Connect with us

SOCIAL

TikTok Launches ‘Creator Fund’ to Pay Platform Influencer for Their Efforts

Published

on

tiktok launches creator fund to pay platform influencer for their efforts

Amid rising speculation about the future of the app, with authorities in several regions calling for potential restrictions due to its links with the Chinese Government, TikTok is looking to deepen its economic roots, in order to make it harder to justify removing it from circulation.

Earlier this week, TikTok announced that it plans to hire 10,000 staff in the U.S. over the next three years, as it looks to maximize its growth opportunities. And today, TikTok has unveiled a new TikTok Creator Fund, which will pay prominent creators for their videos on the platform.

TikTok Creator Fund

As per TikTok:

“To further support our creators, we’re launching the TikTok Creator Fund to encourage those who dream of using their voices and creativity to spark inspirational careers. The US fund will start with $200 million to help support ambitious creators who are seeking opportunities to foster a livelihood through their innovative content. The fund will be distributed over the coming year and is expected to grow over that time.”

The program could help TikTok on two fronts – for one, monetizing short-form video is difficult.

Vine found this out hard way – after establishing itself as a key cultural reference point, and building a significant audience, Vine eventually collapsed because it wasn’t able to monetize effectively. With Vine’s main content offering being only six-seconds in length, that made it increasingly difficult for Vine to implement ads, as users would either skip by them or ignore them in-stream. And that made it impossible for Vine to adequately compensate its top creators. 

Vine did try to counter this, adding longer-form videos and pre-roll ads in its dying months, but with greater revenue opportunities elsewhere, Vine’s top creators gradually migrated away, taking their audiences with them. Many of them went on to become millionaires via YouTube and Facebook, while Vine was shut down, as usage continually declined.

That’s why Vine creator Dom Hoffman was so adamant that creators on his new short-form video app, Byte, get paid from the outset, even if that means dipping into its own funding to make it happen. 

Now TikTok is following a similar playbook. As TikTok creators build their followings, the lure of monetization on other platforms will become harder to ignore, and TikTok will be hoping that by ensuring they get paid, even without a comparable ad network, it can keep them around through this allocated funding.

That could keep more creators posting more often, which keeps the audience engaged, which builds the platform, etc.

It doesn’t seem like a sustainable system, long-term, but with the economic impacts of COVID-19 looming, it could well be a key element in further solidifying TikTok’s place in the broader digital eco-system. Which brings us to the next key point.

As noted, TikTok has already announced that it’s willing to create local jobs if the US lets it remain in operation, and with this initiative, it will further embed itself into the American economic landscape by additionally becoming a payment stream for many creators. At a time when jobs are getting harder to come by, the US Government will need to find ways to ensure more people are getting paid. Can they really block TikTok when it could be a provider of so many opportunities?

That seems like a fairly clever play from TikTok – by becoming a bigger provider for more Americans, it will be able to put more pressure on US regulators to reconsider any moves to ban the app, if indeed the talks end up getting that far. US President Donald Trump has said that he’s considering banning TikTok as part of China’s punishment for the COVID-19 outbreak – but if doing so would also see the reduction of 10k jobs, as well as impacting many creators, that decision becomes more strategic than symbolic.

It’s certainly an interesting initiative, on both fronts, and while TikTok creators will be happy to have more opportunities to make money from their efforts, it’ll no doubt lead to additional scrutiny from US regulators. 

TikTok’s Creator Fund will open to applications from US creators beginning in August. Eligible creators need to be 18 years or older, meet a baseline for followers, and “consistently post original content in line with our Community Guidelines

Socialmediatoday.com

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

SOCIAL

Florida lawmakers push to ban social media for children under 16

Published

on

Vietnam plans to ask all social media users on platforms such as Facebook and YouTube to verify their identities

Social media. — © AFP/File Olivier DOULIERY

Florida moved Thursday towards enacting what would be one of the strictest bans on children’s use of social media in the United States after the state Senate passed a bill to keep those under 16 off such platforms.

