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Google Again Says No EAT Score But It’s Indirectly In The Search Ranking Algorithm

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Google Again Says No EAT Score But It's Indirectly In The Search Ranking Algorithm

It has been some time since I covered the topic of E-A-T (expertise, authoritativeness and trustworthiness) here. But John Mueller of Google was asked this on Friday at the 10:30 mark. John said that while there is no E-A-T score that Google uses, E-A-T is important and is in the search ranking algorithm in an indirect way.

John said “assume that there is some indirect kind of work done to try to to do similar things, yes” when asked if E-A-T, specific to expertise and authoritativeness, is in the “real algorithms.” John continued to explain that if Google spends the time to put it in the search quality raters guidelines then “we think that it’s something important and then you can “assume that folks on the quality search quality side” who work on the ranking algorithms will work with it in some way.

John however reiterated that “I wouldn’t see like there’s like an EAT score,” something we covered before. It is not like a score “you have to get five or something like that on it,” he explained. “It’s more kind of like trying to understand the context of the content on the web and that’s very i don’t know fuzzy area,” he added.

Just some history, Google said before in 2020 Google does not explicitly measure EAT, in 2019, Google said they don’t have an EAT score. In early 2020, Google said it’s systems don’t look for EAT but later in 2020, Google said it hopes its system does align with EAT. Google however has been adding mentions of E-A-T to its search help docs.

Here is the video embed:

Here is the transcript:

Question: I have some questions about EAT. In quality raters guidelines the authors, expertise are important so do you think it’s also important for a real algorithm? I mean EAT is just mentioned in quality of raters guidelines but I want to know if real algorithms also care about EAT factors like authors, experts?

Answer: I would assume that there is some indirect kind of work done to try to to do similar things, yes. I mean we put this in the guidelines so that we can kind of guide the quality testers to to double check these things and if we think that it’s something important then I would assume that folks on the quality search quality side also work to try to understand that in a more algorithmic way. But I wouldn’t see like there’s like an EAT score and you have to get five or something like that on it.It’s more kind of like trying to understand the context of the content on the web and that’s very i don’t know fuzzy area.

Glenn Gabe’s summary on Twitter:

Forum discussion at Twitter.




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Google Hanukkah Decorations Are Live For 2023

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Google Hanukkah 2023

Hanukkah (aka Chanukah) starts this coming Thursday night, December 7th. Google has added its Hanukkah decorations to the Google Search results interface to celebrate. Google does this every year and I expect to see the same rollout in the coming weeks for Christmas and Kawanzaa but for now, since Chanukah is in the coming days, we have the Hanukkah decorations live at Google Search.

Here is a screenshot of the Chanukah decorations as they look like on the mobile search results.

Google Hanukkah Decorations 2023

You can see it yourself by searching on Google for [chanukah], [hanukkah], but not yet [חֲנוּכָּה‎] or other spelling variations yet but it should soon. It looks better on mobile than it does on desktop results.

To see the past, the 2023 decorations, 2021 decorations, 2020 Chanukah decorations, 2019 Google holiday decorations, the 2018, 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010 and so on.

Happy Chanukah, everyone!

Forum discussion at X.

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Google Pay Accepted Icons In Google Search Results

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Woman Checking Out Store Google Logo

Google seems to be testing a Google Pay Accepted label or icon in the Google search results. This label has the super G logo followed by the words “Pay accepted” words next to search result snippets that support Google Pay and notate such in their structured data.

This was first spotted by Khushal Bherwani who shared some screenshots of this on X – here is one:

G Pay Accepted Google Search

Here are some more screenshots:

Brodie Clark also posted some screenshots after on X:

Google Pay Accepted Google Search

I tried to replicate this but I came up short.

This is not the first time Google had similar icons like this in its search results.

Forum discussion at X.



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Google Discover Showing Older Content Since Follow Feature Arrived

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Dog Astronut Google Logo

Typically, Google Discover shows content that is less than a day old, but it can show content that is weeks, months, or even years old. However, typically, Google will show more recent content in the Discover feed. Well, that may have changed with the new Google follow feature.

Glenn Gabe, who is a very active Google Discover user, noticed that since the Follow feature rolled out, he has been seeing content that is weeks and months old way more often than before the follow feature rolled out. Glenn wrote on X that “this could also be playing a role. i.e. Google isn’t providing as much recent content, but instead, focusing on providing targeted content based on the topics you are following.”

It makes sense that if you follow a specific topic and if Google Discover only shows the most authoritative types of content, it might be hard for Google to find new content on that topic. So it does make sense that Google may show older content more often for that specific topic you follow.

Here are screenshots Glenn shared:

Google Discover Old Stories Follow

Google Discover Old Stories Follow2

Have you noticed this in your Discover feed?

Forum discussion at X.



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