Connect with us
Cloak And Track Your Affiliate Links With Our User-Friendly Link Cloaking Tool, Try It Free

AFFILIATE MARKETING

Teens are selling products on TikTok Shop between classes

Published

on

Teens are selling products on TikTok Shop between classes

High schoolers are testing out their social media marketing skills with a new side gig: TikTok Shop. Teens on the app are bringing in millions of views using the new feature, despite the fact that TikTok forbids minors from applying to the program.

NBC News identified six TikTok accounts that have published dozens of TikTok Shop videos over the past two weeks. The creators all identified publicly as under the age of 18. 

In a statement responding to questions about the presence of teens on TikTok Shop, a TikTok representative said, “As TikTok Shop rolls out in the US, we continue to evolve our safeguards and are taking steps to address this issue.” TikTok asks users for their age when signing up for an account, which offers a loophole — kids can pretend to be older.

The findings are the latest demonstration of how users are quickly taking advantage of the relatively new TikTok Shop functionality to make money. The feature, launched in September, has rapidly gained popularity and TikTok has appeared to struggle to moderate how people are using it. It also demonstrates the rapid influence that TikTok Shop’s new system, which encourages the fast production of internet advertising by creators, is having on the internet.

One of the creators, who said on his profile (which had over 33,000 followers) that he was 16, made a TikTok Shop advertisement for $4 women’s leggings that said the wearer “may get pregnant” — a joke about how good the wearer would look in the leggings. In the video, the teen danced to “Billie Jean” (in which Michael Jackson sings, “But the kid is not my son … ”). Another video the same teen made advertising the leggings, in which he imagined a “10/10 baddie” wearing them, has over 1.1 million views. 

In the two weeks since its debut, TikTok Shop has made major waves in the social media advertising scene, with the app becoming a conduit for a new type of commission-based marketing. With TikTok Shop, users can advertise nearly any product available through the app and get a cut of the sale. The company also makes it easy for large and small retailers to sell their goods via the shop.

TikTok Shop videos are served to TikTok users via the same algorithm that determines the “For You” page, which means that videos that quickly get engagement will often be pushed out to even bigger viewership almost instantly. 

This has resulted in a near-endless stream of TikTok Shop videos marketing all kinds of products, including dubious health supplements and too-good-to-be-true gadgets. Some TikTok Shop videos feature clips copied from content like podcasts that the creator uses to advertise an unrelated product. In that case, the creator isn’t affiliated with either the content or the product.

Many of the creators using TikTok Shop are adults, and typically they either make the product they’re advertising, are sponsored by the company whose products they’re advertising, or they order the products to test them before advertising them. 

Some teens appear to have jumped onboard as well, posting videos that look like they’re shot in high schools with backgrounds showing lockers, desks and hallways. Some are even recorded during class.

Some of the TikTok Shop creators don’t appear to be using or buying the products they’re marketing. Some are just putting text over a simple background with a plea to purchase the product, sometimes even making a series of videos with slight differences advertising a product over and over again — dozens or even hundreds of times — trying to get an algorithmic win on at least one video. 

The TikTok Shop feature is not supposed to be used by minors, but the voluntary age submission process has allowed teen users to slip through the cracks. While TikTok requires people selling their own products to provide TikTok with a form of government-issued ID, creators who are just advertising other people’s products don’t have to prove their age.

According to the TikTok Shop Content Policy, “Creators are prohibited from uploading, posting, streaming, or sharing any content that targets minors,” including content trying to persuade minors to buy products or services or content to try to get minors to persuade their parents to buy them products or services.

Much of the merchandise being sold on TikTok Shop comes from China, even though it is being sold by many creators in the U.S.

The same teen made a video advertising a studded $10 belt with the caption: “Imagine your parents this belt just whoop you.” That video has over 1.2 million views. The teen made all three videos in the same day. 

The leggings the teen advertised are from a brand listed on TikTok Shop as Ying Fu Apparel, based in Zhejiang, China. The belt was from a brand called “HeartinBelt” that is also based in Zhejiang. 

Some teens making TikTok Shop videos are actually trying the products that they’re advertising. One girl who said she was 15 made a TikTok Shop video lip-syncing to the song “Creep” by Radiohead. She advertised the Radiohead T-shirt she was wearing in the video, which she wrote was “cute af” and “only costed me like $1.27.” Her video was viewed 2.8 million times. 

The shirt, which currently costs $13.99 to $58.99 on TikTok Shop, is being sold on the platform by an individual based in Missouri whose products include a lot of music merchandise.

TikTok Shop has been compared to Chinese fast-fashion giants like Shein and Temu, but executives at the company have reportedly said they view TikTok Shop more like Amazon.

In some ways, TikTok Shop has emerged as a new concept altogether — not fast-fashion production, but fast-advertising production. It’s a no-holds-barred approach to affiliate marketing, a type of influencer brand marketing popularized by early-to-mid 2000s bloggers.

Affiliate marketing is when a company like Shein contracts an influencer to create content marketing their clothes. Often, that influencer is provided with an “affiliate code,” which shoppers can use like a discount code. Because the influencer is an affiliate, they receive a cut of the proceeds from purchases made with their code. 

