Connect with us

MARKETING

The 8 Best Marketing Frameworks You Need to Know

Published

on

The 8 Best Marketing Frameworks You Need to Know


Marketing is a unique animal. With a combination of creativity, analytical thinking, taking data into consideration, and project management, a modern-day marketer must possess a great number of skills and have quite a few tools at their disposal.

Sure, you can delegate some of the work, but it also means you’re responsible for getting multiple people on the same page…some of which work in different states.

Rather than allowing your frustration to build, you can utilize tools that will make your job easier. More specifically, marketing frameworks. In this piece, we’ll discuss what a marketing strategy framework is, the benefits of utilizing one, the best marketing models out there, and how to decide which is best for you.

You can think of it like this: you wouldn’t dream of approaching your marketing with a “throw spaghetti at the wall and see what sticks” attitude because it would be a disaster for your organization.

Instead, you’ll likely spend days, weeks, and maybe even months identifying your target audience, where they spend time and determining the perfect way to reach them and communicate the benefits of your product or service in a marketing plan.

Your marketing strategy framework takes this all a step further and, as mentioned above, ensures your marketing plan is successful because you’ll share content with your audiences at the right time in the most relevant channels that are more likely to drive results.

The Benefits of a Marketing Framework

A Marketing Framework does more than just keep you focused on the task at hand. As your company grows and your team grows along with it, you must find a way to communicate with every member of the marketing department, no matter where they work or what tasks they are responsible for.

Creating a marketing framework is the best way to ensure that everyone knows what they need to do and how they need to do it. Additional benefits of utilizing a marketing framework include:

  • Creating a home for templates, guides, tools, and assets that all marketers in your organization will need to access.
  • Establishing and communicating approved verbiage for the organization.
  • Improving marketing which then improves the growth and bottom line of the company.
  • Allows the team to compare different strategies and determine the best route.
  • Clearly communicate who is responsible for what and make it easier to transfer people from one role to another.
  • Save time by limiting “redos” – areas that are often susceptible to errors and therefore must be reworked.

In addition, your framework will help you predict your customer’s behavior and the revenue you can expect to see. As a result, it will help your team function more efficiently and produce more effectively.

The Best Marketing Frameworks

Marketing has probably been around since prehistoric days when entrepreneurial cavemen designed state-of-the-art spears and tried to sell them to their less “handy” counterparts.

See also  Digital Marketing Trends to Look For in 2022

Okay, that might not be true, but marketing has been a necessary aspect of business for a long time, and, over that time, savvy marketers have designed models and frameworks to make their (and your) job easier. Let’s take a look at some traditional models as well as some newer frameworks.

Traditional Marketing Models

1. 7Ps Marketing Mix

This widely used model considers the stages of business strategy, beginning at conception and taking it to evaluation. The Ps stand for:

  • Product: What’s being sold?
  • Prince: How much does it cost?
  • Place: Where will the product be sold?
  • Promotion: How will you communicate with your audience?
  • People: Who is involved in the production, promotion, and distribution?
  • Process: How will you deliver it to the customer?
  • Physical Evidence: How will you prove to customers that your business exists?

When you utilize the 7P model, you’ll have the opportunity to analyze and optimize every aspect of your company and your strategy to improve your business.

marketing strategy framework: The-7Ps-Marketing-Mix

Image Source

2. STP Marketing Model

The SPT model is a top-down approach that focuses on how a company addresses customers and helps deliver personalized (and relevant) messages to audiences.

STP stands for segmentation (dividing your audience into different sections), targeting (who will be the most receptive to your product), and positioning (how do you make your product the most appealing to that audience), and has helped many companies shift to utilizing social media to deliver content.

marketing strategy framework: stp approach

Image Source

3. Porter’s Five Forces

While most marketing frameworks focus on the product itself and the audience, Porter’s Five Forces looks at the outside influences that can affect profitability. These include:

  • Supplier Power, how many other suppliers exist, what makes them different, and how much their product costs.
  • Buyer Power, which is the customer’s ability to influence decisions made by the company.
  • Threat of Substitution, which is how your product compares to others on the market.
  • Threat of New Entry, which is any barriers you might experience when entering the market.
  • Competitive Rivalry, which is any other outside forces that affect how your product compares to the competition.

