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Good morning: Short-term and long-term goals

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Good morning: Short-term and long-term goals


MarTech’s daily brief features daily insights, news, tips, and essential bits of wisdom for today’s digital marketing leader. If you would like to read this before the rest of the internet does, sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox daily.

Good morning, Marketers, and the decision to serve short-term goals and longer term ones isn’t always an either/or.

For instance, you can take action on specific customer service or CX challenges by implementing a conversational tool or by just making sure teams within the org are better aligned. This can drive lifetime value down the road from happier customers. It can also be a source of valuable customer data when you and your tech stack are listening better to customer needs.

And with all the disruption in the third-party data space, through the deprecation of third-party cookies and privacy regulations, brands need that deep knowledge of existing customers even more. What marketers do today can help pave the way forward and navigate unanticipated bumps down the road.

As a business journalist for over 15 years, of course I’m inclined to believe in the benefit of professional development and a steady flow of news to keep marketing leaders at the top of their game. So, another short-term action with potential long-term gains is to attend our upcoming virtual MarTech conference on March 29 and 30 (registration is free) and soak in some insights from other leaders in the field.

Chris Wood,

Editor

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People. Data enablement platform LiveRamp has named Jessica Shapiro as CMO. Shapiro has extensive experience as a marketing executive in both B2B and B2C, not only with SAP Concur and Microsoft, but as director of U.S. marketing at Starbucks. Shapiro will report directly to CEO Scott Howe.


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About The Author

Chris Wood draws on over 15 years of reporting experience as a B2B editor and journalist. At DMN, he served as associate editor, offering original analysis on the evolving marketing tech landscape. He has interviewed leaders in tech and policy, from Canva CEO Melanie Perkins, to former Cisco CEO John Chambers, and Vivek Kundra, appointed by Barack Obama as the country’s first federal CIO. He is especially interested in how new technologies, including voice and blockchain, are disrupting the marketing world as we know it. In 2019, he moderated a panel on “innovation theater” at Fintech Inn, in Vilnius. In addition to his marketing-focused reporting in industry trades like Robotics Trends, Modern Brewery Age and AdNation News, Wood has also written for KIRKUS, and contributes fiction, criticism and poetry to several leading book blogs. He studied English at Fairfield University, and was born in Springfield, Massachusetts. He lives in New York.



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MARKETING

Only 38% of marketers very confident in their customer data and analytics systems

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Only 38% of marketers very confident in their customer data and analytics systems

Only 38% of marketers globally are very confident in their data, analytics and insight systems, according to a new report from The CMO Council. And, while 91% say direct access to customer data is a critical competitive advantage, only 11% say that data is readily accessible to them. 

Read next: Only 11% of CMOs say they have achieved digital transformation goals

North American marketers. Most of these numbers are global ones, but the ones specifically from North American marketers are not good. Only 28% say they are very confident in their data systems to win and retain customers. Compare that with Europe where 61% answered yes to this. Just 6% of North American respondents said they have high access to customer data vs. 20% of Europeans. On the issue of being able to move quickly from data to action, it is 8% from our side of the Atlantic versus 36% from theirs. And Europeans have a lot more faith in their systems: 46% say they’re confident the martech they have can adapt to future needs versus 20% in the U.S. and Canada.

Source: CMO Council’s High Velocity Data Report.
Used with permission.

Barriers to data access. Nearly three-quarters (73%) said not having the right tools prevents them from getting the data they need. The lack of proper data management processes was cited by 60% of respondents. Next up, both with 41%: Data control being elsewhere in the organization and the data not being available in real time.

Can’t get the most from their data. The biggest things preventing marketers from maximizing the data they already have? Some 55% said a lack of systems connecting data silos and making it easy to access. The talent shortage is No. 2 on the list, cited by 52% of respondents. Next on the list at 44% was not having the money to improve data systems.

Why we care. Good data is gold, bad data isn’t just useless – it can lead to very big mistakes in planning, allocation and all the other parts of marketing. So why can’t marketing departments get the data they need? This study implies it’s because they are failing to convince their own organizations about what they need. This is understandable. Convincing a customer is comparatively easy: They aren’t competing with you for resources and to move up the career ladder. So maybe it’s time to put together a campaign around the needs of the marketing department.


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About The Author

Constantine von Hoffman is managing editor of MarTech. A veteran journalist, Con has covered business, finance, marketing and tech for CBSNews.com, Brandweek, CMO, and Inc. He has been city editor of the Boston Herald, news producer at NPR, and has written for Harvard Business Review, Boston Magazine, Sierra, and many other publications. He has also been a professional stand-up comedian, given talks at anime and gaming conventions on everything from My Neighbor Totoro to the history of dice and boardgames, and is author of the magical realist novel John Henry the Revelator. He lives in Boston with his wife, Jennifer, and either too many or too few dogs.

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