TikTok Shop streamlines this concept so that companies don’t need influencer marketing employees and creators don’t need to be influencers. Anyone with at least 5,000 TikTok followers can begin making affiliate content for TikTok Shop — although NBC News spotted accounts with fewer followers making TikTok Shop content, too. 

According to TikTok’s rules, users must be 18 and provide valid tax and banking information to enroll in TikTok Shop.



Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

AFFILIATE MARKETING

Earn $680K a Year with This Wedding Industry Franchise

Published

on

Earn $680K a Year with This Wedding Industry Franchise

3 Benefits of Owning a Wed Society Franchise:

  1. Recession-resistant with a stable market due to consistent demand for wedding services.
  2. Potential for high revenue with low overhead costs and strong unit economics.
  3. Offers flexibility and control with a work-from-home model and virtual customer interactions.

Wed Society is a comprehensive franchise specializing in digital, social, print media, and event planning within the wedding industry. The franchise offers a unique niche market, providing a robust platform for wedding vendors to showcase their services and for couples to plan their weddings. Click Here to connect me with Wed Society.

Key Facts:

  • Minimum Initial Investment: $97,750 – $121,000
  • Initial Franchise Fee: $45,000
  • Liquid Capital Required: $100,000
  • Net Worth Required: $200,000
  • Veteran Incentives: $10,000 off franchise fee

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

AFFILIATE MARKETING

Why Taylor Swift Believes in Her Lucky Number

Published

on

Why Taylor Swift Believes in Her Lucky Number

People reports that Chiefs star Travis Kelce just attended his 13th performance of Taylor Swift‘s The Eras Tour, and the significance of that number is lost on no one.

Swift is a big fan of the number 13 — so much so that before every show she paints a 13 on her hand for good luck. Why are those digits so near and dear to her heart?

Swift was born on December 13, 1989, and explained in an interview with MTV News: “I turned 13 on Friday the 13th. My first album went gold in 13 weeks. My first No. 1 song had a 13-second intro. Every time I’ve won an award I’ve been seated in either the 13th seat, the 13th row, the 13th section or row M, which is the 13th letter. Basically, whenever a 13 comes up in my life, it’s a good thing.”

Swift isn’t the only one who leans into superstitions to give herself an extra boost of confidence. In the book Recipes for Good Luck, author Ellen Weinstein researched the superstitions and rituals of some of the most famous and successful people in modern history. And while some might seem odd or silly to others, Weinstein writes that beliefs, rituals and routines can “help you face the world with ambition and confidence and inspire you to go on making good luck of your own.”

Here are some other superstars who used pre-performance rituals to get ready to go.

  • During his playing days, NBA superstar Michael Jordan wore UNC shorts underneath his Chicago Bulls uniform. They were the same shorts he wore in 1982 when he scored the winning jump shot that brought his college team, the University of North Carolina Tar Heels, their first NCAA championship since 1957.
  • Tennis great Serena Williams has several distinctive pre-performance and on-court rituals: before a match, she’d tie her shoelaces in the exact same way and always bounced the ball five times before her first serve and twice before her second.
  • Before beginning the opening monologue of her former talk show, Ellen DeGeneres would be sure to throw a mint in the air and catch it in her mouth.
  • Rihanna has said that she doesn’t allow anything yellow in her dressing room before a show, believing it is bad luck.
  • Soccer legend David Beckham has a thing against odd numbers. His wife Victoria told The Chicago Sun-Times that their house had several refrigerators, each devoted to different types of food. “In the drinks one, everything is symmetrical,” she explained. “If there’s three cans, he’ll throw one away because it has to be an even number.”

Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

AFFILIATE MARKETING

Barbara Corcoran Says All Good Leaders Have This 1 Quality

Published

on

Barbara Corcoran Says All Good Leaders Have This 1 Quality

Corcoran Group founder and “Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran knows how to run a tight ship — but she also knows when to relinquish control.

The 75-year-old real estate pioneer and entrepreneur took to Instagram on Wednesday to share advice on hiring and delegating.

Related: Barbara Corcoran: All ‘Really Successful Entrepreneurs’ Do This

First, she says, embrace your inner “control freak” — it’s part of the job.

“Anybody who’s a good boss, I’ve learned, is a control freak. It just comes with the territory, and control freaks have a heck of a hard time delegating,” Corcoran explained. “They’re the last people who want to give away what they do so perfectly.”

Corcoran says in order for your business to grow, though, it’s important to find someone who can do the job 80% as well as you can. If you find a candidate who can do that, invest in them to “build your business and move it ahead.”

Corcoran said she goes through a three-question litmus test before hiring someone to create a strong pool of employees.

Related: Barbara Corcoran Issues Statement, Warning on NAR Settlement

“I ask myself, ‘Are they happy? Do they work hard? Are they talented people in one regard or another?’ And if they are, I hire them, and I delegate something to them that’s above their pay grade, above their talent pool, so they have to reach and show me how good they are, and that’s how you develop talent,” she said.

“It’s not just a matter of delegating, it’s a matter of developing talent, and then delegating to the talent,” she added.

Corcoran’s net worth is an estimated $400 million.



Source link

Keep an eye on what we are doing
Be the first to get latest updates and exclusive content straight to your email inbox.
We promise not to spam you. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address
Continue Reading

Trending