This model will help determine just how competitive your business environment is.

marketing strategy framework: porters five forces

Image Source

Now, let’s look at some of the newer models to hit the marketing scene. While they may not have been around as long as the more traditional models, they take into account the current marketing climate and often focus on start-ups.

Modern Marketing Models

4. Pirate Metrics or “AARRR!”

No, you don’t have to don an eye patch or adopt a parrot to use this framework. Developed by serial Startup Founder Dave McClure, Pirate Metrics allows you to see how a customer may travel on their buying journey and what areas you need to improve. AARRR stands for:

  • Acquisition: Where are prospects finding you? Facebook ads, blog content, a paid search, etc.
  • Activation: What step did a prospect take once they arrived at your website? Depending on the business, this could include signing up for an account, downloading a free giveaway in exchange for their email, filling out a profile, etc.
  • Retention: Once they’ve left your site, do prospects or customers come back? How often?
  • Revenue: How do you earn money from your customers? Consider reviewing metrics such as conversion rates, shopping cart size, and the LTV or customer lifetime value.
  • Referral: When customers are happy, they tell other people, and you end up with more customers. This lowers your CAC or customer acquisition cost because your loyal customers will attract new prospects for you.
See also  An Introduction to Pay-Per-Click (PPC) Paid Marketing

marketing strategy framework: aarrr framework

Image Source

5. Lean Analytics Stages

Developed by Alistair Croll and Ben Yoskovitz, the Lean Analytics Stage framework combines aspects of many different models and is ideal for improving startup growth. There are five pillars to this model:

1. Empathy

During the product development stage, you’ll spend most of your time listening to customers, empathizing with their challenges, and taking in as much feedback as they are willing to provide. Once you have identified a problem you can solve to create your minimum viable product (MVP), you can then move on to the next stage.

2. Stickiness

Focus on engagement and retention as you work to create something that yields return customers. When you’ve got an engaged base and a low attrition rate, you can continue to stage three.

3. Virality

Before you try to attract customers through heavy advertising spending, focus on your existing customers. As your organic growth rates improve, you can move to stage four.

4. Revenue

Without money, you’ll be out of business quickly. Pay attention to your customer acquisition cost metrics to make sure your customers spend more money than they cost to acquire. Once you’ve reached your revenue goals, you can move to the final stage.

5. Scale

You’ve got explicit knowledge of your product and your market. Now, it’s time to increase the revenue from your current market and potentially enter into new markets.

marketing strategy framework: lean analytics modelImage Source

6. The Hook Model

No, it has nothing to do with the Pirate Metrics we discussed earlier, but it does compliment the stickiness and virality we discussed during Lean Analytics.

The Hook Model was developed by Nir Eyal, author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. He believes that our most purchased and utilized products achieve that status because they become a part of habitual behaviors. As marketers, we can tap into that by understanding the cycle:

  • Trigger: The beginning of the cycle is often an external trigger like a push notification. However, as the cycle continues, negative internal emotions become triggers as we attempt to lessen these negative emotions with an action.
  • Action: The easier you make things to do, the more likely a person will do it. Habit-forming products make taking action painless and straightforward.
  • Variable Reward: The anticipation of reward is a strong motivator. Variability increases anticipation, making prospects and customers more likely to take an action that warrants a reward.
  • Investment: Creating an investment or “buy-in” for your customers makes it more difficult for them to step away from your product or service.

marketing strategy framework: the hook model

Image Source

7. The ICE Score

Sean Ellis, the Father of Growth Marketing, teaches the ICE score, a simple and quick way to evaluate potential channels for growth.

See also  What Marketers Need to Understand About Automated Bid Algorithms

Rather than implementing a complex system, Ellis suggests asking three questions:

1. What will the impact of this move be if it works?
2. How confident am I that this plan will work?
3. How much time, money, and effort will be necessary to put this into action?

Asking yourself and your team these questions is one of the fastest ways to evaluate an idea and determine if you should move forward.

8. STEPPS

Developed by Jonah Burger, the author of Contagious: Why Things Catch On, STEPPS is a formula to create contagious content that has people talking and sharing.

