make money from it? Yes, but the time isn’t right. I don’t quite know what the audience needs. I’d rather listen and wait.

I’m playing the long game.

Would I recommend LinkedIn newsletters for other B2B consultants or companies? Yes. It’s turning out to be a powerful content tactic. Overwhelming, but powerful.

Plus, if you’re a freelancer, you could sell LinkedIn newsletter creation and maintenance services. Many B2B companies are new to LinkedIn newsletters, so knowing how to plan and write them could open up a new profit center. Especially if you work with thought leaders and consultants who need branding — but don’t have time to write.

My take: LinkedIn newsletters get a thumbs up.

I’ll keep you posted on my progress.

What do you think?

Are you considering trying LinkedIn newsletters (or suggesting them to your client)? Leave a comment and let me know. 

Oh, and if you want to know how your hero’s journey can help you build your personal brand, check out my latest Charisma Boost post.

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