Connect with us

SEO

Google Gives Sites More Indexing Control With New Robots Tag

Published

on

Google Gives Sites More Indexing Control With New Robots Tag


A new robots tag, called indexifembedded, lets websites give Google more direction over which content to index in search results.

With this tag you can tell Google to only index content on a page if it’s embedded through iframes and similar HTML tags.

The indexifembedded tag overrides the noindex tag.

That means you can use noindex to keep a whole URL out of search results, and apply the indexifembedded tag to make a specific piece of content indexable when it’s embedded on another webpage.

Google says it created this tag to fix an issue affecting media publishers:

“… while they may want their content indexed when it’s embedded on third-party pages, they don’t necessarily want their media pages indexed on their own.”

When To Use The Indexifembedded Tag

This new robots tag is not something that applies to a lot of publishers, as it’s intended for content that has a separate URL for embedding purposes.

For example, a publisher of a podcast may have webpages dedicated to each podcast episode, which each have their own URLs.

Then there would be URLs pointing directly to the media, which other sites can use to embed the podcast on one of their pages.

Such a URL might be used when inserting a podcast episode as a source of reference, like I recently did in an article about Googlebot crawling.

The podcast creator may not want the media URLs indexed in search results. Previously, the only way to keep them out of Google Search was with a noindex tag.

However, the noindex tag prevents embedding the content in other pages during indexing. So if the publisher wanted to allow embeddeding they were forced to have the media URL indexed as well.

Now, with the indexifembedded tag, publishers have more control over what gets indexed.

The indexifembedded tag can be used with the noindex tag, and will override it when the URL with noindex is embedded into another page through an iframe or similar HTML tag.

Google offers the following example:

“For example, if podcast.host.example/playpage?podcast=12345 has both the noindex and indexifembedded tag, it means Google can embed the content hosted on that page in recipe.site.example/my-recipes.html during indexing.”

How To Use The Indexifembedded Tag

There are two ways to use this new robots tag.

To enable your content to be indexed only when it’s embedded on other pages, add the indexifembedded tag in combination with the noindex tag.

See an example of what the code would look like in the image below:

Screenshot from: developers.google.com/search/blog/, January 2022.

Alternatively, you can specify the tag in the HTTP header.

Refer to the image below for an example of how that would look.

google indexifembedded tagScreenshot from: developers.google.com/search/blog/, January 2022.

Currently, only Google supports the indexifembedded tag.

Source: Google Search Central Blog


Featured Image: IgorGolovniov/Shutterstock 





Source link

SEO

Google Shares New Info About Vulnerabilities Found In Chrome

Published

on

Google Shares New Info About Vulnerabilities Found In Chrome

Google security researchers are sharing new information about vulnerabilities detected in Chrome, Firefox, and Windows.

In a blog post, Google and Threat Analysis Group (TAG) detail steps taken since discovering a commercial spyware operation with ties to Variston IT.

Based in Barcelona, Spain, Variston IT claims to provide custom security solutions. However, the company is connected to an exploitation framework called “Heliconia.”

Heliconia works in three ways:

  • It exploits a Chrome renderer bug to run malware on a user’s operating system.
  • It deploys a malicious PDF document containing an exploit for Windows Defender.
  • It utilizes a set of Firefox exploits for Windows and Linux machines.

The Heliconia exploit was used as early as December 2018 with the release of Firefox 64.

New information released by Google reveals Heliconia was likely used in the wild as a zero-day exploit.

Heliconia poses no risk to users today, as Google says it cannot detect active exploitation. Google, Mozilla, and Microsoft fixed the bugs in early 2021 and 2022.

Although Heliconia is patched, commercial spyware is a growing problem, Google says:

“TAG’s research underscores that the commercial surveillance industry is thriving and has expanded significantly in recent years, creating risk for Internet users around the globe. Commercial spyware puts advanced surveillance capabilities in the hands of governments who use them to spy on journalists, human rights activists, political opposition and dissidents.”

To protect yourself against Heliconia and other exploits like it, it’s essential to keep your internet browsers and operating system up to date.

TAG’s research into Heliconia is available in Google’s new blog post, which Google is publishing to raise awareness about the threat of commercial spyware.


Source: Google

Featured Image: tomfallen/Shutterstock



Source link

Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending

en_USEnglish