  • Social Currency: Invite your customers to feel more like insiders. Humans are programmed to care what others think of them. This taps into that need to be seen positively by others and encourages conversation around your product.
  • Triggers: Frequently remind people of your product utilizing triggers and they’ll talk about it more.
  • Emotion: Highly emotional content is more likely to go viral. Taking that one step further, high arousal emotions like anger will be shared more often than low arousal emotions like sadness.
  • Public: When you make something public, you encourage people to talk about it and share it.
  • Practical Value: Provide value in the form of useful content, and people will be more likely to share it.
  • Stories: We are biologically wired to see the world through narrative. Creative stories that are easy to relate to and easy to remember, and they’ll also be easy to share.

marketing strategy framework: stepps modelImage Source

Selecting the Best Marketing Framework for Your Business

While there are a variety of models available to you, they are not all created equal. There are a number of factors that will influence which framework is best for you and your organization.

In order to determine which framework to choose, you’ll want to examine the following aspects of your business:

  • What are the top priorities of the business?
  • What is the role of marketing within the organization?
  • How is success defined and measured within the marketing?
  • What is the marketing department capable of, and what improvements would you like to make?
  • Where would you like to see the most impact due to marketing efforts and what’s the easiest way to ensure that impact?

Over To You

Marketing is a difficult role no matter your product or service. You are in essence responsible for telling the world that your company has the cure to what ails them. Without you, the most amazing product or service ever created will never reach the hands of the people who need it.

As challenging as it is, there are tools you can utilize to take some of the difficulty out of your responsibilities. A marketing framework will help you stay the course, keep your team in the know and on the right path, and will ultimately help you better achieve your desired goals. Create a marketing framework today and make tomorrow easier.

New Call-to-action



Source link

MARKETING

FLoC is off the table as Google switches to targeting by Topics

Published

on

FLoC is off the table as Google switches to targeting by Topics


Google will replace Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) with a new interest-based targeting proposal called Topics, the company announced Tuesday.

The Topics API will share a limited number of topics of interest, based on the user’s recent browsing browsing history, with participating sites without involving external servers. Users will be able to review topics assigned to their profile and remove them. There are no plans at this stage to allow them to add topics. Google says it will have a process in place to exclude potentially sensitive topics like race and sexual orientation. The final iteration of the user controls, as well as other technical aspects of how Topics works, will be determined based on the trial and feedback, Google said.

We reported in the Daily Brief last August that this change was being contemplated.

Google had no news to announce with respect to its Privacy Sandbox Timeline for deprecating third-party cookies, although it conceded it might change depending on trials and feedback.

How it will work. “With Topics, your browser determines a handful of topics, like ‘Fitness’ or ‘Travel,’ that represent your top interests for that week based on your browsing history,” Google said in the announcement.

Up to five topics are associated with the browser. Topics are stored for three weeks and the processing occurs on the device, without involving any external servers, including Google’s own servers.

Google is starting this initiative with about 300 topics “that represent an intersection of IAB’s Content Taxonomy V2 and also our own advertising taxonomy review,” said Ben Galbraith, Chrome product director, “This is a starting point; we could see this getting into the low thousands or staying in the hundreds [of topics].” 

See also  13 Inexpensive Small-Business Marketing Ideas That Actually Work

When a user goes to a participating website, the Topics API selects three topics (one from each of the past three weeks) to share with that site and its advertising partners. If a site does not participate in the Topics API, “Then it doesn’t provide a topic nor does it receive a topic,” Galbraith said. The site itself or its advertising partners can opt in to the Topics API.

Google has also published a technical explainer containing more details about the Topics proposal.

The difference between FLoC and Topics. One of the main distinctions between Google’s previous targeting proposal, FLoC, and the Topics API is that Topics does not group users into cohorts. As the Electronic Frontier Foundation has pointed out, fingerprinting techniques could be used to distinguish a user’s browser from the thousands of other users within the same cohort to establish a unique identifier for that browser.

Additionally, under FLoC, the browser gathers data about a user’s browsing habits in order to assign that user to a cohort, with new cohorts assigned on a weekly basis, based on their previous week’s browsing data. The Topics API determines topics to associate with the user on a weekly basis according to their browsing history, but those topics are kept for three weeks. They are shared with participating sites and advertisers rather than a FLoC cohort ID.

