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Clubhouse Adds New Way to Share Rooms, Additional Analytics and Access Options

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Clubhouse Adds New Way to Share Rooms, Additional Analytics and Access Options


Clubhouse has added a new way to improve Room discovery, with a new re-share option that will enable users to highlight interesting sessions that they’re in to other users.

The process is essentially Clubhouse’s version of re-tweeting, in order to help amplify great discussions.

As explained by Clubhouse:

Now when you tap the “Share” button at the bottom of a room (or Replay), you’ll see three options: Share on Clubhouse, share via a social network, or copy the link to share via a messaging app. If you select Share on Clubhouse, you’ll be able to add a comment (e.g., “This person is rapping people’s bios and it’s insane”) and then share it to your followers. They’ll see this room in their Hallway and, if the room is live, also be notified that you shared it so they can come join you.

To be clear, Clubhouse has had the share via social network and share via messaging app options for some time, it’s only the new, internal sharing function that’s been added.

Discovery has proven to be a major challenge for audio social platforms, as it had been previously with video live-streaming, because while giving everyone the capacity to stream content provides functional benefit, the challenge, from an audience-building standpoint, is that it also means a lot of low-quality broadcasts will inevitably be added into the mix.

Every video streaming app found the same, with initial hype drawing audiences in, then quality issues seeing them drop-off.

Blab founder Shaan Puri summed up the challenges with live-stream quality in his announcement of the demise of that app back in 2016:

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The struggle with live-streaming is that we need to show you something awesome that’s being made right now. Turns out, that’s really tough. It killed Meerkat, and Periscope & FB Live are feeling the pain right now. In live-streaming, the churn is real. We hoped replays would help, but less than 10% of all watch time was on replays. Why? Because the off-the-cuff, unpredictable nature of livestreams make for terrible replays.”

The challenge of showcasing the best of live-streaming content, in real time, as Puri notes, has killed off many a platform entirely, and while audiences will reliably tune into the best, most interesting streams, relative to their interests, in order to do that, they need to know when they’re happening, which puts the onus on the platforms to come up with better algorithms and recommendation processes to highlight such at any given time.

No platform has got this right yet, and Clubhouse’s new share option is another step in this direction. Which is unlikely to end up being a major element in the broader battle, but it is another step to help move things in the right direction.

But the real value will be in building a stable recommendation system that can let you know, as soon as you go to listen, what you should tune into. The platform that can get this right stands to maximize the full value of live audio – but if they can’t, each will continue to lose audience interest over time.

In this respect, Facebook’s approach, in restricting its audio broadcast options to popular users and groups could be a better, more targeted way to go, while LinkedIn also looks set to see more value from its own take on audio social by tying it into its events offering.

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Both Twitter and Clubhouse, meanwhile, have a big challenge in filtering the mass of streams down for each user.

In addition to the new share option, Clubhouse is also launching new analytics, with share and clip counts now displayed at the bottom of each room, and a new Room insights page now in development.

That could help refine your audio strategy, with increased information on audience specifics, in order to better target and plan your future activity.

On another front, Clubhouse has also added web listening, which will enable anyone to listen to a Clubhouse room from their phone or laptop, without needing to download the app.

“To start, [web listening] will work for both Replays and live Rooms with Replays enabled, and will include support for most major browsers. It will be rolling out as an experiment in the US starting today. If you find it useful, we’ll plan to expand support to cover more room types, more countries, and more parts of the full Clubhouse experience over time.

It’s hard to say what the future holds for Clubhouse, the much-hyped star of the early part of last year. At one stage, Clubhouse was valued at $4 billion, and was being touted by some as the future of social connection, but as competitors rose, and audience interest waned, it has seemed, to many, like the app was indeed a flash in the pan, a fad that holds little value moving forward.

But Clubhouse is still moving forward. The app was downloaded 2.6 million times in December (up from 1.8 million in November), and while US audiences are less interested than they once were, the app has surged in the Indian market, which holds huge potential, if it can maintain a hold in the space.

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And there is value in niche communities and engagement in the app. Sure, the initial projections may have been overhyped, but there is still potential in the platform, which could carve a space for itself, if it can continue to evolve, and align with specific use cases.