The controversial bill seeks to protect children’s mental health against the “addictive features” of such platforms, amid fears over online dangers including from sexual predators, cyber bullying and teen suicide.

The legislation, which was approved 23-14, will now go back to the state House. It has already passed there, with the House speaker championing the legislation, but changes made in the Senate need to be approved in the lower chamber.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has expressed concerns over whether banning social media for children under the age of 16 violates parents’ rights – Copyright AFP Philip FONG

It would then have to be signed by Republican Governor Ron DeSantis, who has expressed skepticism about the legislation. Similar efforts by other states have previously been blocked by courts.

“We’re talking about businesses that are using addictive features to engage in mass manipulation of our children to cause them harm,” the bill’s sponsor, Republican Erin Grall, told the Florida Senate on Thursday.

But DeSantis, who has previously said he is sympathetic to fears over the impact of social media on children, voiced concerns about parental rights.

“A parent has the right to opt in,” he told a press conference Thursday.

The governor has argued many times that parents should have more control over decisions affecting their children, particularly in education.

Under DeSantis Florida has passed laws to curtail teaching about sex education and gender identity in schools and to eradicate diversity programs in state-funded universities.

Scores of books have been removed from the state’s school library shelves in recent months, deemed inappropriate for children by conservative parents and school boards.

Some critics say such a law targeting social media use would violate the First Amendment of the US Constitution, which guarantees freedom of speech.

Last year a federal judge blocked an Arkansas initiative that sought to require parental consent to open a social media account.

Most social media networks already have a minimum age of 13 to open an account, though they do little to ensure compliance with the provision.

If the regulation is approved, the platforms will have to block children under the age of 16 from creating accounts and close those already opened.

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

SOCIAL

Solar Flares Or Sabotage? Internet Theories On Today’s Massive Cell Phone Outage

Published

on

Solar Flares Or Sabotage? Internet Theories On Today's Massive Cell Phone Outage

Storyboard

Massive cell phone outages across America are being reported today by customers of AT&T, Cricket Wireless, Verizon, T-Mobile, Consumer Cellular, Boost Mobile, US Cellular, and Straight Talk Wireless, according to data from Downdetector, an online platform that monitors connectivity. That story and more news you need to read today, inside.

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

SOCIAL

Meta Expands Access to Instagram’s Creator Marketplace

Published

on

Meta Expands Access to Instagram’s Creator Marketplace

Meta has announced that it’s finally expanding access to its Creator Marketplace tool, which will give more businesses the capacity to search for creators to work with on their Instagram campaigns.

Meta first launched its Creator Marketplace back in 2022, enabling U.S.-based brands to search and connect with relevant platform influencers based on a range of qualifiers, including focus topics, follower counts, location, etc.

And now, businesses in the following regions will also be able to access the tool:

  • Canada
  • Australia
  • New Zealand
  • United Kingdom
  • Japan
  • India
  • Brazil

In addition to this, Meta also says that Chinese export brands will also be invited to connect with onboarded creators in countries outside of China.

Which is interesting, considering Meta’s tenuous history with the CCP’s “Great Firewall”, but the deal here relates to Chinese businesses operating in regions outside of their homeland, which is somewhat separate to Meta’s internal dealings.

In addition to expanding access, Meta’s also rolling new machine learning-based recommendations within Creator Marketplace, which will use Instagram data to help brands more easily discover creators who are the best fit for their campaigns.

Instagram Creator Marketplace

As you can see in this example, the new recommendations will highlight accounts that have strong engagement rates in your niche, have mentioned your brand in the past, or have produced good results for similar businesses.

That could make it easier to find the right fit, or at the least, to give you more options to consider in your process.

Branded Content collaborations can be highly effective on IG, by using the established expertise and experience of creators who have already built a following in the app, and know what works, to boost your promotions.

By working with the right creators, with connection to your target audience, you can secure valuable endorsement within key communities, which can help to germinate your branding in the right communities.

Brands can check out Instagram’s creator marketplace in Meta Business Suite, with access coming to these new regions shortly.



Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

Trending

Follow by Email
RSS