The difference between contextual advertising and Topics. Galbraith confirmed that, unlike traditional contextual advertising, users can be targeted by topic even on sites that have nothing to do with the topic. In other words, someone that had showed interest in camping equipment in the previous three weeks might be targeted with ads for tents on a sports website.

See also  Digital Marketing Trends to Look For in 2022

“Time will tell” which browsers will adopt. Google is in the early phases of implementing the Topics API, so other browsers likely won’t have had a chance to evaluate it. But, Chrome was the only browser to adopt its predecessor (FLoC), so it’s unlikely that Firefox, Safari, Edge or other browsers will adopt Google’s proposal this time either.

“We’re sharing the explainer, which is the beginning of that process to discuss with other browsers their view on the Topics API, so time will tell,” Galbraith said.

Why we care. Google is currently set to deprecate third-party cookies in Chrome sometime next year and now we have a better idea of what audience targeting options will be available. Although FLoC is now officially off the table, the remarketing solution FLEDGE is still under consideration.

Prior to the Topics API, Google ran into a number of challenges with FLoC, including lack of adoption, industry pushback and regulatory issues. The company has likely addressed some of those challenges with this new proposal, but adoption among other browsers remains unlikely, which could impact how big of a user base advertisers are able to get in front of.

Galbraith declined to make explicit comment on the alternative identifiers being developed within the adtech industry, only saying that Google believes that the days of tracking consumers are over.

Additional reporting by Kim Davis.


About The Author

George Nguyen is an editor at Third Door Media, primarily covering organic and paid search, podcasting and e-commerce. His background is in journalism and content marketing. Prior to entering the industry, he worked as a radio personality, writer, podcast host and public school teacher.

See also  What Marketers Need to Understand About Automated Bid Algorithms



Source link

Continue Reading

MARKETING

What is CRM? A Guide for Marketers

Published

on

What is CRM? A Guide for Marketers


Customer relationship management (CRM) is the technology brands use to nurture relationships with their customers. These solutions are designed to help sales and service agents communicate with customers more effectively. And because 91% of businesses with more than 11 employees use a CRM, marketers would be wise to learn about all they have to offer.

In this piece, we’ll dive deep into CRM systems and their impact on marketing teams. We’ll cover:

Estimated reading time: 11 minutes

The benefits of CRM

At their core, CRM systems are designed to facilitate customer and sales relationships. From the most basic solutions to the most complex, CRM software stores, organizes and shares customer information to facilitate connections. They collect basic information such as customer websites, emails, phone numbers, purchase dates, social media data and much more. Some even record data in the form of lead scoring based on internal analysis systems.

CRM platforms track user activity across many online channels and seek to guide them through your sales funnel. In essence, they work to paint a picture of the customer to better understand them and, ultimately, fulfill their needs. This approach saves brand resources by focusing on potentially profitable actions, rather than adopting a hit-or-miss approach and hoping customers “bite.”

Organizations of all sizes can take advantage of CRM’s wide range of benefits, including:

  • Improved information organization.
  • Automated data entry.
  • Customer segmentation.
  • Process scaling.
  • Prospect follow-up reminders.
  • Improved reporting.

“Corporations invest in sophisticated CRM, or customer relationship management, programs to effectively oversee their relationship with their customers at every point during the buying process,” says Marc Ostrofsky, entrepreneur and bestselling author of “Get Rich Click.”

CRM platforms can save brands time and resources, yet their ability to enhance customer relationships is their greatest asset. Trust is a bigger success factor than ever in our transformed digital landscape, and brands that fail to keep their customers happy from the get-go will most likely lose out. A CRM system can help organizations combat this challenge by speeding up communication, offering insights to help anticipate needs, and orchestrating marketing activities to deliver relevant information to enhance customer journeys.

Types of CRM systems available

CRM systems are often confused with customer data platforms (CDPs) because they both store customer data, but the two are designed to meet different challenges. CDPs bring together customer data from various sources and unify it, creating shareable profiles in the process, while CRM software enhances the communication and brand relationship with customers, leveraging their data to craft more engaging communications.

At their core, CRM tools offer solutions to help support sales and service agents with customer communications. Unlike CDPs, CRM systems use their technologies to ensure each step of the customer’s experience is as frictionless as possible.

There are a variety of CRM formats available — cloud-based, on-premise, industry-specific, etc. — but there are three main function groups most solutions fall into. Each of these reflects a specific business function designed to address brands’ customer relationship needs.