It may not be the place to be, in a broader sense, but it is still worth checking in on Clubhouse rooms, and tuning into relevant chats as you find them. The capacity to share with connections will add to this.



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Google Proposes New ‘Topics’ Approach to Replace Cookie Tracking

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Google Proposes New 'Topics' Approach to Replace Cookie Tracking


As part of its ongoing effort to phase out third-party cookie tracking, and replace it with a new, privacy-friendly data insights process for web publishers, Google has today announced a shift in its approach, with a new topic-based structure now being proposed to both protect user privacy and facilitate publisher insight.

The new process will replace Google’s FLoC, or ‘Federated Learning of Cohorts’ process, which it had been working on to replace cookies.

As explained by Google:

With Topics, your browser determines a handful of topics, like “Fitness” or “Travel & Transportation,” that represent your top interests for that week based on your browsing history. Topics are kept for only three weeks and old topics are deleted. Topics are selected entirely on your device without involving any external servers, including Google servers. When you visit a participating site, Topics picks just three topics, one topic from each of the past three weeks, to share with the site and its advertising partners.”

So instead of providing more specific insight on individual user behaviors and interests, Google would enable advertisers and publishers to utilize topics for tracking, protecting user information while also catering to third-party data needs.

Which makes some sense, though there are some provisos that will need to be ironed out before Google takes its topics approach live.

For one, Google says that the topics list would be limited to around 350 topics “to reduce the risk of fingerprinting”. Which would indeed ensure enhanced privacy, but if Google was to increase the number of topics, that could become problematic, enabling more specific, and potentially discriminatory targeting based on these elements.

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For its part, Google says that its list of topics is thoughtfully curated to exclude sensitive categories, such as gender or race”. So it should cover off on any such concerns, but still, the more options available, the more specific targeting can get, which may not be a significant enough improvement on current data privacy processes.

Another key question, much like Apple’s ATT update, is whether Google itself will be bound by the same tracking limitations as its customers.

Evidence suggests that Apple is not limited by the same data-privacy requirements as the apps that utilize its network, and with Google having direct access to the raw response data, it too would be able to use that as a market advantage, improving its own position.

That’s the basis of several current legal challenges to Apple’s ATT update, and indeed Google’s own plans, with publishers claiming that the shift to phase out external data-tracking is in violation EU law, on antitrust grounds.

The legal technicalities could change the approach from both entirely, and it is interesting to note what limitations Google will or won’t put on itself as a result of this proposed change.

From a user standpoint, Google says that Topics would give people more control over their online experience, as it will be more transparent than cookies.

“And, by providing websites with your topics of interest, online businesses have an option that doesn’t involve covert tracking techniques, like browser fingerprinting, in order to continue serving relevant ads.

It is an interesting proposal, which does appear to cater to both users and publishers, and facilitate ongoing ad targeting in a post-cookie environment. But there are some intricacies that we’ll need to see more detail on before we can assess the full viability of the option.

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But ideally, eventually, the proposal will enable advertisers to continue using more advanced online targeting, as opposed to cutting them off completely, and reducing the effectiveness of digital ads.

You can read more about Google’s new Topics proposal here.



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Twitter Updates Video Playback in the New Version of TweetDeck

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Twitter Updates Video Playback in the New Version of TweetDeck


Twitter has added another element to the preview version of the next stage of TweetDeck, which will now enable users to expand and watch video clips from a TweetDeck column as they continue to use the app.

As you can see in this example, now, when you click to play a video clip, it will stay docked at the bottom of your window if you scroll past, so you can keep watching while you check out the latest tweets in your streams.

You’ll also be able to undock the video playback, pin it to another location or dismiss the video, while the playback will also continue even if you switch decks, or remove the column that it came from entirely.

It’s the latest addition to the growing feature base in the updated TweetDeck, which Twitter first launched last July, and is still in invite-only Preview mode.  Selected users in the US, Canada and Australia can access the new format, though you can also get a sense of the new functions by temporarily gaining access by editing the HTML code on the site.

The updated version of the tweet management platform includes improved column creation, ‘Decks’ for building multiple dashboards in the app, updated tweet presentation, so you can see how your tweets will look before they go live, list discovery, DM management and more.