Operational CRM. The main purpose of operational CRM systems is to help sales, marketing, and service teams better streamline customer interactions. These use various forms of automation to help provide customers with the best experiences. Salesforce and HubSpot are some of the most popular operational CRM tools.

Analytical CRM. Many CRM systems are designed to store vast amounts of data, but not all are effective when it comes to categorizing and drawing insights from it. Analytical CRM software can help marketers determine customer preferences and points of contact more easily through data warehousing, data mining and online analytical processing (OLAP). Zoho Analytics is a good example of an analytical CRM.

Collaborative CRM. Clear communication is key when it comes to sharing customer data across sales, marketing, and customer service departments, which is where collaborative CRM systems thrive. These use interaction and channel management features to give relevant teams a 360-view of customers. Microsoft Dynamics 365 and SAP Customer 360 are popular collaborative CRM systems.

See also  SEO and PPC - making the correct choice

Who uses CRM systems?

CRM software can be a valuable asset to all departments within your organization, which is why many brands have some form of it. 65% of salespeople used CRM tools in 2020, and it’s growing at a rapid pace — spending on CRM is expected to reach $96.5 billion by 2028, according to Grand View Research, Inc.

Enterprises and small businesses alike have found CRM software helpful in their lead management processes. But companies with the following qualities tend to get the most use out of them:

  • Businesses with sales teams.
  • Businesses with dedicated marketing teams.
  • Businesses with accounting teams.
  • Business with human resource departments.

There are also certain industries that use CRM systems more than others due to their innate compatibility.

Retail and e-commerce. While building relationships with customers is important to any enterprise, a CRM’s ability to encourage customer feedback makes it an important piece of retail marketing. It can also help them set goals and provide the product updates customers need.

Banking and financial services. With so much sensitive information involved in finances, brands need tools that can safely handle customer data. CRMs can offer banks and financial institutions custom solutions to ensure their customers’ finances are secure throughout each stage of the process.

Healthcare providers. CRM systems’ ability to synchronize and share vital health information makes them key assets for hospitals, doctors and other healthcare providers. They also assist in the process of gathering patient insights and providing better healthcare experiences.

Hotels and hospitality. The prioritization of customer service in hotels and hospitality is among the highest across industries. To keep up with the demand for good experiences, these organizations use CRM systems to improve communication with customers, ensuring satisfaction levels remain high.

Agriculture. CRM systems help agricultural workers build better relationships with suppliers, which in turn improves the purchasing process. They can also assist with logistics and transportation of equipment.

Consulting. Consulting practices rely heavily on operations, which can experience functionality issues over time. CRM systems help these companies establish consistent processes, all the while helping them keep up with increasing quantities of client work.

Insurance. Companies in the insurance sector often use CRM software to securely store customer information from multiple sources, essentially creating a comprehensive database that customers can access with ease.

It doesn’t matter what industry you’re in — CRM systems have the potential to improve interactions with customers and within your organization as a whole. At their core, they bring together people, technology and processes.


More B2B marketers are adopting account-based marketing than ever before. Find out why and explore the ABM platforms making it possible in the latest edition of this MarTech Intelligence Report.

Click here to download!


How to choose a CRM system

CRM software is designed to help growing companies manage their leads by storing the data in one accessible location. There’s no “wrong” time to adopt one (unless it conflicts with specific organizational requirements such as cost).

Many organizations forgo CRM adoption in favor of traditional customer data storage, relying on salespeople to handle the whole process or using a basic data warehouse. This can work for smaller companies such as startups, which would rather invest in other business aspects. But, at some point, these manual systems will likely fail, putting even greater strain on these companies.

Hesitancy for CRM adoption is understandable given the ever-changing marketing landscape. It’s often the case that brands can’t find adequate amounts of time to evaluate an entirely new system, much less train team members to use it.

See also  An Introduction to Pay-Per-Click (PPC) Paid Marketing

But there are plenty of advantages that brands should consider before brushing off the idea. If teams are aligned throughout the CRM selection, implementation and optimization tasks, there’s less chance for major disruptions.

Brands dealing with large quantities of sales data coming from multiple sources may opt for a CRM to consolidate the information. Sales analysis is vital to successful customer acquisition, and without consistent processes, teams will find it more different to make decisions, leading to poorer outcomes and wasted resources.

Brands may have too few staff members available to handle the needs of a growing customer base. Companies in these situations may find CRMs helpful in their ability to organize, manage and connect with these customers.

In the end, your brand and customer needs are the determining factors for CRM adoption. If companies are having trouble connecting sales and marketing with their customers in engaging and sustaining ways, it could be time to streamline their efforts with a CRM.

How a CRM platform helps sales and marketing teams collaborate effectively

Many organizations are set up like silos with windows – each department performs its own tasks, isolated, with limited visibility into the other divisions. And in a world where more organizations are working virtually, this trend has only been exacerbated.

The advent of tools like Zoom, Slack, Microsoft Teams and the like has streamlined communications within teams to address this siloing. But brands need solutions that unify these departments and allow them to address customer needs seamlessly. This is where CRM comes into play.

A CRM platform can provide these teams with records and notes of conversations and interactions between departments and with customers, making it easier to sustain long-term relationships. The added transparency of these tools provides the foundation for much-needed trust between each group involved.

Many CRM tools even allow departments to work simultaneously on customer files, further preventing any discrepancies in the data. The increasingly popular cloud-based CRM solutions make this possible.

Historically, sales and marketing teams have had difficulties working together to drive the best outcomes. With a CRM, these departments can align their processes, collaborate effectively and, in turn, drive more sales.

How CRM enables personalization & personalized experiences

Customers want to feel cared for by brands, and brands show this most clearly through personalized experiences. But this is more easily said than done. Research from Forrester Consulting found that only one out of five marketing organizations was effectively personalizing content at scale. And another study from Gartner found that 63% struggle to deliver personalized experiences with digital technology.

To infuse their campaigns with the personalization consumers demand, more sales and marketing departments are turning to CRM solutions. These platforms can aggregate massive amounts of customer information, including prior conversations, preferences, questions, concerns or any other data they’ve consented to share. Brands, using a CRM, can leverage the insights gained to craft personalized customer experiences.

“Every contact we have with a customer influences whether or not they’ll come back. We have to be great every time or we’ll lose them,” says Kevin Stirtz, author of “More Loyal Customers.” Companies can ensure they don’t lose touch with customers through CRM software’s relationship-building capabilities, providing salespeople with the most pertinent customer information.

CRM platforms can also help marketing and sales teams predict the next best action for clients. After gaining a more complete understanding of customers, they can more easily guide them to personalized resources on your properties. This helps prove your value as a brand and build customer trust and loyalty.

These personalization capabilities allow CRMs to work effectively with email, social media and website communication; they support over 70% of account-based marketing (ABM) programs, according to the 2020 ABM Benchmark Survey Report.

ABM technology investment chart from survey data

A one-size-fits-all approach to customer relationships will inevitably fail. Brands need solutions like CRM platforms to communicate effectively with their customers, address their concerns in a timely manner and prove that they value their business.

See also  Top 4 Reasons Hanapin Loves YouTube Ads for SaaS Companies

How CRM software can help brands

While CRM software is far from being an all-in-one solution, its capabilities can offer brands much-needed support for their sales, marketing and customer relationship teams. Its ability to automate simple yet mundane tasks free up team members’ time so they can focus on their primary work.

This is perhaps why so many marketers replaced their CRM systems in 2021, opting for new versions to meet their needs.

Businesses that have succeeded with CRM platforms tend to point to the following benefits:

  • Centralized customer data.
  • Improved task tracking.
  • Increased customer retention rates.
  • Automated tasks.
  • Increased sales opportunities.

However, brands shouldn’t expect automatic success with CRM software, especially if their organizational structure isn’t primed to handle it. More marketers are finding issues with many brands’ overreliance on CRM in their B2B stacks, which is why many organizations are demanding more flexible solutions — especially in a post-COVID world. But more than that, brands need to learn how to use whatever CRM system they choose effectively.

“Implementing a CRM system will do absolutely nothing for your business,” says CRM consultant Bobby Darnell. “However, the continued and effective use of it will.”

Building strong relationships between brands and customers is needed now more than ever, and the CRM systems of today seem ready to tackle the challenge. The societal upheaval brought on by the 2020 pandemic left many brands struggling to connect with audiences as they once had, which is most likely why the CRM market grew 10.9% that year and is expected to grow to $128.97 billion by 2028.