It’s a better-looking, better functioning version of TweetDeck, and given it’s now been in testing for six months, it seems likely that it will soon become the default version of the platform, available to all users.

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Though Twitter could also look to monetize it.

I mean, Hootsuite has over 200,000 paying users, and how many of them are utilizing its platform just to schedule tweets? If Twitter went the same route, and charged businesses a small fee for access to TweetDeck, along with additional enhanced tools, and ideally, updated tweet analytics, I suspect many would indeed pay, adding another revenue pathway for the company.

And with Twitter still working on subscription models and other revenue generation options, it could be a more viable pathway than, say, Twitter Blue, which hasn’t become a major winner as yet.

To be clear, Twitter has directly suggested that it might look to monetize TweetDeck, as such, though Twitter Product Chief Kayvon Beykpour, did make this comment on the launch of the TweetDeck Preview test last July:

“Through these tests, we’re exploring how we can give people more customization and control using TweetDeck. We want to get feedback on how we can expand TweetDeck’s offerings for those who use it the most. We’ll take these lessons into account as we explore what TweetDeck could look like within Twitter’s subscription offerings later on. We’ll have more to share soon as we learn from these tests.”

So Twitter has, at the least, considered the potential in this respect, and if it is looking to significantly enhance the tool, and add in advanced analytics, especially following the removal of its Audience Insights element from Twitter Analytics in 2020, then again, I would suggest that many brands would indeed pay.

There are valuable tools that Twitter could build in, based on existing third-party tweet analytics options, which could make it worth any extra cost, and brands would be keen to track more data if it becomes available.

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There are no new analytics elements in the TweetDeck Preview as yet, but it does seem like an area of potential as Twitter continues to evolve the tool.





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Twitter Adds New Data Tracking Options to Ad Manager, New Overview of Tag Events

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Twitter Adds New Data Tracking Options to Ad Manager, New Overview of Tag Events


Twitter has announced some new updates to its ad platform which are designed to streamline ad targeting, while also providing more insights on campaign performance.

First off, Twitter’s changing the name of its ‘Website Clicks & Conversions’ objective to ‘Website Traffic’, a more generalized header, which will now also include a new ‘Site Visits Optimization’ goal within your available campaign objectives.

As you can see here, now, when setting up a Website Traffic campaign, you’ll be able to use ‘Site visits’ as the goal, which will then direct Twitter’s system to serve your ads to audiences most likely to visit your website.

“By enabling the Twitter Website Tag, Twitter is able to track actions that audiences take on an advertiser’s website and attribute them to their Twitter ads campaigns.”

That will then enable Twitter’s systems to better determine audience objectives, and present your ads to the right users. Twitter says that it’s seen strong results with site visits in testing, and it’ll be interesting to see whether the new goal generates better direct response to your promoted tweets.

In addition to this, Twitter’s also adding a new aggregated view of site metrics and conversion events within Twitter Ads Manager, which Twitter’s adding as a means to counter data loss as a result of Apple’s ATT update, and more users opting out of in-app tracking.

The process will utilize data gathered via Twitter’s website tag to provide a generalized estimate of key metrics, by Ad Group, at campaign level, by device type (iOS or Android), and placement-level, where possible.

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The data obviously won’t be as accurate as you would get from direct reporting via the Twitter tag on each user response, but by providing some insight into user actions, Twitter will be able to replace a level of indicative insight that’s been lost due to the iOS change.

And finally, Twitter’s adding a new ‘Events Manager’ dashboard to manage your Twitter Website Tag and its associated web-based conversion events.

Twitter ads update

As you can see here, the new Events Manager overview will provide in-depth insight on tag events, enabling you to better track and utilize the data being gathered from your site visitors.

These are handy updates, more focused on advanced Twitter marketers, but facilitating new levels of ad performance insight, which could help to maximize your ad results. And while aggregated data is no replacement for direct attribution, in the wake of Apple’s ATT update, marketers need to work with what they can, and these supplemental insights will help to provide more guidance in your approach.

You can read more about Twitter’s new ad platform updates here.





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