The solutions offered by these systems have the potential to help brands effectively connect with customers no matter where they enter the sales cycle. To attract and retain them, marketing and sales teams should consider exploring the capabilities of a CRM.


Snapshot: Marketing automation

For today’s marketers, automation platforms are often the center of the marketing stack. They aren’t shiny new technologies, but rather dependable stalwarts that marketers can rely upon to help them stand out in a crowded inbox and on the web amidst a deluge of content.

HubSpot noted late last year that marketing email volume had increased by as much as 52% compared to pre-COVID levels. And, thankfully, response rates have also risen to between 10% and 20% over their benchmark.

To help marketers win the attention battle, marketing automation vendors have expanded from dependence on static email campaigns to offering dynamic content deployment for email, landing pages, mobile and social. They’ve also incorporated features that rely on machine learning and artificial intelligence for functions such as lead scoring, in addition to investing in the user interface and scalability.

The growing popularity of account-based marketing has also been a force influencing vendors’ roadmaps, as marketers seek to serve the buying group in a holistic manner — speaking to all of its members and their different priorities. And, ideally, these tools let marketers send buyer information through their tight integrations with CRMs, giving the sales team a leg up when it comes to closing the deal. Learn more here.


About The Author

Corey Patterson is an Editor for MarTech and Search Engine Land. With a background in SEO, content marketing, and journalism, he covers SEO and PPC to help marketers improve their campaigns.



Source link

Continue Reading

MARKETING

Is the pandemic stock bubble bursting?

Published

on

Is the pandemic stock bubble bursting?


MarTech’s daily brief features daily insights, news, tips, and essential bits of wisdom for today’s digital marketer. If you would like to read this before the rest of the internet does, sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox daily.

Good morning, Marketers, and is the pandemic stock bubble bursting?

It’s common knowledge that, while some sectors of the economy struggled mightily during the COVID-related lockdowns of 2020 and 2021, any business that provided support for stay-at-home consumers and remote workers struggled too — but the struggle was to keep up with demand. Despite reports that Omicron has yet to plateau nationwide, it’s possible that degrees of returns to normality are making the stocks of those companies less appealing.

Netflix shares have taken a pounding after it narrowly missed its Q4 2021 goal for added subscribers and announced a way lower forecast for Q1 2022 (dropping from 8.5 to 2.5 million). Increased competition in the space? Sure. People spending less time at home? Perhaps.

I took a look at a couple of stocks that are part of many marketers’ ways of life. ON24, the B2B webinar platform that made its debut on the market last year has drifted steadily around $16 to $20 over the last few months, but has shown a large decline since the heady days following the IPO. And Zoom? The poster boy for COVID success? A drop in value of over 70% from its 2020 peak. A rational market correction? Perhaps. Or perhaps it means we’re opening up again, in investors’ perceptions at least.

See also  These 20 A/B Testing Variables Measure Successful Marketing Campaigns

Kim Davis

Editorial Director

Shorts

Quote of the day.  “If LinkedIn ever creates a metaverse I hope it’s called LinkedIn Park.”  Conall Laverty, founder and CEO, Wia


About The Author

Kim Davis is the Editorial Director of MarTech. Born in London, but a New Yorker for over two decades, Kim started covering enterprise software ten years ago. His experience encompasses SaaS for the enterprise, digital- ad data-driven urban planning, and applications of SaaS, digital technology, and data in the marketing space. He first wrote about marketing technology as editor of Haymarket’s The Hub, a dedicated marketing tech website, which subsequently became a channel on the established direct marketing brand DMN. Kim joined DMN proper in 2016, as a senior editor, becoming Executive Editor, then Editor-in-Chief a position he held until January 2020. Prior to working in tech journalism, Kim was Associate Editor at a New York Times hyper-local news site, The Local: East Village, and has previously worked as an editor of an academic publication, and as a music journalist. He has written hundreds of New York restaurant reviews for a personal blog, and has been an occasional guest contributor to Eater.





Source link

Continue Reading

DON'T MISS ANY IMPORTANT NEWS!
Subscribe To our Newsletter
We promise not to spam you. Unsubscribe at any time.
Invalid email address

Trending